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Old 12-07-2012, 06:25 AM   #1156
slide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
English please. :
He means dirt riding for older folks starting out will cripple them every time.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:50 AM   #1157
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Originally Posted by swann View Post
As a total noob, here's what I learned about filling the gasoline tank on a motorcycle. Fortunately, I read lots of embarrassing stories so I didn't have to learn the embarrassing/painful/expensive way.

1. Get close to the pump.
2. Put your kickstand down.
3. Shut off your bike and open up the gas cap using your key.
4. Carefully put the gas cap down on something clean (or key side down) where it won't fall and roll away.
5. If you have a tank bag, you might want to remove it until you've filled your tank a couple times so you're sure you won't spray or dribble gas on it. Along this line, you may want to stand off the bike while filling it until you're sure you won't spill gas on your seat area - guys have reported gas in the undies is very painful.
6. Reset trip odometer if you don't have a gas tank guage.
7. Watch closely as you pump the gas in - unlike filling a car, you'll have to hold the handle the whole time. The flow should automatically shut off if the tip of the nozzle starts to get covered in gas. If it has a fuel vapor recovery slinky sleeve, you may need to crinkle it up with your non-filling hand so you can see how full the tank is.
8. Fill the tank almost full but leave a little room at the top so you don't accidentally overfill it, or slosh it if you bump your bike.
9. Slowly pull the nozzle out and give it a tiny shake to get any loose drops off so you don't dribble on your bike (or tank bag). Some people have recommended carrying a small towel to wipe any spills off the bike's finish.
10. Securely refasten the gas tank cap. Replace tank bag. Double check that you reset the trip odometer.
This is great advice for tourers, but for commuters - have your debit card ready (you don't need to carry it in your wallet where it is difficult to get to if you have a motorcycle jacket or pants with zippered pockets that you wear every day... I have two sets of gear depending on the time of year, so it isn't that hard to remember to switch the debit card over to the new jacket's pockets) so that you don't have to get off of the bike. When commuting, or just not needing to stretch in general, you can fill a bike up more (some bikes a lot more) when they are upright with you on them.

I've also had a bike that would leak fuel out of vents if filled to where it looked full while on its kickstand. That was a cruiser with its fuel cap off-center, so the fuel cap area of the tank was much higher than it would be once the bike was uprighted and rolling... and this led to seepage from the fuel cap as well.

I commuted about 22,000 miles for work last year on motorcycles, and I'd have to say that I got off of the bikes maybe three times to fill it up - and that was due to opening a new can of Sea Foam to put a little in the fuel, or forgetting my debit card and having to pay cash.
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:50 PM   #1158
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Having started motorcycling as an eleven year-old kid in 1966, who had been riding bicycles since a few years before that..... I cannot say that I remember what I wished I knew back then.

Maybe it was that my father had told me that the machine had several gears in my first lesson, instead of coming back a few minutes later and asking why I hadn't changed gear yet. That was my second and final lesson. It has all been the School of Hard Knocks since then, softened in those early days on the farm by spills into brambles and mud holes. With the exception of a couple of years when living in Japan, I have been riding ever since.

Where I live now (in Thailand), everyone rides from a young age, and it is also mostly the School of Hard Knocks, which sadly a few don't survive.

Going by what I see on forums, with a lot of people coming to motorcycling later in life, I reckon the thing they need to realise is that a motorcycle is not a car on two wheels. The dynamics of riding, and negotiating traffic are totally different.
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:12 AM   #1159
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don't use your mirrors
and if you feel the need to use them, know damn well what's going on in front of you
i'm not saying don't look in them; Do… but no longer than a split second.
If you're having trouble processing what you say in that second, repeat; but never stare

i missed a left hand turn once while checking if the guys in my group were keeping up;
this turned out to be a game of chicken between me in the wrong lane and an RV
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:44 AM   #1160
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Slow down when the car in front of you slows down.
Do not assume a car starts to drive slower to allow you to pass it very fast.

There's a reason he slows down - either there's an obstacle you haven't seen yet, he's looking for a parking space and will stop, or make a sudden u-turn. Make sure you know what it is before you try to overtake him.

Too many drivers crash or even kill themselves because they are in a hurry and immediately pass a car that slows down.
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:56 AM   #1161
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aj Mick View Post
Going by what I see on forums, with a lot of people coming to motorcycling later in life, I reckon the thing they need to realise is that a motorcycle is not a car on two wheels. The dynamics of riding, and negotiating traffic are totally different.
Very true. Indeed, motorcycling is NOT (primarily) a mode of transport! It is a"sport" and to be good at any sport you have to know the rules and practice, practice, practice.......

Cheers and enjoy the ride.
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:03 AM   #1162
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Originally Posted by Ahboon View Post
Very true. Indeed, motorcycling is (primarily) a mode of transport and to be good at it you have to know the rules and practice, practice, practice.......
Edited

If you are not competing then riding is not a sport.
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:07 AM   #1163
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Originally Posted by tommyvdv View Post
don't use your mirrors
Bad advice.

USE THEM MIRRORS and know what is going on back there!

(Just don't be stupid about it)
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:25 AM   #1164
Craneguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Edited



If you are not competing then riding is not a sport.
I always wondered about this comment. If golf is a sport, what is it if you're playing alone? (apart from a good walk spoiled?) :)
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:07 AM   #1165
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyvdv View Post
don't use your mirrors
and if you feel the need to use them, know damn well what's going on in front of you
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Bad advice.

USE THEM MIRRORS and know what is going on back there!

(Just don't be stupid about it)
I agree, that's really bad advice.

Use your mirrors often,but quickly, as tommy goes on to say. You should always know who's behind you- left, right, and center- and whether they're gaining on you.

The problem of nearly clipping someone in front of you when you glance in your mirror comes from following too closely.

..........shu
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:20 PM   #1166
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goin fast is easy. stopping is the hardest thing to do on a motorcycle...think about that EVERY time you wind on the throttle.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:22 PM   #1167
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mirrors only say "NO"...they can never say "YES"
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Old 12-10-2012, 08:04 PM   #1168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DAKEZ View Post
Care to elaborate?

"I'm not picking up what your laying down man"
It makes sense. A check of a mirror can confirm there is something in a lane that you may want to change to, so that you can rely on (to decide to NOT change lanes), but checking your mirrors and seeing nothing there is by no means a good enough check to change lanes in and of itself.

Twisting one's neck, head and even upper torso (if need be) to put eyes on each lane change is very nearly a motorcycle requirement. So much so that you will see guys who were raised with motorcycles doing it while driving cages for that extra safety factor. It drives non-motorcyclists nuts that the driver is looking around behind them while driving at speed, but it's a good enough habit that it's not worth getting rid of it even if a driver is talented with his mirrors.

This is also why a neutral-riding motorcycle is probably the best type for street use and commuting. Some cruisers and even more sport bikes put the head and neck in positions that, while totally do-able, make it a pain and/or takes more time (like, milliseconds, sure, but more time) to do the swing-around look. I've owned all three - the cruiser that had my upper-torso leaned back (the worst for a mobile head for lane checks), a ZX-7R that had my upper-torso leaned forward (doing head-checks required semi-contortionism, or looking up under my arm, or letting go of a clip-on to spin the torso and that arm around - I loved the bike and had no trouble doing any of them, but I'm admitting that it wasn't as easy or quick as a J.U.M.), and an old Japanese Universal Motorcycle (and now this DR650) that make head-spinning the easiest.

Mambo Dave screwed with this post 12-10-2012 at 08:19 PM
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:01 AM   #1169
tommyvdv
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Originally Posted by shu View Post
I agree, that's really bad advice.

Use your mirrors often,but quickly, as tommy goes on to say. You should always know who's behind you- left, right, and center- and whether they're gaining on you.

The problem of nearly clipping someone in front of you when you glance in your mirror comes from following too closely.

..........shu
I agree, not checking your mirrors is awful advice. (i was trying to make a point, but i may have messed up the way i went about it)
I've learned a bit about myself since i started riding/driving.

I'm absolutely obsessed with what's behind me. And every time i get myself into a pickle it's due to knowing all too well what's behind me, at the cost of not knowing what's in front of me. And following too close is something i avoid at all costs. One second of staring in the mirrors means you've ignored the road in front for about 30 meters (depending on your speed at the time). Sometimes you should've used that distance to stop, instead of stare at what's behind you.

In road in front is more important than the road you've covered.
That doesn't mean you don't need to check your back.

Check your back if you can afford to take your eyes off the road.
And if you do take your eyes off the road; keep it brief.

Hope that'll clear it up :)
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:12 AM   #1170
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I'm with the no mirrors boys on this one. To me they're a supplement. If you can't turn your head and take a look then you need more practice. They're like indicators/blinkers - you should know how to indicate a manoeuvre without them, same as you should have a level of awareness of what's around you without mirrors. Once you can do that, then I'd suggest you're good to go with mirrors.

If you can't do a decent lifesaver (the look over the shoulder before switching lanes or overtaking) then you need more off road (parking lot etc) practice.

Same rule applies to driving a car btw.

Worth remembering that mirrors are pretty easy to break - if you can't ride safely without them.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyvdv View Post
I agree, not checking your mirrors is awful advice. (i was trying to make a point, but i may have messed up the way i went about it)
I've learned a bit about myself since i started riding/driving.

I'm absolutely obsessed with what's behind me. And every time i get myself into a pickle it's due to knowing all too well what's behind me, at the cost of not knowing what's in front of me. And following too close is something i avoid at all costs. One second of staring in the mirrors means you've ignored the road in front for about 30 meters (depending on your speed at the time). Sometimes you should've used that distance to stop, instead of stare at what's behind you.

In road in front is more important than the road you've covered.
That doesn't mean you don't need to check your back.

Check your back if you can afford to take your eyes off the road.
And if you do take your eyes off the road; keep it brief.

Hope that'll clear it up :)
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