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Old 01-25-2012, 04:11 PM   #811
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Originally Posted by filmfan View Post
None of those things are good habits for cars or motos. If you keep to good habits in a car, you don't have to change what you do on the moto.
Actually there's quite a bit of difference. You can get away with a lot more in a car due to decreased stopping distance and a lot of other factors. Point is they are survivable in a car and things almost everyone does (i.e. swinging around someone driving in front of you initiating a turn), not always so on a bike. Different animal entirely.
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Old 01-25-2012, 04:13 PM   #812
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Originally Posted by MotoMusicMark View Post
I'm doing some research on what would be more helpful to know at a person’s start in motorcycling versus learning it over years in the "school of hard knocks".

Things like..."Don't transport a bike on the centerstand. It might break the frame". or "Standing up on the pegs or at least putting more pressure on them makes the bike less top heavy and better to control at low speed".

Could you help my research by answering the following question...”What did you wish someone told you about motorcycling when you first started out?”

Thanks. Mark Tillack
Brinkhaven, OH(USA)
Using pressure on the pegs is a great skill but comes with experience, doesn't lower the center of gravity, just aids in initiating a turn and in relaxing your hands, which is a good thing.
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:21 AM   #813
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If you're driving, for example, a Fit, and erroneously trust the turn signal of an SUV, you can easily end up just as dead as you might on a bike. Not to mention that in that particular circumstance, you might have better luck on the bike due to (possibly) better power to weight ratio and acceleration.

Either way, if you do a manuever that might be considered "bad practice", and there is no bent metal resulting, you got away with it. If you don't get away with it, the consequences might well be highly undesirable.
It all depends on how much you want to trust chance or luck.
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:31 AM   #814
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Originally Posted by filmfan View Post
If you're driving, for example, a Fit, and erroneously trust the turn signal of an SUV, you can easily end up just as dead as you might on a bike. Not to mention that in that particular circumstance, you might have better luck on the bike due to (possibly) better power to weight ratio and acceleration.

Either way, if you do a manuever that might be considered "bad practice", and there is no bent metal resulting, you got away with it. If you don't get away with it, the consequences might well be highly undesirable.
It all depends on how much you want to trust chance or luck.
That's precisely why you need to change your focus from driving a car to driving a motorcycle. Drive them the same you're gonna have problems. Stopping distance alone tells you that much. It's common sense, you leave more room on a bike than in a car, that was my point, braking in a curve is another example, so is lane position. Bad practice in a car gets you honked at, bad practice on a bike can get you killed. Different animals, different skill set, different situational awareness.
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Old 01-26-2012, 10:26 AM   #815
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Originally Posted by BudCAD View Post
That's precisely why you need to change your focus from driving a car to driving a motorcycle. Drive them the same you're gonna have problems. Stopping distance alone tells you that much. It's common sense, you leave more room on a bike than in a car, that was my point, braking in a curve is another example, so is lane position. Bad practice in a car gets you honked at, bad practice on a bike can get you killed. Different animals, different skill set, different situational awareness.
Good road driving skills are universal; they are not unique two wheels.
Bad road driving skills are universal; they are not unique four wheels.
It's not what you ride, it's how you ride.
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Old 01-26-2012, 12:19 PM   #816
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Originally Posted by southwade View Post
Good road driving skills are universal; they are not unique two wheels.
Bad road driving skills are universal; they are not unique four wheels.
It's not what you ride, it's how you ride.
Couldn't agree more.
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:41 PM   #817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by filmfan View Post
None of those things are good habits for cars or motos. If you keep to good habits in a car, you don't have to change what you do on the moto.
+1
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:23 PM   #818
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Good postings on the subject.
Reading about skills and such, honing the skills, great stuff!
we all know about those that text and use distractive activities in their driving repertoire.
Using mirrors and maintaining distances are some really important points to cover.
.
How many of you out there, having had to travel in traffic, maintaining the distances needed, have found someone up your proverbial backside? How many of us recognized it in time to avert disaster?

I (BMW K 1200 LT) had a friend out there following me one day ( HD) and yes it was a wee bit spirited. Saw the light up ahead and i slowed in to stop. As i was watching in the mirror, i noted my friend coming up way too fast and with too little land between us.. I immediately pulled right and towards the corner of the car in front of me.. I heard his tires on the verge of total skid...... screeeeeeeeee. If i had stayed where i was, i would have had milwalkee paint all over me.

Not everyone knows their limitations.. Even in a car...Think about it.. How many teenagers practice panic stops? How many drivers/riders are aware of their braking performance at speed? Those distances im talking about can close up in a heartbeat.
Situational awareness is a huge skill set that has to be honed every time your on the bike.

If it sounds like i feel that everyone is out there to get me.. Well, its kept me alive so far. I do enjoy the ride. I just dont trust the lot out there as far as i can toss them..

With all the technological advances out there you would think we would be safer out there. Actually, its the other way around in regards to decreasing the driver focus...

Rabid rant over..
Be safe..
Mikey
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Old 01-26-2012, 09:42 PM   #819
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Commanderkewl View Post
Not everyone knows their limitations.. Even in a car...Think about it.. How many teenagers practice panic stops? How many drivers/riders are aware of their braking performance at speed? Those distances im talking about can close up in a heartbeat.
Situational awareness is a huge skill set that has to be honed every time your on the bike.
Good point! I never used to keep my bike in first gear when stopped at intersections without a vehicle lined up behind me, but then a girl on her phone almost hit me from behind. I panicked and slammed it into first and moved to the right just in time. That was not a fun feeling. She was coming up FAST!
I was ready to throw the finger, but she appologized and that kinda deterred me from doing so.. She was also pretty cute. I hope she now looks out for bikes on the road! Prolly not.
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:25 PM   #820
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Originally Posted by Commanderkewl View Post
Good postings on the subject.
.
How many of you out there, having had to travel in traffic, maintaining the distances needed, have found someone up your proverbial backside? How many of us recognized it in time to avert disaster?

Not everyone knows their limitations.. Even in a car...Think about it.. How many teenagers practice panic stops? How many drivers/riders are aware of their braking performance at speed? Those distances im talking about can close up in a heartbeat.
Situational awareness is a huge skill set that has to be honed every time your on the bike.

Rabid rant over..
Be safe..
Mikey
+1 Panic stops on a bike for a beginner can be messy.
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Old 02-06-2012, 09:25 PM   #821
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Sometimes clarity is needed.

Sometimes you need to cut through the bullsh*t and get to the core of things.

So - while I'm not out to offend anyone, or diminish any of the wisdom that has gone before, here's one take on it:




Have Fun





Don't Die







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Old 02-06-2012, 09:57 PM   #822
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^^ what he said.

ditto.
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Old 02-16-2012, 06:55 AM   #823
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Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
You keep parroting this. Why? It is not true for many (most) car/bike comparisons.

Yes there are many cars that can stop shorter than many bikes. But there are Many bikes that stop shorter than Most cars as well.

I agree with the different mind-set aspect but lets leave the car/bike braking for another thread.
True stopping distance is good for another thread and while that may be true under ideal conditions we are talking about new riders. I doubt a noob can stop a bike as quickly and effectively without going down and may venture out leaving the same space he or she is used to in a car. So my advice is to leave more room than you would in a car, at least until your skills improve.
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Old 02-17-2012, 06:48 PM   #824
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Yes there are many cars that can stop shorter than many bikes. But there are Many bikes that stop shorter than Most cars as well.

I agree with the different mind-set aspect but lets leave the car/bike braking for another thread.
I think that'd make a nice thread... I suspect cars usually do stop much quicker than bikes. I've tested my mum's modern-but-cheap car and the brakes are bloody good! Slam that pedal to the floor at highway speed and I'm pressed against the seatbelt so hard it almost hurts. There is no way my KTM with it's fancy brembos and steel braided lines can pull up that quick, it'd throw me over the handlebars instead, or lock up if I stuck my arse out over the tail end.

I'm sure a long bike with weight low down (cruiser?) would do much better, but mum's car is hardly the best out there... with it's semi-offroad suspension and dual-purpose gravel/highway tyres.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:56 AM   #825
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I think that'd make a nice thread... I suspect cars usually do stop much quicker than bikes. I've tested my mum's modern-but-cheap car and the brakes are bloody good! Slam that pedal to the floor at highway speed and I'm pressed against the seatbelt so hard it almost hurts. There is no way my KTM with it's fancy brembos and steel braided lines can pull up that quick, it'd throw me over the handlebars instead, or lock up if I stuck my arse out over the tail end.

I'm sure a long bike with weight low down (cruiser?) would do much better, but mum's car is hardly the best out there... with it's semi-offroad suspension and dual-purpose gravel/highway tyres.
I still disagree.

Your mom's car most likely has ABS... even if you lock up the wheels it'll stop safely.
Your bike most likely does not... most people don't brake as ferociously as possible because they don't want to drop their bike.

EDIT: I'm not saying ABS stops you faster, I'm saying it keeps most people from pushing the limits.
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