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Old 05-28-2011, 04:58 AM   #91
Antti
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Pro-oiler just works. New nozzle once a year and keep it filled with engine oil.
Any temperature or oil viscosity doesn't matter. I have used it from -27 to 35C degs. And can be easily adjusted while driving.
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Old 05-29-2011, 03:45 AM   #92
PeterW
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Hard to beat a small petrol engine primer (squishy button) a 250ml bottle and some PVC tubing plumbed up to drop oil on the FRONT sprocket.

The primer is mounted on a convenient panel, a small push and a few drops of oil go onto the chain. Since it drops on to the front sprocket there's no oil splatter on the rear tire.

Uses ~250ml of oil every 20,000km ;)

O.K. I do have to remember to push the button now and then, but that's no big deal - has most of the advantages of an auto chain oiler with none of the downsides. i.e. it's positive pressure, I don't push the button, no oil comes out - so no dumping the entire bottle of oil on the ground - or on the rear tire. Need more lube ?, press the button harder.

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Old 05-29-2011, 04:02 PM   #93
10/10ths
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Scottoiler eSystem......

...just installed new chain and sprockets on my V-Strom 650 and I installed the new Scottoiler eSystem.

It is fantastic.

It is controlled by a computer that has a three-axis accelerometer and it senses when the engine is running, when the bike is moving, and how fast the bike is traveling.

It meters out the oil based upon bike speed and motion.

It drops more all at higher speed, less oil at lower speed, and stops oiling when you come to a stop. You can manually override the flow rate and program the system to match your bike, and your preferences.

It does NOT drip oil on my garage floor.

I've only had it on the bike long enough for one nine hour test ride, but from what I have seen so far, it is an extremely well thought out and engineered system.

I bought the extended reservoir "lube tube" and it appears that I will be able to ride for about 6,000 miles before having to refill this thing.

She's a tad spendy, but the value in ease of use, eliminating time spent lubing, and perfect oiling execution, leads me to believe that this system is worth every penny.

Cheers.
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Old 05-29-2011, 07:08 PM   #94
gweaver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterW View Post
Hard to beat a small petrol engine primer (squishy button) a 250ml bottle and some PVC tubing plumbed up to drop oil on the FRONT sprocket.

Pete
Don't suppose you could come up with some sort of diagram or something? I can visualize the bottle and tubing to the sprocket, but how's the primer button plumbed in? The one's I'm familiar with are simply a bulb with no back. Got a link to an example? And then does that plumb in to the back of the bottle?

Thanks,
G
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Old 05-30-2011, 09:09 AM   #95
xcgates
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One idea I liked was using an old-style oil pump can, and a length of tubing that ended in a partially crushed piece of copper tubing.

I know that's not a good description, but it's the best I can come up with right now.
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Old 05-31-2011, 03:29 PM   #96
allonsye
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Chain Oiler

What ever application/installation one uses or invents, it's well worth the effort and investment in my humble opinion. As I've said in the thread before, one of the least things I care to do at the end or the beginning of the day when I'm on a long-distance tour, is having to muck around w/chain lubing what w/all the other things to deal w/when traveling away from home.
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Old 05-31-2011, 06:19 PM   #97
xcgates
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DamnyoualltoH-E-doublehockesticks!!!!

I was perfectly happy squirting on the teflon chain lube until yesterday.

Now I'm looking at ~$200 for a new chain and set of sprockets. I figure that if I'm planning on keeping the bike for more than 14k more miles (two service intervals) it will pay off getting one and switching to an oil chain lube.

Hadn't quite realized how much a pain in the ass it can be when I'm too lazy to be constantly maintaining the chain. (First bike with a chain) Ignored the chain for a good 1.5k - 2k miles except for an occasional squirt with the generic Teflon lube, and I now have the horror of a having to tighten the chain. The horror.
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Old 06-01-2011, 02:31 AM   #98
PeterW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gweaver View Post
Don't suppose you could come up with some sort of diagram or something? I can visualize the bottle and tubing to the sprocket, but how's the primer button plumbed in? The one's I'm familiar with are simply a bulb with no back. Got a link to an example? And then does that plumb in to the back of the bottle?

Thanks,
G
There are photos on VSRI somewhere. I couldn't find them quickly the other day or I'd have linked them.

ASCII art Front sprocket ------------------Primer---------Bottle-----air vent


The primers have a squishy plastic button on top, at the back two tubes and markings saying "in" and "out". Most places that repair small motors will have complete primers in stock as spares.

"out" side goes to a hose which feeds into a hole drilled into my front sprocket cover.

"in" side goes into one hole in the top of the bottle and goes to near the bottom of the bottle. Just drill two holes in the cap slightly too tight and force the tubing through.

There's another hole in the cap which has a piece of hose fed in just through the top and leads up up high somewhere with some open cell foam stuffed in the end - just to let air into the system.

Hardly ever needs filling, and since I got the doses right doesn't drip on the floor.

Simple and as bulletproof as I've seen. Electronics is nice and all, but this doesn't need that complexity.

Pete
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Old 02-05-2012, 12:52 PM   #99
irishdec
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Bluhduh Forget the oiler

Just use WD40 ,no mess ,carry a can anywhere -or buy it anywhere- I've used it for four years now ,put plenty of mileage up .prob.20k ,havent even had to tighten the chain once.
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Old 02-06-2012, 05:17 AM   #100
ec90t
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I use a pro-oiler on my Vee and couldn't be happier. 20K miles and the chain and sprocket are still like new. I can adjust the flow with a single push of the button and forget about it the rest of the time. I did a bit of a write-up about the install on stromtrooper a while back.
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Old 11-13-2012, 11:55 AM   #101
dennism
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[QUOTE=PeterW;16054941]There are photos on VSRI somewhere. I couldn't find them quickly the other day or I'd have linked them.

Here is the explanation. http://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,10708.0.html

This is the way I'm going to make mine. Thanks! Dennis.
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Old 11-15-2012, 04:14 AM   #102
espacef1fan
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Scottoiler guys, What about "chain fling" how bad (or not bad) is it. I'm currently using Maxima Chain Wax with good luck. How good is the scott oiler at keeping things clean?
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Old 11-17-2012, 01:51 PM   #103
pyoungbl
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I'm another Pro Oiler proponent. Why spend all that extra $$$ when other systems are cheaper? As others have said, it's fire and forget...but when you need to change the delivery due to dust/ rain/ whatever you can do so on the fly. Something that has not been said is that the Pro Oiler ECU has a logic circuit to automatically dial back the delivery when you are at a steady speed for a long time. This keeps from over lubricating and creating a big mess. Also, since the delivery is on the rear sprocket it is less prone to making a mess (unlike the wick method). Finally, Pro Oiler delivery is geared to distance, not time. When you are poking along at 35 mph the chain is getting the same lubrication (per ft of chain) as at 70 mph, not so with the steady drip method where you are almost over or under lubricating the chain. I have a Pro Oiler on my third chain drive bike. The two previous Ducatis got well over 25K miles on a chain and sprockets. I changed well before needed only because I was starting long trips and don't like to go on a 6-8K mile trip where I might have to replace chain/sprockets. I find that I can go from east coast to west coast with one fill of ATF in the oiler, that's about 250ml. I use ATF because it is a good rust preventer, slings off (taking grit with it), and is cheap.
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Old 11-17-2012, 07:24 PM   #104
espacef1fan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pyoungbl View Post
I'm another Pro Oiler proponent. Why spend all that extra $$$ when other systems are cheaper? As others have said, it's fire and forget...but when you need to change the delivery due to dust/ rain/ whatever you can do so on the fly. Something that has not been said is that the Pro Oiler ECU has a logic circuit to automatically dial back the delivery when you are at a steady speed for a long time. This keeps from over lubricating and creating a big mess. Also, since the delivery is on the rear sprocket it is less prone to making a mess (unlike the wick method). Finally, Pro Oiler delivery is geared to distance, not time. When you are poking along at 35 mph the chain is getting the same lubrication (per ft of chain) as at 70 mph, not so with the steady drip method where you are almost over or under lubricating the chain. I have a Pro Oiler on my third chain drive bike. The two previous Ducatis got well over 25K miles on a chain and sprockets. I changed well before needed only because I was starting long trips and don't like to go on a 6-8K mile trip where I might have to replace chain/sprockets. I find that I can go from east coast to west coast with one fill of ATF in the oiler, that's about 250ml. I use ATF because it is a good rust preventer, slings off (taking grit with it), and is cheap.
How bad was the mess on the wheel/body work with the ATF? How bad did dirt and atfg pool up inside chain guard and CS sprocket? Any oil run off the bottom of the engine?
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Old 11-18-2012, 07:45 AM   #105
concours
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As mentioned above, here is your primer for oiling. Ingeniously simple and effective.

https://www.denniskirk.com/llp-mfg/p...ontent=Default
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