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Old 03-19-2011, 03:03 PM   #541
mfp4073
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I dont remember seeing this posted in this thread, but recently have come to the realization that if a car pulls out on you, merges lanes, or whatever else happens and you need to move fast/change lanes that you can dive to the center or side lines if you dont have space or time to look if your exit is clear. Generally someone pulling out or merging is not going to go two lanes and most of the time our american roads are wide enough for a bike and a car if the bike is on the center/side lines.

as you move that way or once you get there you can then look for the rest of your "out".

I still mean to have situational awareness, but in an emergency seems like it could give you that extra 1/4 second reaction.
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Old 03-24-2011, 01:22 AM   #542
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I wish there was a way to move this to the front page.

Lane positioning 101
** *
When on a two lane road, it's safest to ride in the left side of your lane . You are more visible there. Yes you are closer to oncoming cars there, but you have room to move if needed.

When on a four lane road, if your'e in the slow lane, stay in the left side of it. Even if there are cars in the lane next to you. *Why? Because It's your lane and they cant share it with you.*

If you're in the fast lane, ride in the right side of it, even if there's traffic next to you. Don't give cars an opportunity to lane share, they will.

Always leave it in gear when stopped at lights. Always leave a cars lenghth in front of you (escape route) When car/s have pulled up behind you and rear ender danger is over you can find neutral if you want. **


Finally, don't go when the light turns green! *Go because you've checked for cars.

Edit: If you drive on the left side of the road in your home country, reverse left and right above^^.
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Old 03-24-2011, 07:11 AM   #543
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Originally Posted by Myopic View Post
When on a two lane road, it's safest to ride in the left side of your lane . You are more visible there. Yes you are closer to oncoming cars there, but you have room to move if needed.
While being mindful that if there are two or more oncoming cars... Move to the extreme right to make yourself more visible to the vehicle that may want to pull out and pass.
Edited. (italic mine)

Oh and don't be myopic when you ride.
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DAKEZ screwed with this post 12-09-2013 at 10:50 AM
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Old 03-24-2011, 10:11 AM   #544
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I'm doing some research on what would be more helpful to know at a person’s start in motorcycling versus learning it over years in the "school of hard knocks".

Things like..."Don't transport a bike on the centerstand. It might break the frame". or "Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)
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Old 03-24-2011, 10:35 AM   #545
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I'm doing some research on what would be more helpful to know at a person’s start in motorcycling versus learning it over years in the "school of hard knocks".

Things like..."Don't transport a bike on the centerstand. It might break the frame". or "Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)

that the insurance will be very very cheap in the uk for bikes. nowing that i would not of wasted my money on my one and only car. now its bikes only all the time.
bike parts are so cheap to.
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:21 PM   #546
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Originally Posted by Myopic View Post
If you're in the fast lane, ride in the right side of it, even if there's traffic next to you. Don't give cars an opportunity to lane share, they will.
I disagree on this. If somebody changes lanes without checking their blind spot then you're right next to them and have little time to react. I generally stay in the left side of the lane because it gives me more time to react to somebody changing lanes into me. This has saved my butt a few times where I would've been knocked down on the freeway if I'd been riding in the right side of the left lane. Also, if something happens ahead of me I'm closer to the shoulder for an out.
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:24 PM   #547
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Good post!

Good post!
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Old 03-25-2011, 11:44 AM   #548
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Myopic
If you're in the fast lane, ride in the right side of it, even if there's traffic next to you. Don't give cars an opportunity to lane share, they will.
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Originally Posted by duck View Post
I disagree on this. If somebody changes lanes without checking their blind spot then you're right next to them and have little time to react. I generally stay in the left side of the lane because it gives me more time to react to somebody changing lanes into me. This has saved my butt a few times where I would've been knocked down on the freeway if I'd been riding in the right side of the left lane. Also, if something happens ahead of me I'm closer to the shoulder for an out.
Personally, I do both. I mostly stick to the right side of the fast lane for 2 reasons: 1. better vision up the highway, 2. I stay in the sideview mirror and out of the blind spot of cars ahead in the right lane so they won't change lanes into me.
BUT... like duck says, when I'm about to pass those cars to my right, I'll move out to the left side of the lane to avoid being knocked down. The moving around in the lane serves another goal of establishing the whole lane as mine to use, discouraging cars from trying to share the space with me.


...........shu
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:20 PM   #549
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There is no hard and fast rule as to what part of the lane is best (nor should there be) no matter what lane you are in. The rider should remain fluid and move freely in whatever lane they are in to increase vision and visibility.

I do agree completely that the rider should (and needs to) take ownership of the lane and to do that I believe being assertive and staying out of blind spots is the best way to accomplish this.

To say: "When on a two lane road, it's safest to ride in the left side of your lane" is just asking for a head-on from a car that pulls out to pass IMO. I am on the White line to the far right to help the oncoming cars in the line to see me... and in a good position if they do not.

Ride Safe Ride Often.
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Old 03-26-2011, 04:52 PM   #550
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
There is no hard and fast rule as to what part of the lane is best (nor should there be) no matter what lane you are in. The rider should remain fluid and move freely in whatever lane they are in to increase vision and visibility.

I do agree completely that the rider should (and needs to) take ownership of the lane and to do that I believe being assertive and staying out of blind spots is the best way to accomplish this.

To say: "When on a two lane road, it's safest to ride in the left side of your lane" is just asking for a head-on from a car that pulls out to pass IMO. I am on the White line to the far right to help the oncoming cars in the line to see me... and in a good position if they do not.

Ride Safe Ride Often.
Agreed that lane position shouldn't be fixed and varies according to many factors.

Anything not in the 20 degree cone ahead of them is a blind spot to many drivers. I do avoid riding in blind spots to the extent possible but never trust any cage around me.

I don't ride the white line on a two lane road because that's where all of the shit ends up. I also think you're more likely to hit critters there too. I get fairly close to the center line if I'm following someone. That way oncoming drivers can see my aux lights behind the car in front of me and won't SMIDSY a left across my path. And I know drivers do see me that way because I usually see them correct to their right a little about 100 yards before getting to me.
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:52 PM   #551
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Thanks guys, for pointing out that lane position is not as black and white as I had stated.

All valid points stated above. I choose to be in the smallest blindspot possible for the least amount of time.
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:08 PM   #552
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Sooo many good tips here. I don't have time to read the entire thread....read a lot this morning, so if I'm repeating stuff, my apologies.

Here's a couple:

Try to be as aware of what's behind you, and how close, and what's beside you in either lane as what's ahead of you. This requires frequent mirror checking and neck whips if you're planning a lane change.

Two: When you pull up to a stoplight, ALWAYS be in first gear, leave some distance between you and the vehicle in front and identify an escape route should you need it, immediately turn handlebars so that you can monitor what's going on behind you in your lane.....just in case some one is goofing off and doesn't notice the stopped traffic. If that happens, you are ready to dive into the escape route, between lanes..etc. There were several AZ riders killed this past year by being crunched by a dump truck while, I imagine, all sitting in neutral chatting at a red light. Had they been sitting in 1st. gear and aware of what was happening behind them, some might have survived. Very Sad!
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Old 03-28-2011, 07:31 AM   #553
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Two: When you pull up to a stoplight, ALWAYS be in first gear, leave some distance between you and the vehicle in front and identify an escape route should you need it, immediately turn handlebars so that you can monitor what's going on behind you in your lane.....just in case some one is goofing off and doesn't notice the stopped traffic. If that happens, you are ready to dive into the escape route, between lanes..etc. There were several AZ riders killed this past year by being crunched by a dump truck while, I imagine, all sitting in neutral chatting at a red light. Had they been sitting in 1st. gear and aware of what was happening behind them, some might have survived. Very Sad![/QUOTE]

in the uk when i stop at red lights i always stop out of gear becouse most of the time there is nowhere to go. as if you are stopped at a light and going to turn left there will be a pavment on your left and a 2nd lane of cars on your right. if its in 1st gear it will flip over if you get rear ended as you will let out the clutch suddenly. if its out off gear the bike will just fall over and my slid a wee bit
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Old 03-28-2011, 03:54 PM   #554
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[QUOTE=in the uk when i stop at red lights i always stop out of gear becouse most of the time there is nowhere to go. as if you are stopped at a light and going to turn left there will be a pavment on your left and a 2nd lane of cars on your right. if its in 1st gear it will flip over if you get rear ended as you will let out the clutch suddenly. if its out off gear the bike will just fall over and my slid a wee bit[/QUOTE]

I don't see an R100GS doing a flip if you drop the clutch... Maybe on a steep up hill at full throttle.
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Old 03-28-2011, 07:10 PM   #555
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Noobs Must Know

Counter steering, delayed apex, throttle control, body position etc, etc.

Get David Hough's "Proficient Motorcycling" and pick any or all. Attempting to do something a specific way is irrelevant unless you know and understand why you should do it that way.
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