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Old 05-19-2010, 08:33 PM   #31
bananaman OP
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Update: coil is fine. Sparkplug wires are fine. O2 sensor is malfunctioning, causing a too-rich mixture. Theory is that constantly feathering the throttle helped compensate.

So I'll spend $200ish on the sensor and another couple of hundred on labor... and then I might have my 110mph wheelie machine back.
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Old 05-21-2010, 08:00 PM   #32
CCjon
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O2 Sensor

Quote:
Originally Posted by bananaman
Update: coil is fine. Sparkplug wires are fine. O2 sensor is malfunctioning, So I'll spend $200ish on the sensor and another couple of hundred on labor... and then I might have my 110mph wheelie machine back.
Glad you finally tracked down the source of the power loss. Since it is in the dealers, guess they should fix it.

I thought I read somewhere here of an aftermarket O2 sensor from an automobile manufacturer that would retro-fit for less $$$? Ring a bell with anyone?
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:19 PM   #33
vintagerider
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Lambda sensor-not

I'm with m-f-flake. Sounds like a bad TPS. Had one go out and did the same thing. Did you smack the TPS in a fall over? Check the seam on the backside to see if it is cracked. Check the plug for corrosion or a bad wire.

On the fuel pressure regulator, if it sticks open on oilheads, too much fuel returns through the fuel return line to the tank causing low volume/pressure at the injectors. If it were to stick close, your injectors would be be running at 3 which is the max pump pressure and would run fine at cruising speed.

On the 1100 regulator system the only time the regulator opens is at idle or low rpm. As fuel demands increase under moderate acceleration or cruising, the regulator closes, with little fuel returning through the fuel return. It works to relieve excess fuel when there is low demand from the engine. It is really just a pressure relief valve which allows fuel which isn't being used at idle/low engine demand to flow back in to the tank. Rarely do these fail by sticking open or closed.

The r1100 can run w/o an o2 sensor, so I do not think that is the problem.

edit: "the only time the regulator closes"...corrected to read OPENS.

vintagerider screwed with this post 05-22-2010 at 08:39 PM
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Old 05-22-2010, 01:42 PM   #34
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Is the consensus that I shouldn't spend $400 on the O2 sensor?

I'm completely out of my comfort zone. So all of your advice is helpful.
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Old 05-22-2010, 03:25 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bananaman
Is the consensus that I shouldn't spend $400 on the O2 sensor?
Sir,
The GSpot FAQ says "It is a Bosch Universal Oxygen Sensor 15729 (~$65 at auto parts store)".

Please keep in mind: I am the editor, not the source, of this information.

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Old 05-22-2010, 07:09 PM   #36
bananaman OP
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Vintagerider- your PMs are awesome. If it's nit too much trouble, would you mind posting them here for everyone?

It looks like you might be saving me a few hundred dollars. I've got $75 in diagnostic labor. Since I can just pull out the O2 sensor, there's no need to spend any money, and I think this will make the bike an even more capable world traveler, right?

I'll be reading and studying the Wisdom, the IBMW.org, and my clymers, before I spend another $400!
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Old 05-22-2010, 08:58 PM   #37
vintagerider
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M-F-Flake indicated the most probable cause, a TPS issue. Smack them and the casing becomes distorted, even cracked. Mine had a crack in the rear seam allowing moisture to enter. Easy to check the output voltage -see FAQ. The tps socket and plug need to be checked for lack of corrosion- sometimes the rubber boot leaks. The ground wire from the TPS could be broken.

The other common things are:
1. the wiring harness from the orange plug under the tank to the ignition switch. Either the wiring goes bad from constant flexing or the solder joint at the switch breaks. The switch itself could be bad, but not as likely.Easy fix with new wires and posi-lock connectors (if too lazy to solder). Others frequently note that the ignition key does not need to be removed. Just remove the plastic switch body from underneath. It drops right out. Not a tricky process at all. Graft in new wires if they are original no matter what else you find.

2. bad fuel hose inside the tank or loose internal fuel clamps post filter. May reveal problems only under pressure. Check the rubber lines from the fuel pump outlet to the filter to the rubber U to the front 5/16" bulkhead fitting on the pump plate. If any submersible lines need to be replaced use only fuel injection line rated for submersion in fuel. Riders have removed the rubber U attached to the oem fuel filter and replaced it with alternate fuel line, usually not rated for fuel immersion. This can get soft in the bend and restrict fuel flow. Solution: Keep you rubber U, or. less desirable, make one up out of steel tube or brass tee with barb to MPT fittings. If you choose the latter be sure to use special locktite, permanent, high strength. Avoid the threaded fittings when another solution is available because it is hard to get them to seal well without leaking.

3. Check for vacuum leaks at the throttle body to head rubber compliance fitting (do not over tighten the clamp as it will destroy the rubber fitting). Check to see that the test ports under the TB's are properly capped, or if the charcoal canister is still installed, check that the lines to it are not rotted and leaking vacuum.

4. Check for proper throttle cable seating at TB's and for correct slack.

5. Check the pump impeller blades on the inlet , suction side. They are know to break.

6. Check air filter for proper seating on the 11xx, especially the 1100. The design of the cover is such that the battle to get it fitted on the air box can result in a crushed air filter. Other than the obvious issues of no air filtration, this situation cause very bad engine performance which became apparent for me not until I returned to lower elevation.

7. The following is not the cause of your problem but if not replacing the 02 sensor, read up on the motronic 2.2., the ECU version used on all 1100's except the 1100s.
Lentini:
http://www.ibmwr.org/r-tech/oilheads...ng-fixes.shtml

CCP (cat code plug) jumper settings here:

http://www.ukgser.com/forums/showthread.php?t=37996


More on converting to the non- U.S. pec, non cat by installing BMW CO pot and ignoring the o2 sensor:
http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...light=ccp+plug

Motronic 2.2 has built in fuel maps for non-cat, non lambda sensor (o2 sensor) bikes. An old 02 sensor can be left in place (electrically disconnected) and the proper color cat code plug installed in the main relay box under the seat. You do not have to buy new cat code plugs, just use jumpers. refer to motronic diagrams. The cat-code plug just tells the motronic which fuel map to use. Temporarily remove the CCP and the motronic will default so as not to read the o2 sensor. The engine will run over-rich. The cat will not be damaged in the near term. This is a way to rule out o2 sensor issues to some extent.

If the o2 sensor is ignored by motronic as a result of CCP jumper changes, or no CCP installed and there is a dramatic performance change (unlikely), then perhaps a new o2 sensor is in order if running the stock catalytic exhaust. Satisfactory high rpm performance in this case would rule out fuel delivery or TPS or ignition wiring problems. Replacement Bosh four wire lambda o2 sensors are available for ~$65. You can change it out yourself by using posi-lock connectors to replace the bmw oem lambda harness connector.

Usually the CCP changes are reserved for bikes which have the cat converter removed. In this case a BMW CO potentiometer designed for non-cat models should be installed (bmw p/n 13621461425) . Now the motronic will have idle mixture manually set by the CO pot and the machine will run in open loop. This would be the factory config as on factory non-cat European models. This route is the factory recommended way when there is no cat converter on the bike, and, by default, no 02. There is debate regarding damage to the converter from running too rich with long term use of beige CCP or no CCP on converter equipped bikes. Many have said that you can switch to open loop with the CO pot and be fine with the catalytic converter not plugging. Heed the warnings and have the exhaust gases analyzed if you make a permanent modification as a plugged converter could lead to engine damage. No fear for short term testing.

There are several good threads here on open loop/closed loop motronic operation. A catalytic emissions bike will run fairly well with NO cat code plug installed, not that I recommend that. The thread on the booster plug accessory has good tech links. I mention this paragraph -7- because you need to resolve the bike's performance issues with 1-5 above before wasting money on an o2 sensor. Do not forget to de-power the ecu for several minutes after changes to the original configuration. This is to erase the volatile memory in the ecu so that it can recognize the new config. On the motronic 2.2 the presence or absence of CCP's, lamba sensor, and CO pot is recognized at re-start but there is still a new leaning curve for the memory that requires riding under varied conditions before the performance is optimized for the new config. After that have an "un-official" low cost idle exhaust gas analysis performed at a smog station and follow up with spark plug readings.

vintagerider screwed with this post 05-24-2010 at 02:03 AM
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Old 05-23-2010, 10:27 AM   #38
bananaman OP
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Now that I think about it, there could be compromised fittings and hoses around the fuel filter and pump. I've been inside the tank a few times. And I chopped off the cannister. I didn't realize how critical each hose could be.
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Old 05-23-2010, 11:57 AM   #39
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Excellent synopsis there vintagerider.

And a decidedly helpful list of diagnostic steps for a variety of age related potential & manifested problems.

With yours and the OP's OK I'll add this to the HoW…

JJ
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Old 05-23-2010, 01:43 PM   #40
bananaman OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnjen
Excellent synopsis there vintagerider.

And a decidedly helpful list of diagnostic steps for a variety of age related potential & manifested problems.

With yours and the OP's OK I'll add this to the HoW…

JJ
Hey JJ- you totally have my ok.
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Old 05-23-2010, 04:35 PM   #41
bananaman OP
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What kind if high-altitude performance will I get w/o an O2 sensor, especially 10,000 feet to 16,000 feet?
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Old 05-24-2010, 12:56 AM   #42
vintagerider
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The real credit goes to riders here and abroad who have done the testing and primary research. Thanks to them, the forums and mods who make these venues possible, the R11xx series live on. Maybe donate % of what we save in parts, labor, unnecessary tow and motel bills to the sites to help keep them up. Thanks JJ, post with credit to the original sources, site owners and moderators who make riding affordable and more rewarding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnjen
Excellent synopsis there vintagerider.

And a decidedly helpful list of diagnostic steps for a variety of age related potential & manifested problems.

With yours and the OP's OK I'll add this to the HoW…

JJ
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Old 05-24-2010, 01:30 AM   #43
vintagerider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bananaman
What kind if high-altitude performance will I get w/o an O2 sensor, especially 10,000 feet to 16,000 feet?
I defer to experts on this issue, but as I understand it, the ecu is equipped with a barometric sensor to compensate for elevation. Factory non-cat, non-lambda R11xx's run fine at all elevations. The consensus seems to be that of keeping the idle CO% within factory spec and that the U.S. spec with lambda installed is not that far off from the Euro spec.
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Old 05-24-2010, 05:36 AM   #44
bananaman OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagerider
I defer to experts on this issue, but as I understand it, the ecu is equipped with a barometric sensor to compensate for elevation. Factory non-cat, non-lambda R11xx's run fine at all elevations. The consensus seems to be that of keeping the idle CO% within factory spec and that the U.S. spec with lambda installed is not that far off from the Euro spec.
thanks!
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Old 05-24-2010, 10:08 AM   #45
bananaman OP
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When Greg (GS Diablo) looked at my bike, when it was first not-running, he didn't like all the oil on the TPS. (I finally realized what the TPS actually is.)

Before my Panama/Tierra del Fuego ride, I bought a wunderlich locking oil filler cap. It locks, but it doesn't seal well. Like maybe it needs a new O ring. It wasn't much of a problem, but on the 970-miles-in-13.5-hours ride, it was leaking like mad. The whole left side of the bike is covered in oil. It's really just a little bit of oil. The sight glass never showed a significant (really, any) drop in oil volume. But my pant leg, my boot, and the whole side of the bike is covered in oil. The TPS is coated with it. I'll replace the O ring.
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