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Old 01-28-2015, 12:35 PM   #1
Prmurat OP
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What's the use?

I keep on seeing sidecars mounted to some "adventure/Dual sports" bikes where the bike has around 8 inches of ground clearance and the sidecar around 14....Is there a reason?? ('cause it is ugly as hell and not confidence inspiring! )
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Old 01-28-2015, 12:41 PM   #2
usgser
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Is America, buy/build/ride what you like.
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Old 01-28-2015, 12:49 PM   #3
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One place I like having the clearance with the sidecar is when running on a rutted road. Often when I am in an off pavement environment inevitably trucks have dug heavy ruts that are spaced wrong for the track width of the sidecar so I end up driving with the sidecar in one rut and the bike on top, the electric trim option goes a little way's towards leveling the bike out.
Also if there is a rock in the road steer around it with the bike and let the sidecar go over it.
As a side benefit, having the sidecar up higher also puts your passenger up higher which many people prefer.
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Old 01-28-2015, 04:06 PM   #4
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I have owned two rigs so far. One rig was very low (K75/Hannigan) and the other somewhat high (Ural Tourist) I also have experience as both rider and monkey. Mostly I am the rider, but sometimes my husband drives. Here is how I feel about it:

The Hannigan I had handled GREAT. Much better than the Ural. But the car was uncomfortable. It was so low that the passenger feels like they might bump their butt on the ground, I had a hard time sitting in that seat with my legs stretched out straight in front of me, and climbing in and out required more strength and agility than my creaky half-crippled body provides. Also, since I knew the passenger's butt was only about 3" off the ground, I would cringe every time I had to hit a pothole. And we have a LOT of potholes where I live. On-road here is like off-road in states where they actually maintain the roads.

The Ural is high up and the handling is, well, quirky. But the sidecar is far more comfortable to sit in, easier to get in and out, and as a monkey I just feel more involved and less like cargo. The overall effect is just more fun. Plus I feel comfortable bashing it over terrible surfaces.

This is why, when I was making the plans for my next rig, I decided to stay on the tall side. The Ural's handling isn't that big an issue, compared to the comfort and sociability questions.

Just my 2c.
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Old 01-28-2015, 04:54 PM   #5
davebig
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Philippe
Lower to the ground wide tires not much sway easier to drive fast.

More ground clearance sways more in turns not so easy to ride fast on pavement

I often think I may want shorter shocks on a GS based rig to lower ride height as it's difficult to find places to ride where all that ground clearance would be desirable where I live.DB
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Old 01-28-2015, 05:57 PM   #6
DRONE
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The clearance on the sidecar side is very useful. When barreling along a rough and rocky section you see a big nasty rock sticking up and have to make a quick decision. If I can get my right foot to pass to the left of the rock I know I'm good and don't even need to slow down. But if my front wheel hits that rock I'm gonna go up and over then the whole rig is gonna come down hard with the rock now right under the motor. That's bad.

See this? This is great! You can't go as fast on paved twisties but that's not what this rig is designed to do best--

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Old 01-28-2015, 06:08 PM   #7
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Hmmm Ned Phillipe owns a Ural There are lots of reasons to like GS's besides making them into enduro style sidecar rigs, they are excellent handlers and usually a good bit quicker to the 70 + mph than the RT or RS brethren. I have no idea what he has in mind but if you don't do off pavement a lower GS is a cool idea. DB
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Old 01-28-2015, 06:21 PM   #8
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I do get the road handling part: my Softail with a Companion GT is quite low and very stable at a faster pace than the Ural! I guess I want everything in the GS: fast and stable on freeway and twisties while able to swallow dirt and gravel roads!! Maybe I am a dreamer!!!


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Old 01-28-2015, 06:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prmurat View Post
Maybe I am a dreamer!!!


These are all the same bike and chair frame.

4 1/2 under the bike. 6 1/2 under the chair. Never a problem.

For reference, that's a 13" tyre on the chair.










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Old 01-28-2015, 07:28 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by FR700 View Post
These are all the same bike and chair frame.

4 1/2 under the bike. 6 1/2 under the chair. Never a problem.

For reference, that's a 13" tyre on the chair.











Very cool outfit? What are the cargo box dimensions?
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Old 01-28-2015, 07:57 PM   #11
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Very cool outfit? What are the cargo box dimensions?


No idea. The sidecar got sold.


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FR700 screwed with this post 01-28-2015 at 09:24 PM
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Old 01-29-2015, 05:55 AM   #12
GearHeadGrrrl
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Sometimes, you can't help it...

I've currently got the Motorvation Spyder hooded up to the R65LS, the lowest airhead made. Got about 4-5" clearance under the bike and 10" under the hack, as I've got an oversize 130/90-16 tire on the hack and I had to flip the upper shock mount to get enough clearance under the fender. That puts the sidecar high, and when we remounted it to the LS a couple weeks ago we had to use all the available adjustment in the attachment hardware and shock preload to make it sit level. I'd be tempted to use a lower profile tire next time so I can drop the sidecar a couple inches, but when I get back to Minnesota the Spyder will go back on the GS and it'll be running' the dirt roads again, where a dual sport tire will be more appropriate.

So ya, sometimes the hardware you're working with dictates what you can do, but there are workarounds...
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Old 01-29-2015, 06:45 AM   #13
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Is America, buy/build/ride what you like.
clearly people do that everywhere else too.
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Old 01-29-2015, 07:20 AM   #14
claude
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About 9 or so inches on the sidecar is usually okay in most situations. The main reason for the swaybar is to inhance handing on most surfaces as it levels out the ride.
Everything is a compromise. Rock crawler trucks and Corvettes are not one and the same. It seems like the huge ground clearance thing with sidecars took hold in this country more than others.
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Old 01-29-2015, 08:01 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by claude View Post
About 9 or so inches on the sidecar is usually okay in most situations. The main reason for the swaybar is to inhance handing on most surfaces as it levels out the ride.
Everything is a compromise. Rock crawler trucks and Corvettes are not one and the same. It seems like the huge ground clearance thing with sidecars took hold in this country more than others.




Don't you dare start bringing common sense into this.


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