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Old 04-24-2011, 10:52 AM   #601
Frank Sosa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Well said!!! Clearly you get it.


(not too sure about the “trust” part… I trust no other road user. Blindfold the lot of them and I would still ride… It would just be even more fun)
Thanks Dakez. Here's another one and it kind of relates to this guy right above this post about practicing full stop breaking:

Check yourself and never be so confident in yourself as to never consider safety advice from other riders. The other day dakez and I were arguing about another topic regarding safety and he said he practices full stop breaking all the time. I thought, "this guy is a total nut!" Then the other night while I was riding the twisties home I was thinking about what he said and I thought "I wonder if I could pull a full stop here, say before that redwood tree on the right?" Hmm. Before you know it I was taking Dakez's advice and practicing full stops and found it very useful. So, in short, no matter how experienced you are always consider the wisdom of other riders.
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Old 04-25-2011, 08:06 AM   #602
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The great thing is that once a driver’s brain picks up a rider that does the lane weave their brain is forever programmed to see riders.
That's all it takes, huh? All a driver has to see is one bike weaving and they'll be permanently programmed to look for riders? OK, whatever.
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Old 04-25-2011, 07:49 PM   #603
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The great thing is that once a driver’s brain picks up a rider that does the lane weave their brain is forever programmed to see riders.
This was a joke, right?
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Old 04-25-2011, 08:02 PM   #604
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< Pot full of discussion.

From what I have read in studies this seems to be the case. Peoples eyes see the motorcycle and send a message to their brain. The brain does not acknowledge the motorcycle because it is looking for a car. (or anything else large enough to be a perceived threat)
Lateral motion (weave) breaks up the motion camouflage and allows the brain to acknowledge the motorcycle. The consensus from what I have read is that from that point forward that persons brain will acknowledge what the eyes send it in regards to seeing the motorcycle. Brains can be trained.

Is it true? That is open for discussion... I believe it to be true. It is the reason why riders see riders even when they are driving in a cage. Their brains are trained to see riders.

Duck is skeptical it seems. Nothing wrong with that. It is not like I would bet my life on it or anything.
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DAKEZ screwed with this post 04-25-2011 at 08:20 PM
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Old 04-25-2011, 08:36 PM   #605
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
< Pot full of discussion.

From what I have read in studies this seems to be the case. Peoples eyes see the motorcycle and send a message to their brain. The brain does not acknowledge the motorcycle because it is looking for a car. (or anything else large enough to be a perceived threat)
Lateral motion (weave) breaks up the motion camouflage and allows the brain to acknowledge the motorcycle. The consensus from what I have read is that from that point forward that persons brain will acknowledge what the eyes send it in regards to seeing the motorcycle. Brains can be trained.

Is it true? That is open for discussion... I believe it to be true. It is the reason why riders see riders even when they are driving in a cage. Their brains are trained to see riders.

Duck is skeptical it seems. Nothing wrong with that. It is not like I would bet my life on it or anything.
I'd bet YOUR life on it.

From what I know of human behaviour, it's repetition that "programs" one's brain, not single occurrences of an event. Think Pavlov's dogs here.

Not to mention that I highly doubt that seeing a weaving motorcycle once conditions one's brain to look for non-weaving bikes in the future.
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Old 04-26-2011, 04:27 AM   #606
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I'd bet YOUR life on it.

From what I know of human behaviour, it's repetition that "programs" one's brain, not single occurrences of an event. Think Pavlov's dogs here.

Not to mention that I highly doubt that seeing a weaving motorcycle once conditions one's brain to look for non-weaving bikes in the future.
Repetition is the key ... was that Pavlov calling???? ... so everyone get weaving ... might save a life
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Old 04-27-2011, 03:34 PM   #607
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I also focus on the fact that 90 percent of my driving is with my wife as my passenger and the last thing I want is for her to be hurt because I wasn't paying attention.[/QUOTE]

As a n00b I won't let my wife ride with me until I get a couple more classes and some more miles under my belt. Yeah its fun and I wan't us both to enjoy it but is my lack of experience worth loosing her. Hell NO!
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Old 04-27-2011, 03:43 PM   #608
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Is your wife hot?

I'm sure there are lots of more experienced riders that would be willing to help out.

Dakez?
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Old 04-28-2011, 06:57 PM   #609
Frank Sosa
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I also focus on the fact that 90 percent of my driving is with my wife as my passenger and the last thing I want is for her to be hurt because I wasn't paying attention.
As a n00b I won't let my wife ride with me until I get a couple more classes and some more miles under my belt. Yeah its fun and I wan't us both to enjoy it but is my lack of experience worth loosing her. Hell NO![/QUOTE]

Man, welcome a first time poster to advrider by scamming on his wife you bastards!

Kind a had it coming though, he must of not been around the asylum long enough to consider the implications of bringing up the wife amongst the likes of you clowns.

Anyway, welcome jeff800gs, enjoy the fly new ride!
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Old 04-29-2011, 06:36 AM   #610
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Greetings! Middle-aged n00b here -- never owned a motorcycle, about to take my first BRC. Been enjoying the site. Great thread, but some of the discussion about basic riding techniques -- countersteering, braking -- had me wondering "Haven't these guys ever ridden a bicycle?"

I ride mountain and road bikes, and used to ride with an Expert-level motorcycle roadracer. We used to stop at empty parking lots and do skill drills for fun -- swerving, slaloms, stopping, low-speed maneuvering, etc. I still remember riding figure-8s thinking about head position and looking up and around the curve. The couple of times I've been on a dirt bike seemed very similar to my bicycle experience.

So -- if I'm allowed to suggest anything -- I'd think that an aspiring motorcyclist might want to pick up a yard-sale bicycle and go practice. Swapping the front brake to the right lever is easy, and kitchen sponges make good "cones" that won't throw you if you hit them.

The other suggestion would be to read Peter Egan's "Leanings" book. The fun he's had on small-displacement bikes has reinforced my notions of starting with something small and simple. The threads by riders of the mighty TW200 have also made me smile...

After the BRC, my plan is to buy gear and a used 200-ish dual-sport, and go play in the dirt -- or at least dirt/fire/logging roads -- until I'm not spending a lot of attention on the mechanics of riding. I know I'll need to spend that attention on traffic.

Thanks for all your help!
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Old 04-29-2011, 08:09 AM   #611
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It's amazing how a bicycle ride salvaged my pitiful noob technique and really helped me overcome the wobbliness and tendency to put a foot down. Riding on bike trails with pylons (sp?) and pedestrians REALLY helped me overcome my problem with target fixation.
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Old 04-29-2011, 01:48 PM   #612
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That's all it takes, huh? All a driver has to see is one bike weaving and they'll be permanently programmed to look for riders? OK, whatever.
I don't be-weave it
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Old 05-01-2011, 11:11 PM   #613
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2k miles on my first bike, dual sport, and I'm not going to pretend I really have something to add to this thread, but the one thing I wish someone had said two thousand miles ago is GET FORWARD AND HUMP THAT TANK. Unless you are specifically putting your weight to the back of the bike on purpose for traction or balance in certain off-road situations, get forward and ride with the front wheel, not sitting over the back one. You might not even realize you're too far back until the first time the rear wheel breaks traction and all of a sudden your nice friendly bike is a scary monster trying to kill you.

Also these are three things at least that have already been said that us noobs should believe completely right from the start unless you're just itching to have your first spill, scratch up your new toy and break your collarbone:

- Mud will wreck us noobs in the blink of an eye.

- Ruts will wreck us noobs in the blink of an eye.

- Leaves will wreck us noobs in the blink of an eye.

Unhappily, you are probably going to end up in the first muddy rut full of leaves you find whether you want to or not, they have a mysterious magnetic pull for new riders so consider your protective gear as essential to riding as your bike is!

Riding at the pace you feel in control can't be emphasized enough, even when your buddies are constantly pulling off to the side a half mile ahead for you to catch up, or when cars back up behind you in the twisties and you know you "should" be leaving them in your dust. We'll get to that point eventually and believe me you will have your share of OH SH** moments even while trying to be as careful as possible!
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Old 05-02-2011, 10:43 AM   #614
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Originally Posted by dolanrio View Post
Also these are three things at least that have already been said that us noobs should believe completely right from the start unless you're just itching to have your first spill, scratch up your new toy and break your collarbone:

- Mud will wreck us noobs in the blink of an eye.

- Ruts will wreck us noobs in the blink of an eye.

- Leaves will wreck us noobs in the blink of an eye.

Unhappily, you are probably going to end up in the first muddy rut full of leaves you find whether you want to or not, they have a mysterious magnetic pull for new riders so consider your protective gear as essential to riding as your bike is!
Amen!
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Old 05-09-2011, 04:23 PM   #615
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This one would have saved me a rib:
If you're going to ride logging roads on a dual sport, get rid of those (great on asphalt and gravel) Tourances/Anakees, and spoon on TKC-80's/KarooT's/HeidenauK60's. There will be pools of water, and mud on the bottom, and the street/gravel tires loose traction in a split second. The semi-knobbies will be much better adv tires.
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