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Old 04-12-2010, 02:09 AM   #16
LeftCoastMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut
Yikes, chill out, dude. I wasn't asking for treatment information, I have my doctor, my endocrinologist, and my nutritionist for that, and I've been successfully gotten things under control over the last 6 months.

What I was asking was about practical aspects of diabetes and motorcycle trips. The comment about keeping my Levemir pen cold was just the sort of thing I was hoping for - here in the Northwet that's never a problem and I wouldn't have ever thought of it, but now I know it's something to prepare for.

As someone relatively new to the disease and new to long motorcycle tours, I just want to be prepared. And this forum is a great place for practical advice. Medical advice I go elsewhere for.

Tom
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Old 04-12-2010, 02:12 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxcoop
just an fyi....until last year pharmacists in PA could sell insulin without a prescription, but could NOT sell syringes with out one. "here's your insulin sir. syringes ? oh, i'm sorry, i can't sell those to you." an added caveat, always check the laws where you are traveling or be 'self-contained'......

also, i thought those california folks (i.e. leftcoastman) were supposed to be laid back. he writes like he's from jersey...
Lived too long in NY, I suppose.

Syringe "prescriptions" are strict in most states. Here in California, the State Board of Pharmacy considers syringes no different than Class 2 drugs.
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Old 04-12-2010, 02:16 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markcap
To the dude with the initial question, my advice, get in shape and eat smart. And be prepared for the outdoors away from home.
Well, if you're going to say that, let me say:

Type I diabetes is a physiological condition that is not caused by a lifestyle. It's just bad genes or something. Type II diabetes results from bad living, and is completely reversible (mostly).
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Old 04-12-2010, 07:16 AM   #19
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glad you added "mostly".....mine is subsequent to a kidney transplant almost 15 yrs ago. there isnt' anything i can do other than to take care of myself as long as possible in order to stay off insulin (am at the oral plus byetta stage now)....
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Old 04-13-2010, 10:10 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxcoop
glad you added "mostly".....mine is subsequent to a kidney transplant almost 15 yrs ago. there isnt' anything i can do other than to take care of myself as long as possible in order to stay off insulin (am at the oral plus byetta stage now)....
I should have stated that Type II is "mostly" a result of bad lifestyle choices.

There are so many "easy" lifestyle choices you can make to help your condition. Good, long, hard cardiovascular exercise every day. Eat high fiber carbs, like brown rice, whole wheat. No beer (sorry, that would be hard). Ok, not so easy!

Anyways, you've done a good job for 15 years. You probably will live to 97!
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Old 04-13-2010, 12:29 PM   #21
Lobby
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I have Type II.

Low blood sugar is "never" a problem for me. Remember, Type II occurs when your body becomes resistant to the insulin it produces. Unlike Type I, where the body doesn't produce insulin.

You'll find on a long motorcycle trip, that high blood sugar (from eating badly and not exercising) is the problem. Not low blood sugar.

Take your blood glucose meter, if you want to keep checking. I don't take mine while traveling. I can control it with meds and eating.
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Old 04-13-2010, 12:43 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobby
I have Type II.

Low blood sugar is "never" a problem for me. Remember, Type II occurs when your body becomes resistant to the insulin it produces. Unlike Type I, where the body doesn't produce insulin.

You'll find on a long motorcycle trip, that high blood sugar (from eating badly and not exercising) is the problem. Not low blood sugar.

Take your blood glucose meter, if you want to keep checking. I don't take mine while traveling. I can control it with meds and eating.
Type II definitely doesn't manifest itself in low blood sugar. However, if you're on medication, it can cause a hypoglycemia if taken incorrectly. For example, if you take the pills first thing in the morning and don't eat enough, you could end up with really low blood sugar, which is not good for riding.
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Old 04-13-2010, 01:00 PM   #23
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Type 2 diabetes has a genetic component. But for most it also has a lifestyle component. I was somewhat fortunate to have experienced chest pains about a year and ago. I went in to have them checked out. Nothing came of that. My heart is fine, but I got the, "You have elevated blood sugar levels" speech. It turns out I was just below where they would have officially diagnosed me with type 2.

So I read up on the topic and found out that unless you get the blood sugar under control and back to normal levels most of the time, your progression to complications is almost inevitable.

I am not particularly afraid of dying, but the idea of being blind or losing my foot is not appealing. So I went on Atkins immediately and started doing 40-minute workouts on exercise bikes about 4-5 days a week. I started riding bicycles more. Incidentally I started riding motorcycles too.

Eating is very important to me and I did not want to have to be on permanent dietary restrictions because of type 2. So I changed my lifestyle. I lost 75 pounds and now my blood sugar level is rock solid normal pretty much all the time. My last two A1c were 5.8.

So you can do it. I cannot give advice on how to manage type 2 on a ride. If you have it bad, it can only suck to have to find the right things to eat. My strategy was to cure it. My doctor can't stop going on about how amazed he is that I did it. Apparently most people blow him off and just want meds. I am actually happy that I got the diagnosis. I was able to stop being a fat bastard and get semi-hot again.

Good luck to those of you who are less fortunate. Living with type 1 must be pure hell.
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Old 04-13-2010, 03:42 PM   #24
Kieth
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Type 2 diabetes

I developed type 2 diabetes was in the hospital and was told I could not go to Baja in 5 weeks. I told them I would be ready to go and they would approve . They said no way..............I have been to baja, copper canyon, the trans am trail, and the continental divide and more.....

Very simply do what they tell you, I even beat them at their own game.

1. Keep a log religiously so you know your own body better than they do.

2. Eat low carb.................keep your blood sugar low,

3. take you medicine on time.......

4. take some candy, protein bars, etc with you.

5. take your blood sugr at the same time 3 times a day and try to eat the same thing for each meal........

6. My blood sugar is at about 95 to 105 in the morning before I eat breakfast.

My blood sugar is at about 90 to 100 at 10:30 in the mid morning.

My blood sugar is at about 105 before dinner.

My blood sugar is at about 100 before going to bed.

Work at it , it can be done and you are the only one who can do it. Kieth
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Old 04-13-2010, 07:06 PM   #25
Lobby
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoastMan
Type II definitely doesn't manifest itself in low blood sugar. However, if you're on medication, it can cause a hypoglycemia if taken incorrectly. For example, if you take the pills first thing in the morning and don't eat enough, you could end up with really low blood sugar, which is not good for riding.

Yeah. I should have qualified that.

Some medications DO cause your blood glucose levels to drop, should you not eat at the right times.

I only take Actos (and chromium picolinate) and don't suffer from low blood glucose levels.

Thank God.
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Old 04-16-2010, 06:14 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daq7
Good luck to those of you who are less fortunate. Living with type 1 must be pure hell.
I wouldn't call it pure hell but living with Type 1 is simply a challenge that effects each one of us differently. It makes for a life in which has priorities most others never need to ever consider. But I seem to do ok with it and I am currently looking for a neat 10-13 day ride i can ride this summer.
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Old 04-18-2010, 11:48 AM   #27
LeftCoastMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobby
Yeah. I should have qualified that.

Some medications DO cause your blood glucose levels to drop, should you not eat at the right times.

I only take Actos (and chromium picolinate) and don't suffer from low blood glucose levels.

Thank God.
Thank medicine.
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Old 04-18-2010, 11:50 AM   #28
LeftCoastMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markcap
I wouldn't call it pure hell but living with Type 1 is simply a challenge that effects each one of us differently. It makes for a life in which has priorities most others never need to ever consider. But I seem to do ok with it and I am currently looking for a neat 10-13 day ride i can ride this summer.
I agree. I think there are Type I diabetics playing professional sports. It's a chronic disease that can be managed with drugs, diet, exercise, and obsessive behavior. I think there are no limitations to what you can do in life. :)
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Old 04-18-2010, 03:36 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut
I was recently diagnosed with Type II diabetes and am planning a 3 week trip through the SW in May and I'm wondering how any other diabetics deal with the disease?

I've got it well managed but still take Levimir each night and pills in the morning. I guess what I'm most concerned about is not letting my b/s drop too far while riding and not noticing it. I've been doing some 200+ mile rides when the weather permits and find myself pushing it to far because I'm not feeling the drop until I stop. And I'm not drinking enough while riding.

I'll be bringing my large Camelback for fluids - just water or add something to it? What sort of snacks and travel foods have you found to be good? I work at a natural foods grocery so I'm used to just snacking as needed from the store, but this is definitely going to require some planning.

BTW, I'm planning on staying on pavement and motelling it each night, that should simplify things a bit, but any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Tom
Lots of advice, here's my $.02.

If you are a indoor person without a lot of outside activity's, I would carry your meter with you on the first trip. Check yourself every time you stop. "I know it will be a pain". After a couple of days you will recognize certain feelings with a blood sugar level.

Just remember,what feels like a low blood sugar level might just be a lower than normal level for you.
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Old 04-18-2010, 04:26 PM   #30
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I would look at something like this for you pens.

http://www.insulincase.com/Poucho-Co...llets-P62.aspx or this
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...Y5C6MKJSY34BDT

My Uncle was diabetic for years and used a similar setup, that my neighbor now uses with no issues. As long as you have it balanced and under control, just make sure to follow all your diet and dosing regimes. I regularly travel with my neighbor, who had ben diabetic since age 17, with the only problems being when he doesn't eat properly or doesn't use his insulin.
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