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Old 03-26-2010, 07:06 PM   #16
eepeqez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMusicMark
”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”
The last thing my driving instructor told me when he dropped me home after my (car) licence test several decades ago went something along the lines of:

"If you cannot see that it is definitely clear to go, DO NOT GO".

You are not looking to "see if any cars are coming", as we've all heard mothers say to their young children.

You are looking to "make sure that NOTHING is coming".


Also, I have had a single nasty burn to my right arm from every bike I have ever owned except my new Super Sherpa.

I paid someone else to change the oil on the Sherpa - all the others I leant on the exhaust pipe at some time or another when removing the drain plug or filter. None of them ever got me twice.
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Old 03-27-2010, 06:24 AM   #17
R-A-M-O-N
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I burnt my forearm twice when trying to rotate my rear wheel to lube the chain, i still feel like an idiot about that and it may happen again

So another advice is never try to do something in a hurry unless you like scars
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Old 03-27-2010, 06:49 AM   #18
LuciferMutt
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Never outride your sight distance; be able to stop on the road you can see, even if you've been on the same road a thousand times.

Never accelerate into a situation that looks out of the ordinary for any reason. As a matter of fact, when approaching a situation that looks strange (car parked on the shoulder, people near the road, etc) it's a damn good idea to drop 10 MPH from your speed if it is safe to do so.

Trust your gut.

Learn how to brake hard and practice it at least once a season, preferably more.
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Old 03-27-2010, 08:51 AM   #19
R-A-M-O-N
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On the subject of braking i found in my experience that if you always use a proper braking technique (i.e. that is effective) it always pay up when you have to actually brake hard in an emergency, i sometimes surprised myself how well i reacted but i know it was because no matter how slight the braking i always press my legs, relax my arms to keep my ability to manouver, dont put to much stress on the brakes, etc.
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Old 03-27-2010, 08:57 AM   #20
Aussijussi
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Million things, well nearly, lot of really good advise in the post's before,staying focused,slow into curve's, fast out, learn to counter steer,if you havent allready,have a few goe's at the local track if possible, i went to a defenssive riding course, which was really worth it. One more thing somebody mentioned before but i'll say it again, dont try to stay with faster more experienced riders, plenty of time for that later, good luck, this is the best pastime in the world, par none,well maybe skiing.
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Old 03-27-2010, 09:10 AM   #21
espressodrinker
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[quote=bomber60015]Things like..."Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

this is simply untrue -- raising up on the pegs will elevated the center of mass of the bike/rider combination.

quote]

Oh no please !!!!!!!
Not this rubbish again.
Please go and read about a gazillion posts about this to know that you are talking rubbish!
Noobs............... Ignore this man please
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Old 03-27-2010, 11:29 AM   #22
Motopapillon
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3 Rules for Safe Riding

1) Don't hit anything.
2) Don't let anything hit you.
3) Don't fall over.

Sounds simple enough, doesn't it?

M-P
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Old 03-27-2010, 01:25 PM   #23
Navy Chief
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motopapillon
1) Don't hit anything.
2) Don't let anything hit you.
3) Don't fall over.

Sounds simple enough, doesn't it?

M-P
I like the simple logic of this!
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Old 03-27-2010, 03:05 PM   #24
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1: Always remember:

On a motorcycle you will FEEL proficient long before you really ARE.


Quote:
Originally Posted by eepeqez
Also, I have had a single nasty burn to my right arm from every bike I have ever owned..... I leant on the exhaust pipe at some time or another when removing the drain plug or filter. None of them ever got me twice.
2: When you want to change the oil,don´t start the engine and let it run for a few minutes to warm up the oil, go on a proper ride instead and then wait for an hour -- the oil will still be hot, but the exhaust will already be cold.
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Old 03-27-2010, 06:29 PM   #25
wizze
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It's easier to see if somebody is moving towards you by watching where the tire meets the road. This works for vehicles at intersections, vehicles changing lanes, etc. The ones that bug me are the cagers that are "looking at you" but start rolling before they really oughta.
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Old 03-27-2010, 09:09 PM   #26
miah66
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Thumb

Noob here, checking in. Good advice people.
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Old 03-27-2010, 10:31 PM   #27
ralpfsbud
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couple of things ive learned
the throttle is your friend, learn how to use it.

i have crashed, i will crash again. there is nothing wrong with it, and doing it will remove the fear of it. i wear the gear so i can get back up. its part of riding off road,

i ride with people that are better than i am to learn, but if i fall behind its ok. i push it when i think its a good idea, and dont when its not. youve got to spend the time in the saddle to learn the difference, nothing will teach you more than time in the saddle. i ride ANY time i can for that reason.

AND.... the throttle is your friend, when you know how to use it
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Old 03-27-2010, 11:00 PM   #28
eRRmmm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ralpfsbud
couple of things ive learned
the throttle is your friend, learn how to use it.
Agree. Twist the throttle, don't roll it... Sounds simple, but learn proper throttle control and you will have much better control of the bike.

Also reinforcing what others have said - ride to your ability, keeping up with other riders could hurt you. Just because they are faster doesn't mean they are better riders. A good rider will go for a long time without a crash. A fast rider if he's not also a good rider will crash on a regular basis, I've ridden with a few of them. One of these crashes may end his riding career. If you get a chance to ride with a good and fast rider - watch and learn.
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Old 03-27-2010, 11:14 PM   #29
Anticyclone
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One of my best friends told me, years before I started riding, to keep as much space as possible between you and another vehicle. Sounds simple, but it's pretty hard for a car to hit you if it's 50 yards away
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Old 03-28-2010, 08:17 AM   #30
rapidoxidationman
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It is more fun to ride a slow bike fast than to ride a fast bike slow
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