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Old 04-17-2010, 11:22 AM   #31
Powerslave
n00by tires that would be
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Location: Nuevo Mexico
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mathing set then?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motoriley
I've heard the V-Strom package is excellent but the chain is ugly.
So it looks just perfect on the bike then eh?
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Old 04-17-2010, 12:15 PM   #32
Powerslave
n00by tires that would be
 
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Location: Nuevo Mexico
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open ended rivets?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Z
http://www.sprocketcenter.com/

Or more specifically, http://www.sprocketcenter.com/p/1037...led-chain.html

Cheapest? I don't know. But I've dealt with Sprocket Center before, and have found good prices and good service.

Jamie
cant tell from pic and they are closed today - does anyone know if the DID are open ended master links ?
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Old 04-17-2010, 08:00 PM   #33
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If you just want to try the oiler idea without parting with cash try a old hand soap dispenser. I've used it a few times on my KLR ( insert KLR owner joke here...) when I know I'm going to be clocking the miles on a long trip. I just zap strap it to the frame but maybe there is a good hiding spot on the Strom. The hose is cheap, any fuel line will work. I like the clear stuff.
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Old 04-18-2010, 05:11 AM   #34
stinkfinger
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Location: North Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Z

When my last chain wore out, I was riding with A1fa, and he saw how I lubed my chain. He said, "Man, you need to use a lot more than that." I was putting the chain on the center stand and spinning the rear wheel a few times and spraying the lube on from the back. I'd stop when I could see that the whole chain was wet. A1fa showed me his way, which was to put the bike on the center stand, start it, and put it in first gear. He'd let the bike spin the rear tire and spray lube all over the chain until it was dripping off. I've used his method for this most recent chain, and I do it every fillup, or roughly 250 miles.

Jamie
I think the best bet is;
1-proper align/sprockets,
2-spray chain with water hose(not powerwasher)while turning wheel to get out the dirt and sand during cleaning(this can take a while too as it just keeps coming out)
3- lube, concentrating on the "inside" of chain (after water has dried)
Centrifigul force is gonna push it to the "outside".

Tony
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Old 04-18-2010, 11:39 AM   #35
Motoriley
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Soap Dispenser

Nice idea. Going to look into that.



Quote:
Originally Posted by B.C.Biker
If you just want to try the oiler idea without parting with cash try a old hand soap dispenser. I've used it a few times on my KLR ( insert KLR owner joke here...) when I know I'm going to be clocking the miles on a long trip. I just zap strap it to the frame but maybe there is a good hiding spot on the Strom. The hose is cheap, any fuel line will work. I like the clear stuff.
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Old 04-26-2010, 01:49 PM   #36
Ramata
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamie Z

Chain lubers are expensive. Holy cow.

Jamie
Someone in a Colombian forum, made an automatic oiler using a vacuum operated valve (maybe as the gas tank petcock) to allow oil to pass from a plastic container to some tubing to the rear sprocket. It seemed to me like a neat (cheap) idea at the time.
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Old 12-17-2010, 09:36 AM   #37
allonsye
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Correct Chain Tension

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterhively View Post
40mm on the sidestand sounds reasonable, but you need to double check it loaded. The stock spec may not be OK with the links.

Get a big fat buddy to sit on your bike, maybe two of em, and check the tension...it may be very tight.

When your shock is compressed enough that the front sprocket, swingarm pivot, and rear sprocket line up, the chain will be about as tight as it is gonna get. You need to have a little free play at that point. Once you have a little slack fully loaded, see how much slack you have with the bike on the stand and make note of it. That's your setting from now on.

Also, there are several levels of RK chains, some of em not so hot.

Peter
Right on The Suzuki MOM recommendation is too tight in my humble opinion. Peter has it right. The pressures when in operation put against a chain, sprocket, drive axle from too tight a chain has got to be in the thousands of lbs and drive wear up exponentially.
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:12 PM   #38
BluByU
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Location: Lost in America
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Pro-Oiler All the Way

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skurj View Post
Anyone use the pro-oiler?
Yep I have, best thing ever to prolong the life of a chain. Installed new DID X O ring chain new sprockets and Pro-Oiler kit on my old ZX11 went 30k miles before adjusting the chain (axel could come out for tire removal without messing with the adjusters) I ran Mobile 15w40 in the bike and in the Pro-Oiler.
I later gave the ZX11 to a good friend in need of a bike.
The current owner still has not adjusted the chain yet. The chain has lasted 55k miles YES THATS NOT A TYPO 55 THOUSAND MILES! (mostly highway miles)

If I had a chained bike, you can bet money I would have a Pro-Oiler on it.
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Old 12-19-2010, 12:43 AM   #39
boingk
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1: Never lube the outside of a chain, always lube the inside.

2: Lube frequently. Every 100 miles kinda frequently.

3: Ensure the above by using a Tutoro chain oiler:



I've had this on my bike for around 1000 miles and haven't needed a chain adjustment since. Its a simple gravity feed system and you can use any sort of oil you like - I use regular 10W-40 engine oil as I run my bikes on it and always have some around. It mounts with clipties and you position the twin-headed oil feed like so on the rear sprocket:



Best part is that its also very cheap - less than $40 shipped. Check them out on eBay or tutorochainoiler.com

Cheers - boingk

PS: My uncle rides an FJR1300 and uses a chain oiler with DID chains. He got over 50,000km out of his last chain.
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Old 12-19-2010, 02:08 AM   #40
gn77b
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I don't have any scientific reasoning for this but I would stop using teflon based lubes and switch to lubrication with transmission oil (using a brush or automatic). I'm beginning to think teflon lubes are the biggest fraud mankind has ever come up with.
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Old 12-19-2010, 07:22 AM   #41
Laconic
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I bought my first chain driven bike in a long time back in July. The prevailing wisdom at the time was to use the Dupont Teflon Dry Wax spray. I've been giving the chain a good soaking every 300 to 500 miles. It has over 8000 miles on it now and I can't see anything wrong with the chain or sprockets. I have cleaned it twice using diesel fuel and an old sock. All in all it's been pretty pain-free.

But I don't like the way it sounds going down the road; it always sounds "dry". Being a mechanic by trade, that really bothers me.

The spray lube is keeping the chain clean and rust free, but is it really "lubricating" it, as in, is it keeping the load bearing points from making metal to metal contact with each other? I think not.

The other day we were replacing a pump at work and were packing the coupling with a special grease for the application called "Falk LTG (Long Term Grease). This stuff is designed to resist separating under centrifugal force; it works so well that it eliminates the need for regular servicing of the coupling, as long as the seals don't leak. This grease is so tacky and sticky that you can hardly get it off of anything without a solvent of some type.

So, what we have is a grease that won't sling all over the place and won't separate. I think some MC manufacturers owners manuals call for lubing the chain with a Lithium based grease, and some (like the Suzuki in question), call for multi-vis engine oil. Yes, it will attract dirt, but so will any other oil or grease. The difference is, the LTG should stay put.

Even though I don't want the added hassle it will bring, I'm very close to giving it a try.
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Old 12-19-2010, 07:56 AM   #42
Motoriley
Even my posing is virtual
 
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Joined: Feb 2003
Location: Deepest darkest burbs of Montreal
Oddometer: 2,670
Grease

The first time you hit sand that grease is going to make an abrasive paste and your chain will be history pretty quick.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 257bob View Post
I bought my first chain driven bike in a long time back in July. The prevailing wisdom at the time was to use the Dupont Teflon Dry Wax spray. I've been giving the chain a good soaking every 300 to 500 miles. It has over 8000 miles on it now and I can't see anything wrong with the chain or sprockets. I have cleaned it twice using diesel fuel and an old sock. All in all it's been pretty pain-free.

But I don't like the way it sounds going down the road; it always sounds "dry". Being a mechanic by trade, that really bothers me.

The spray lube is keeping the chain clean and rust free, but is it really "lubricating" it, as in, is it keeping the load bearing points from making metal to metal contact with each other? I think not.

The other day we were replacing a pump at work and were packing the coupling with a special grease for the application called "Falk LTG (Long Term Grease). This stuff is designed to resist separating under centrifugal force; it works so well that it eliminates the need for regular servicing of the coupling, as long as the seals don't leak. This grease is so tacky and sticky that you can hardly get it off of anything without a solvent of some type.

So, what we have is a grease that won't sling all over the place and won't separate. I think some MC manufacturers owners manuals call for lubing the chain with a Lithium based grease, and some (like the Suzuki in question), call for multi-vis engine oil. Yes, it will attract dirt, but so will any other oil or grease. The difference is, the LTG should stay put.

Even though I don't want the added hassle it will bring, I'm very close to giving it a try.
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:00 AM   #43
Motoriley
Even my posing is virtual
 
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Location: Deepest darkest burbs of Montreal
Oddometer: 2,670
Chain Oiler

Looks like a cheap alternative to the other oilers except if you forget to turn it off it will drain out on your garage floor....


Quote:
Originally Posted by boingk View Post
1: Never lube the outside of a chain, always lube the inside.

2: Lube frequently. Every 100 miles kinda frequently.

3: Ensure the above by using a Tutoro chain oiler:



I've had this on my bike for around 1000 miles and haven't needed a chain adjustment since. Its a simple gravity feed system and you can use any sort of oil you like - I use regular 10W-40 engine oil as I run my bikes on it and always have some around. It mounts with clipties and you position the twin-headed oil feed like so on the rear sprocket:



Best part is that its also very cheap - less than $40 shipped. Check them out on eBay or tutorochainoiler.com

Cheers - boingk

PS: My uncle rides an FJR1300 and uses a chain oiler with DID chains. He got over 50,000km out of his last chain.
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Color tube TV, Microwave Oven (yes she rotates!),Washer & Dryer,Paved Driveway,
Website - http://www.apormc.com/
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:19 AM   #44
Hans-NL
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Joined: Jan 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skurj View Post
Anyone use the pro-oiler?
My girlfriend and I use the Pro-Olier system on our Honda VFR's. It's not cheap, but it's "fire and forget". The lifetime of the chain and sprockets double (at least) and we ended up replacing the front sprocket first and then the whole chain and rear sprocket as soon as we have to change the front one again. (so it's 2 front sprockets on 1 chain and rear sprocket)

The system doesn't leak when you turn off your bike and I top off the oil resevoir every time we have to change the engine oil. Just fill it with the leftover (clean) engine oil and it will run fine.

I have a BMW now, so I don't need a lube system, but if I ever buy a bike with a chain drive, the pro-oiler will be the first upgrade.

I don't know if Pro-oiler has a default setup for your bike, but just send Pablo a mail and jou can find out.
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Old 12-19-2010, 11:26 AM   #45
Laconic
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Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Moran Nation, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motoriley View Post
The first time you hit sand that grease is going to make an abrasive paste and your chain will be history pretty quick.

I have given that some thought and it's the one thing that really holds me back.

Question: Does sand stick to an oily chain? Seems to me the only thing sand (or anything else) wouldn't stick to is a dry chain.

What's the oiler going to do, add enough oil to keep debris flushed off? Sounds quite messy to me...
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