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Old 09-25-2014, 03:03 PM   #1666
JohnCW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbeem View Post
I think there's a downside to jumping the queue, in that some car drivers are glad of an excuse to vilify motorcyclists, and they see it as bad manners, (so do I).
Worst place to have an angry driver is behind me.
While were on this subject. While I'm all for people being orderly and waiting their turn in a queue to be served at a shop or whatever, why is moving to the front of the traffic queue on a motorcycle "bad manners"? It's is not jumping the line. The road doesn't belong to 4 wheeled vehicles. The traffic queue only exists because some road users have decided to use a large vehicle. Why should these people have a right to hold up people who choose a vehicle that doesn't create a traffic jam. They should be apologizing to the motorcycle rider for holding them up.

Anyone who thinks that a motorcycle rider moving through stationary traffic is jumping the line needs to reprogram their thinking. The motorcyclist is not jumping the line, the car drivers blocking up the road are inconveniencing the motorcyclist.
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Old 09-26-2014, 10:41 AM   #1667
ruin
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Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
While were on this subject. While I'm all for people being orderly and waiting their turn in a queue to be served at a shop or whatever, why is moving to the front of the traffic queue on a motorcycle "bad manners"? It's is not jumping the line. The road doesn't belong to 4 wheeled vehicles. The traffic queue only exists because some road users have decided to use a large vehicle. Why should these people have a right to hold up people who choose a vehicle that doesn't create a traffic jam. They should be apologizing to the motorcycle rider for holding them up.

Anyone who thinks that a motorcycle rider moving through stationary traffic is jumping the line needs to reprogram their thinking. The motorcyclist is not jumping the line, the car drivers blocking up the road are inconveniencing the motorcyclist.
My only "problem" with filtering/line-jumping is when it happens at turns. A bike to my right going straight when I'm in my truck trying to make a right turn at a light is irritating -- especially if it's a right-on-red and the bike is waiting for the light in order to go straight.

Between two lanes is fine, and a 3' bike lane painted between all such lanes would really be welcome everywhere -- even in no-splitting/filtering states, which is most of them.
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Old 10-01-2014, 09:52 AM   #1668
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My only "problem" with filtering/line-jumping is when it happens at turns. A bike to my right going straight when I'm in my truck trying to make a right turn at a light is irritating -- especially if it's a right-on-red and the bike is waiting for the light in order to go straight.

Between two lanes is fine, and a 3' bike lane painted between all such lanes would really be welcome everywhere -- even in no-splitting/filtering states, which is most of them.
Most sensible people wouldn't be splitting in a manner that put them into a right-hook situation. I've filtered plenty of times at lights, be it for a left/right/straight movement. When it comes to a bicycle lane, that one is OFF LIMITS to any/all motor vehicles , motorcycles included. The only exception is to turn (within 100' and always yielding to any/all cyclists in the lane). It isn't a lane to "split" or "filter" in. The same with the shoulder. I see some motorcyclists riding on the shoulder - a bad idea and illegal.
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Old 10-01-2014, 09:56 AM   #1669
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Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
While were on this subject. While I'm all for people being orderly and waiting their turn in a queue to be served at a shop or whatever, why is moving to the front of the traffic queue on a motorcycle "bad manners"? It's is not jumping the line. The road doesn't belong to 4 wheeled vehicles. The traffic queue only exists because some road users have decided to use a large vehicle. Why should these people have a right to hold up people who choose a vehicle that doesn't create a traffic jam. They should be apologizing to the motorcycle rider for holding them up.

Anyone who thinks that a motorcycle rider moving through stationary traffic is jumping the line needs to reprogram their thinking. The motorcyclist is not jumping the line, the car drivers blocking up the road are inconveniencing the motorcyclist.
So far, I haven't had anyone get noticeably upset when I've filtered ahead at lights (or in traffic). Mind you, it is legal here in California. What I have seen, amusingly enough and rare, are motorcyclists seeming to get in a huff because I split and they sat in the queue. In those cases, they had some cruiser that was too wide to be able to. They would either block (well, attempt to) or do something else to make it more difficult. Motorists are easier to pass than some motorcyclists.
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Old 10-01-2014, 10:37 AM   #1670
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Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.


#1.) Never feel that you need to ride above or beyond your current skill level. If the group you are riding with demand it, or belittle you because you cannot... find another, smarter group to ride with. Only massively insecure personality types would make fun of a beginning rider.

IMO, more accidents occur because someone was riding beyond their means than any other reason.

Be yerself!
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Old 10-01-2014, 11:16 AM   #1671
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#1.) Never feel that you need to ride above or beyond your current skill level. If the group you are riding with demand it, or belittle you because you cannot... find another, smarter group to ride with. Only massively insecure personality types would make fun of a beginning rider.

IMO, more accidents occur because someone was riding beyond their means than any other reason.

Be yerself!
Be proud to be slow Because it's really embarrassing to ask the guys to help pull your bike out of the ditch.

I have very little ego when it comes to that kind of stuff, and usually good self control when it comes to riding. But ride fast with me behind you and somehow my brain shuts off and a little voice loudly shouts over all my reasonable thoughts: "if they can do it, so can you!" The part I'm overlooking in those situations is that they might be riding at a 9 out of 10. Do I really have the skills and comfort to ride with such a narrow window for error? Can I really ride flawlessly? Probably not.

After riding to work today in the rain, noob advice of the day is treat it like it's ice. Much longer braking distances, much slower turning speeds. Because you might see the paint on the road and avoid it's slippery surface, but the manhole cover after it sneaks up on ya. Drag your brakes a little in moments when you feel nervous to clean the water off them or they have a delayed reaction.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:49 PM   #1672
JohnCW
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Originally Posted by TheProphet View Post
Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.


#1.) Never feel that you need to ride above or beyond your current skill level. If the group you are riding with demand it, or belittle you because you cannot... find another, smarter group to ride with. Only massively insecure personality types would make fun of a beginning rider.

IMO, more accidents occur because someone was riding beyond their means than any other reason.

Be yerself!
Definitely agree with your sentiment. But I don't think the main problem is others demanding or ridiculing someone who is slower as I've never seen that happen. Not saying it doesn't happen at all, but I believe a far bigger problem is the ego of the less experienced rider. He/she pushes them self beyond their comfort/skill level in order to keep up, so as not to be perceived as a lesser rider by the group. It's all self imposed.

Ego is the biggest problem, and in reality most groups don't give a hoot if someone is a bit slower. If the group has to wait 10-15 minutes at each stop for the slower rider then for sure your probably with the wrong group. But waiting 5 minutes, we do it all the time and gives the faster riders a chance to dismount and have a chat while they're waiting. No problem.
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Old 10-01-2014, 07:17 PM   #1673
sdmichael
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Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
Definitely agree with your sentiment. But I don't think the main problem is others demanding or ridiculing someone who is slower as I've never seen that happen. Not saying it doesn't happen at all, but I believe a far bigger problem is the ego of the less experienced rider. He/she pushes them self beyond their comfort/skill level in order to keep up, so as not to be perceived as a lesser rider by the group. It's all self imposed.

Ego is the biggest problem, and in reality most groups don't give a hoot if someone is a bit slower. If the group has to wait 10-15 minutes at each stop for the slower rider then for sure your probably with the wrong group. But waiting 5 minutes, we do it all the time and gives the faster riders a chance to dismount and have a chat while they're waiting. No problem.
I agree as well. The concept of "chicken strips" on tires is a good example. The very name speaks of ridiculing/demeaning something as a lesser. I've done well with the concept of keeping my skill level higher than my confidence level. When it goes the other way, accidents happen. I don't have a problem waiting for another. Riding is fun, not a race to the finish. To do so makes the ride end that much sooner and I'd rather be out riding.
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:22 PM   #1674
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Dont sell one......unless you own two.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:54 AM   #1675
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdmichael View Post
... Riding is fun, not a race to the finish. To do so makes the ride end that much sooner and I'd rather be out riding.
It's the "journey", not the destination and all that. Excellent point. Learn to enjoy every moment of the ride, and develop the habit of being in the "now" as opposed to "who gets there first".

Riding - and life in general - is a whole lot better that way!
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Old 10-02-2014, 07:53 AM   #1676
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Originally Posted by TheProphet View Post
It's the "journey", not the destination and all that. Excellent point. Learn to enjoy every moment of the ride, and develop the habit of being in the "now" as opposed to "who gets there first".



Riding - and life in general - is a whole lot better that way!

Amen... +1!!
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Old 10-03-2014, 08:34 AM   #1677
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Amen... +1!!
Yup!
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Old 10-08-2014, 10:04 AM   #1678
DAKEZ
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Dont sell one......unless you own four.
Edited

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Old 10-08-2014, 02:42 PM   #1679
TheProphet
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Another tidbit of advice for a nOOb would be to practice, practice, practice slow speed maneuvers, parking lot maneuvers, slow turns, low speed U-Turns and so on.

Anyone - and I mean anyone - can ride on a straight highway at speed. This is the easiest part of overall riding. Those that excel at lower speed maneuvering are the real experts, and we can all learn from them.

Lastly, don't get hung up on "Chicken Strips", and the act of peg grinding. If you watch the Pro's in say MotoGP style racing, you will notice that the riders lean off the bike so that the bike itself doesn't need to lean so much, thereby utilizing a nice contact patch on the tire, maintain better control and not needing to scrub off any speed. Worry and practice first how to handle the bike at total ease at slow speeds, and the rest will come naturally. Time spent at speed on straight highways does little to expand your riding expertise, and only logs saddle time. Granted, this is fun, but the spirit is advice for nOOb riders.

#1 goal is always to be safe, and secondly to have fun.

Bob
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Old 10-10-2014, 05:13 PM   #1680
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Most important thing I am noticing, as a noob with about 1500 miles in this first month, is: beware of becoming complacent, or cocky. I am already having to remind myself of this as I gain confidence. Proficiency is no substitute for good judgement.
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