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Old 09-03-2014, 09:02 AM   #1651
windblown101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
Synergy - the combination of multiple ingredients producing a result greater than the simple arithmetic summation of the individual components.

Point being motorcycle safety is attention to a lot of things that collectively contribute to the rider being safer than the sum of the individual 'things' they do. Regardless of the topic of the article, to start with a picture of a rider wearing dress pants and sneakers is just plain bad form. No other part of your body is more likely to get badly mangled, even a simple off, than unprotected or poorly protected legs, ankles, and feet sliding along the road under the weight of a motorcycle. The largest percentage of injuries occurred to the leg and foot area — 30 percent of all non-fatal motorcycle injuries were recorded on the lower extremities. Next to a helmet, proper pants and boots are the most important safety gear.
Geez, I saw your post last night. I just didn't feel like responding in kind to your assumption that I would not know the definition of a simple word. Besides, it's just not that big of a deal to me that you're upset. :)

Yeah... I get it. Rider in pic does not "epitomise" (for you cat) the full picture of safety. But as I said, the article was about the mental aspects of riding, not gear. It was a bit of a "meh..." article but the foundation of it was decent enough, I'd rank it as at least better than nothing.

Anyone who has ridden very long (and I assume that includes you) knows the first line of defense is to be mentally tuned in - ahead of where you are on the bike and just as importantly tuned in to everyone around you. The threshold braking, emergency maneuvers, etc all come into play when the mental side screws up a bit. The gear comes into play only when the mental and physical skills fail. Are all aspects important? Absolutely! Everyone screws up eventually. One short article a few paragraphs long could not cover all that. If you want to be pissed-off over the pic then have at.
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:05 AM   #1652
Sunbeem
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I found much sense in the "Mindfulness" article, (but then, that's what I was looking for... seek and you will find.)

I do think however, that due to a misleading choice of words, something is lost.
When motorcycling I feel it is important to be in the "Here and Now." If close observation is maintained, it becomes apparent that the mind knows only the past and the future, and when we are truly "present", it does not operate at all. Our perception is at its sharpest, until thoughts inevitably recur.

I fear none of us are enlightened beings, able to switch off the mind's incessant chatter at will, so we ride around with a headful of thoughts concerning this morning's row with the missus, or what's for tea - but I reckon the age-old quest for the mind's "off-switch" so it can be used when needed and then laid to rest, can be the difference between life and death for the motorcyclist.

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Old 09-15-2014, 02:46 PM   #1653
blahwas
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You steer into the direction you look. So don't look too close in front of your bike, but towards the exit of the corner. Anything right in front of your bike cannot be avoided anymore, it has already happened.

Your bike is faster to react than you are. Don't do anything in panic. Keep cool even if something feels wrong, don't react abruptly. 99% of the time time, your bike is going to straight itself out just fine, like going over a small patch of sand in the middle of a corner at speed.

Tires are the single most important thing between you and the road. Make sure your ties are in good condition. Don't ride with tires that are used up. Don't try to scrape another 1000 km from tires that you've ridden flat - there is no fun to be had there. Don't buy cheap tires - buy the best tires you can find. Pay attention to tire pressure (check every 2 weeks) and any foreign objects.

Pay attention to everybody else on the road. Learn, learn, learn what to expect from them. Going a few year in a car before jumping on a bike can be helpful. If you do something they don't expect, don't expect them to react wisely.

Don't try to follow faster riders. Seriously, don't. Ride at your own pace.

Pause early, pause often. Once every hour it is for me, at least for 5 minutes.

If you want to break any rules (include these ones), do so carefully, consciously, and progress in small steps.

You need to ride at least 6000 miles per year, every year, to become a "good" rider. 10 miles every day is better than 300 miles daily in one week.

Get the best helmet you can afford and make sure it fits snuggly. You will be more concentrated for a longer period of time. You will have better vision. And they might even be safer in case of a crash.

If there is wind noise, fix it. I favor tiny and gently inclined windscreens (being able to see the top edge of the screen, and only that, ensures your helmet is in laminar winds and no turbulence). You can also try to hide behind a wind screen. Wind noise makes you tired and damages your hearing. Hearing damage is irreversible.

If anything on your bike makes you feel uncomfortable, fix it. Stock seats come to my mind. Missing gear indicators, awkward lever positions, tiny Japanese handlebars as from a woman's bicycle. Make it yours and make it fit to yourself.

Never ride without proper protection. The most important pieces, in this order, according to myself, are:
1. helmet
2. boots
3. gloves
4. jacket
5. pants
1-3 should be on always. Hands and feet are slow to recover and any damage will seriously hinder your social skills for the rest of your live.
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blahwas screwed with this post 09-15-2014 at 02:52 PM
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Old 09-16-2014, 11:24 PM   #1654
Hedonist222
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Is it uncommon to wiggle your way to the front at a traffic light?
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Old 09-17-2014, 05:34 AM   #1655
PFFOG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedonist222 View Post
Is it uncommon to wiggle your way to the front at a traffic light?

That might get you shot or run over in most of the US and Canada. Common in the rest of the world, but 'Mericans seem to have a small dick, narcissistic attitude.
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Old 09-17-2014, 07:28 AM   #1656
Hedonist222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PFFOG View Post
That might get you shot or run over in most of the US and Canada. Common in the rest of the world, but 'Mericans seem to have a small dick, narcissistic attitude.
It's like skipping the line huh.
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Old 09-17-2014, 01:00 PM   #1657
Rango
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedonist222 View Post
It's like skipping the line huh.
It is the safest way for motorcyclists and it shortens the lines: win win.
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Old 09-18-2014, 02:09 AM   #1658
Sunbeem
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I think there's a downside to jumping the queue, in that some car drivers are glad of an excuse to vilify motorcyclists, and they see it as bad manners, (so do I).
Worst place to have an angry driver is behind me.

There's going fast, and then there's being in a hurry. Very different mindsets I think.

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Old 09-18-2014, 12:43 PM   #1659
Rango
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbeem View Post
I think there's a downside to jumping the queue, in that some car drivers are glad of an excuse to vilify motorcyclists, and they see it as bad manners, (so do I).
Worst place to have an angry driver is behind me.

There's going fast, and then there's being in a hurry. Very different mindsets I think.

Sunbeem.
Maybe. Go with the flow, I guess, or "as in Rome..."
Here it is perfectly normal and accepted behaviour. Most drivers will even make extra room if needed, when they see one coming.
Going through the lanes anyway is done at a slow pace.
Like you said, it's not about being in a hurry, rather being safe and shortening the lines, which benefits all.
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Old 09-19-2014, 02:59 AM   #1660
kevsta
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it seems to me that almost every accident starts with an incorrect assumption. like for example

Quote:
"he will wait until I have passed, to pull out"

"they will both continue moving in straight lines while I whip through the middle"

"there won't be any oil on the road just after the apex of the turn"

"I am good enough to get round this corner at this speed"

"nobody will suddenly appear at that sideroad and turn towards me while I am overtaking this lorry"

"there will not be an old biddy in a Renault Clio coming round this blind corner COMPLETELY on my side of the road"
the last of these happened to me yesterday morning on my bike, with about 20 metres between us I slammed on the brakes, she saw me and started back towards her own lane, and I got through the gap between her and the rockface to my right, with just a minor heart attack.

I would say just try your very hardest not to assume that anything cant change in an instant, and ride accordingly.
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Old 09-22-2014, 09:00 PM   #1661
lingam
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Things I wish someone had told me starting motorcycling

1) Look as far into the turn as you can when going around a curve.

2) Watching an object you wish to avoid will tend to make you hit that object.

3) Pushing on the right side of the handlebar will cause a motorcycle going more than about 5 mph to go left and vice versa.
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Old 09-23-2014, 05:40 AM   #1662
mjc506
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Originally Posted by lingam View Post
3) Pushing on the right side of the handlebar will cause a motorcycle going more than about 5 mph to go left and vice versa.
Erm... no
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Old 09-23-2014, 09:01 AM   #1663
moggi1964
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjc506 View Post
Erm... no


I concur!
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Old 09-24-2014, 07:29 PM   #1664
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Know your limits and don't exceed them!

Oh and wear some fraggin' gear!!! Every ride!
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Old 09-24-2014, 07:34 PM   #1665
NavyNick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PFFOG View Post
That might get you shot or run over in most of the US and Canada. Common in the rest of the world, but 'Mericans seem to have a small dick, narcissistic attitude.
Hey dude not all of us are like that...

Americans are just not used to, as a whole, motorcycles. My outlook on it is you stop treating me like a car with proper space and room i'll stop acting like a car and smoke your ass.
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