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Old 04-02-2011, 08:08 PM   #1
The Bigfella OP
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Cambodia -Vietnam by all known means of transport

I flew into Siem Reap, Cambodia in mid June 2010, the plan being to take a good look around the temples, head down the Mekong by boat, around the delta, then buy a motorbike and head north to Hanoi, Halong Bay and Sapa.

To cover the same terrain on just the one bike would have been impossible in the time – especially given the border crossing issues.

Bike hire isn’t available in Siem Reap for the main town area – there are some options for trail rides, but not for general tourism, so I organised a tuktuk for there and for Phnom Penh.



By the time the trip was over, I’d been on well over a dozen motorbikes, including the one I bought, which was a Zinda – a China Honda, as these generic clones are called in Vietnam, one I rented, three that came with a rider/guide, a couple of tuktuks, and several more that were just motorbike taxis. The Zinda did well, and I reckon I put in about 3,500 km on her and had a damn fun time doing it.



The whole Cambodia-Vietnam trip included the gamut of transport, mainly on the bike that I bought in Saigon, but also a couple of trains – including sending the bikes by train too, one plane leg to catch up with the bike, a few sections by boat, bus, and so on. My main travelling partner even worked in four days on a pushbike. Her first ever ride on a motorbike was our push out of Saigon to Vung Tau. I had my heart in my mouth following her down the road as trucks thundered past her.

What was planned as three months was cut back to 6 weeks by a client who insisted I get back by the start of August to help with some major projects. I rationalised that by thinking I’ll head back in the dry season and finish what I’d planned to do then… and it being dry will make it more achievable. That is to ride a bike down the Ho Chi Minh Trail… and that trip plan is now well advanced.

Here's a couple of teaser pics from later in the trip...







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Old 04-02-2011, 08:48 PM   #2
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Day 1 was relatively slow – a tour of the war museum – where I scored my first dozen mozzie bites within 90 minutes of landing in the malaria zone. Don’t believe the guide books about mozzies only being out at dusk and dawn – they’re in the long grass too – and I was in shorts. The museum is pretty basic – an old Russian Mi-8 chopper and a Chinese built Mig fighter – plenty of rusting tanks, and artillery pieces – a T-54, a Katyushka and Organ-grinder (last two being Russian rocket-launching trucks dating back to WW2). Plenty of small arms, mortars, machine guns – all of which you can pick up and take a look at. A major land mine display too – which I thought was more effective than the specialist Landmine Museum that I saw on my last day in Siem Reap.



My guide at the war museum was a veteran – who says his friends call him the cat – because he has 9 lives. He’s been shot 3 times – shoulder, leg and groin, the last one resulting in his heart stopping twice. Land-mined on 5 occasions, one of which took his lower leg, another took an eye. He’s a walking shrapnel bag too – with visible chunks of metal under his skin. His wife was taken by a land mine in 2007 – she bled out in 20 minutes, yet there was no display of bitterness from him. He’s an impressive chap. I was the only westerner that I saw there.

The afternoon was spent in the traditional Aussie way – getting Mr Jeat pissed. The mission was certainly accomplished by 11pm…. having toured a few of the local establishments and we watched some World Cup with some very enthusiastic guys. Local places – not tourist spots. He cottoned on to that and enjoyed it. In the traditional Khmer way, he was a bit reluctant at first, wanting me to steer towards where he knew tourists like to congregate. I just reminded him that I didn’t want to see any other tourists when we went to a restaurant or bar and he, in the Khmer way obliged. I’ve struck the same reluctance later on, in Phnom Penh, with Mr Mao – who was introduced via Jeat (they point tourists to each other – and it’s a damn good thing). Mr Mao was a bit harder to convince. It took some repeated prodding to get to local facilities, rather than the tourist traps…. and to convince him we didn’t want to feed the pigeons near the river.

Day 2 was another lazy day – and I needed it after the frantic departure prep.

An intensive job (ie every waking hour, many pre-dawn starts and very late finishes) had come in a couple of weeks before departure – and had been finished only a couple of days before I flew out. I couldn’t even get down to check on my boat on the mooring to make sure she was OK and I ended up making two trips there the day I flew out. The solar panel regulator had crapped itself – the batteries were flat and one of the two bilge pumps wasn’t working. I got another battery from home and a new regulator (thanks to my wife for driving half way across town to get it) – and had to double the new battery onto an old one because of terminal issues, installed the regulator, crossed my fingers and headed to the airport. To quote my wife, “the boat is a pain in the arse”….

It wasn’t quite that quiet with us…. but because of the Bangkok situation – with the riots ultimately resulting in 91 deaths - things were very quiet in the tourist trade in Siem Reap.

I’d spoken to a number of friends about coming on this trip. One, Kylie – who used to work with me about 5 ½ years ago – and did parts of this trip then (she did the Cambodian bit and also went into southern Laos on a pushbike) said that she’d love to go back. She was back in Oz, showing her Scottish boyfriend the highlights of the place and we had a chat and thought we could stand each other long enough to travel together.

Kylie pulled out before I left Oz because of her flatmate Jane’s health issues (advanced breast cancer), then at the last minute ….. found she couldn’t get back to Edinburgh in time to see Jane who had gone into renal failure – and then she arrived in Siem Reap on Day 2–after I’d already cancelled her booking.

We were lucky enough, after Kylie’s arrival to score a twin at the hotel, so I managed to get down from the lofty fourth floor to the second. A welcome move for my weary knees. Another afternoon and evening was spent acquainting ourselves with the Angkor beer motto – My Country My Beer. More Khmer food cooked for Khmers. Kylie was aghast though to discover that that Siem Reap now has a KFC – and she just about blew a fuse later on when she spotted both KFC and Gloria Jeans in Phnom Penh. Things they are a changing.

One thing that hasn't changed... is the way they ride their bikes.

I loved Dad, letting the kid steer...



I won't dwell too much on Siem Reap, given we were on tuktuks at this stage, rather than our own bikes, other than to say, it stole our hearts. The tourist hot-spots are the temples, and we used a three day pass to good effect



This is our driver, Jeat, and friend. I do believe this is the woman he married just after we left...



We spent a fair bit of time with Jeat... and he took us out to meet his family and friends. This was particularly interesting....



Jeat took us out to one of the local villages - with our take-away Khmer lunch, then went off and got a carton of beer (his shout).. and some fried crickets. I'll say a bit more about that later... sorry... gotta go - kids soccer....



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Old 04-03-2011, 02:15 AM   #3
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: Day 3, we started our 3 day pass to the temples of Siem Reap and surrounding areas. Its US$40 for the pass, which is a photo ID card. We arrived with our card at the first stop – the biggie, Angkor Wat – the largest religious monument in the world, and stopped for brekkie at the cafes.

Walking in, we were met by the usual phalanx of street urchins, most here pushing to sell drinks, postcards and knick knacks. One young girl – maybe 12-14 grabbed me by my shirt-sleeve and said “hey mister, you are losing your money” – yep, there was about US$50 in notes almost ready to bite the dust. That’s a lot of money over there. Most places in the world, the urchins would watch, wait for it to fall (or grab it first) and be off. Not in Cambodia. I had a similar thing in Phnom Penh – but at least I’ve learnt to keep only small change in the pocket – a couple of bucks worth – the rest goes in what my daughter calls my “granny purse” – a Packsafe neck pouch.


Interesting thing that neck pouch – the bloody thing isn’t waterproof. There’s a great bit of design eh? Sell someone a pouch which destroys your passport and 3 day pass when it gets soaked through with sweat. The passport is now in a plastic bag in the neck pouch – but it certainly won’t be making another overseas trip with me. I had “issues” at the CambodiaVietnam border…. because my passport photo is now really half a passport photo, with all the ink in the other half having run. The big lock on my Packsafe net crapped itself too.

Now – Ankor Wat. Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant. Should one say “must see”? Yep. The rise and fall of civilisations is a fascinating thing and IIRC, the area around Angkor Wat was supporting one million people back when London was a town of 50,000. It like all great civilisations rose, dominated and ultimately fell. The stonework that remains is phenomenal.




That’s the new way up to the top of Angkor Wat – and yeah, that's me - they’ve upped the safety a bit now and protected the stonework by adding this staircase – although some of the other temples are still very hard to climb, without any of this – and a couple of tourists fell to their death last year on an outlying temple (in the rain)


The heat and humidity at this time of the year was an issue (the sweaty passport) and for some unknown reason both my Nikon DSLR and my Canon point and shoot batteries died on me while I was at the top of Angkor Wat (65 metres up the steepest ever staircase)…. so I’ve had to bludge Kyles’ photos for the rest of that day. We also did some other temples that day – all chugging along behind the ever-reliable Mr Jeat in his tuktuk. When I let Jeat wear my helmet with the video camera on it, his smile just about met at the back of his head.


The main Temples we did (and there were others that we also explored) over the three days were Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom (smaller, steeper, more decayed), Terrace of the Elephants, Ta Prohm (the one filmed in Tomb-raider) – it is Jeat’s favourite, Banteay Srei and several others. Here’s some random shots:

The temples are the drawcard – the people are the winner. They really won our hearts.






Yeah - interesting place that... Jeat's favourite Karaoke place. I have my suspicions, because apparently some of the women there think they love me... and I was travelling with a woman btw....





Jeat (www.angkorwattuktuk.com) took us home to meet Mum and his youngest sister and we ate there with them. The funniest thing was watching Kylie, a vegetarian contemplating a plate of pork with Jeat’s mum watching on. I helped her out....
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Old 04-03-2011, 06:33 PM   #4
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If an establishment has to remind you No guns No grenades No knives, then you know you're in the right place

Great pics!
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Old 04-04-2011, 12:07 AM   #5
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If an establishment has to remind you No guns No grenades No knives, then you know you're in the right place

Great pics!
Well, the brief to him was to take us where we wouldn't see other Westerners where possible.... and he got pretty good at that.

We were at one of his favourite bars one night, no westerners other than us, and I went for a slash …. as one does, walked into the Men’s – and there’s two blokes – locals – one having a pee, the other massaging his back. I’m a broad-minded old bastard, so I just nodded and went about my business…. which wasn’t easy. The stalls all had a 2′ deep, head high brick wall between them…. but I couldn’t get my shoulders between the two walls – not a hope in hell, let alone get a bit of elbow room. So – I’m taking aim from 2′ away… when, I get a bit of mano on mano action.

Yep – there’s a pair of hands on my shoulders, back and butt giving me a massage. I’m not the slightest bit homophobic…. don't care if its a bloke or a woman fixing my back on the massage table, but that was a newie on me. Trying to pee while a bloke’s going at my back.... All clean and above board, of course…. a money making venture though….. and it cost me a buck to have a pee. Only in Asia.

I'll drop in a few more Cambodian photos later.... but on our last day in Siem Reap, we did a trip out to the floating village on Lake Tonle Sap. The Lake is fresh water, and it dominates Cambodian life... its a major source of food and is something like 25 more productive of seafood than the North Sea... I've seen it described as the most productive fishing ground in the world. Its about to be stuffed, of course... by the massive number of dams being constructed all the way along the Mekong and its tributaries (we'll see one being built when we get to the Vietnam highlands.... we had to duck falling rocks on our way past).

The floating village is great.





Its got the normal compliment of urchins trying to earn a buck... and yeah, I held her snake and paid a buck...







I detected a bit of, well I hesitate to call it racism, lets just say dislike, between the Cambodians and some of these tourist chasers out there. The chasers were pretty much all Vietnamese, and the Cambodians didn't want to know them. The kid with the snake's mother ended up getting dunked as we left the village - the chaser's boats are all flocking around trying to flog you something.... and our driver just gassed it.... and mum went in with the wash. Our driver just kept going, but the others in the small boats dragged her out OK. The look on her face as she went over the side was priceless... but I missed the shot.

We were out there when a storm rolled across the lake and Kylie was upstairs taking photos and video of the storm, but I decided I'd buy the lads a beer. We'd taken Jeat out with us and there were two crew for our boat - we were the only passengers.



That's just one of a series I shot for a panorama... must get around to putting it together some day!

I bought our crew a beer each and told them we may as well sit out the storm. All the other blokes from other boats were peering over our shoulders and no doubt cursing their luck to have stingy tourists on their boat (they said as much later). I slipped Jeat $20 and said "I bet you can buy beer here cheaper than me... how about another dozen." Sure enough... I'd paid $1.20 each for the 5 I'd bought. He got a dozen for $10.... less than 85 cents each. I handed them out (and ended up getting another dozen....)... and the boat guys went and got a bowl of cooked prawns. They ran out, so they went and got "a local delicacy" - a bowl of raw prawns and some dipping sauce.

We lads had a wild old time until the weather abated... and the miserable old French, Italian and other assorted tourists sat well away and looked down their noses at us. Their loss, not ours. Apparently, this has been known to happen with other Aussies over there too.



Oh yeah... I got to drive the boat back across the Lake. The throttle was a bit of wire attached to a rib - you just stretched it a bit with your foot....



This was the run back up the Tonle Sap River. It was pretty much as low as it gets before the monsoons hit. When they do, the flow of the river reverses as the Lake gets flushed out from the backflow of the Mekong at the bottom end. The Lake expands massively in size too.







Its a tough old life



Here's a couple of new boats being built on the river bank



To make sure I get some bike content into this (hey... its coming... another week and we buy the bikes, OK?)... here's 3 generations we passed on the way back into town




The plastic bag thingy here is a cricket trap – they put a light at the top to attract the crickets at night – they hit the vertical sheet of plastic and fall into the water. They collect them in the morning and fry them up. They are a bit crunchy but surprisingly nice tasting – a bit nutty even. Thorough mastication is recommended….. to avoid wing and leg fragments

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Old 04-04-2011, 02:36 AM   #6
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I love Cambodia!
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Old 04-04-2011, 03:15 AM   #7
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Nice report! Great Pictures! Thanks for sharing!
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Old 04-04-2011, 05:54 AM   #8
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Gotta get back there
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Old 04-05-2011, 07:22 AM   #9
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OK, I've processed some more photos... won't scare you by telling you how many, but here's some more from the first week...

Let's kick it off with one that I found a bit disturbing. This woman was trying to make a living collecting rubbish... with her sick kids with her. It isn't easy for everyone...



Another that's typical of how "we" treated the world we conquered.



The missing heads from a lot of the statues here disappeared to gardens in France, during the colonial period.

Still plenty to see though...







I found a better shot of those raw prawns the guys shouted me



Can't say I ever expected to eat, and enjoy, something like that.

Speaking of eating and enjoying.... I'd taken Jeat to one of the top restaurants for locals in town before Kylie arrived... and we went back one night with Kylie. A friend of Jeat's joined us for a while, but all up for drinks for 4, meals for 3, the bill came to about $16.75. We'd had fabulous service from a young waitress, and when the bill came, I slipped the change from a $20 on the outside of the bill folder. Put it inside, so I'm told, and it goes to the establishment. Leave it on the outside, to the staff member. I've never seen a happier waitress in my life - she skipped back into the kitchen and showed the others - we could see her jumping up and down in glee. I take it the locals don't tip much.

I mentioned the throttle on the tourist boat, a post or two back. Here it is... not bad eh?



Its funny seeing a society with finery like this



then wandering out of there and seeing this...



At least they have very helpful signs at the better tourist attractions, so that we tourists do the right thing



Anyhow, our time in Siem Reap over, we let someone talk us into going to Phnom Penh by bus, rather than trying to find a boat down via the Lake. The locals seem to think that if it isn't airconditioned, we won't like it... but, the water levels were low, so maybe they knew best? I had a lovely lady sitting next to me, who got off at a stop and bought a big bag of fried crickets to share with me.



Kylie got shoved somewhere down the back. I had a front row seat, wondering if that windscreen was going to finally give out and end up in my lap



As usual, we got a room up flight after bloody flight of stairs in Phnom Penh. Nice bling eh?



Some more of the local cuisine. Not bad either...



Better than the look of the local butcher's shop



We only hung around Phnom Penh for a couple of days. The Killing Fields stuff is really draining. Here's the path we were walking on...



Yep - human bones, every bloody where... bits of clothing poking out of the ground. Its a must-see, as is the S-21 Museum, but sheesh.

At least we were staying at a high class hotel...



You have to love the casual nature of things in Cambodia, eh?



I probably got closer to this tourist monkey in the park than I should have, but he was less objectionable to some of the other things we saw.



I had a bit of a lad's tour of the sights and took in a couple of World Cup football games at some local's bars - having found the tourist bars I'd been shown a tad seedy. Kylie hadn't come out for a look and when I got back, I discovered that Kylie's flatmate back in Scotland had died. Jane was another Aussie, lost to breast cancer at 31. A very sad time.

This is Mao, a lovely, quiet chap, who'd been recommended to us by Jeat. Check out his fuel tank... a plastic bottle.



He actually slept outside our hotel in his tuktuk so that he'd be there if we got up early. Kylie ended up giving him some clothing for his wife, to lighten her pack a bit. Mao paid a monk to bless us for the rest of our trip just before we left Phnom Penh on the boat to Vietnam.



I'll leave the boat trip for the next post... but we had some fun and games trying to organise a few days on the river, rather than just the one day trip. One guy quoted us $2,500 for 3 days. Yeah, sure mate. We just stood up and walked out.
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Old 04-05-2011, 07:46 AM   #10
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Man, I know that place well. I sat right there my last morning in Phnom Penh just a month ago. Not so crazy about the touristy stuff right in that neighborhood, but Cambodia on the whole was outstanding. I was so sad to leave.
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Old 04-06-2011, 02:06 AM   #11
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Here's a few of the bikes in Phnom Penh







My sort of bike



And one last one of the S-21 museum



We had a couple of drinks at another touristy bar (Mao was harder to convince that we wanted to "go local" than Jeat had been)... and Kylie really hit it off with the waitresses. She bought them a drink, but the bloody owner snaffled in on the action... so we buggered off.
Here's the girls




We only stayed the one night in the Phnom Penh cesspit (I was happy with that, given Kylie needed a move to cheer up a bit)

What with the Mekong River right beside the ticket office where we bought our "slow boat" ticket for the trip down river to Vietnam, you'd reckon it'd just be a wander down to the dock and away you'd go eh?

Nah... cram into a minibus and off through the traffic instead... for quite a ways. Things went to crap a bit when we got a flat tyre... and had no wheel brace to change the wheel. Check out the passing traffic...





We were late after that half hour delay and the driver went beserk, trying to make up time. We eventually got to the boat...



... and headed off down the mighty Mekong, which is a fascinating river. There's always something happening. It kept me amused in the rain..



Old Plimsol would have a heart attack.... there's so many boats here with decks awash it isn't funny.



Life got a bit more interesting around lunchtime, when I spied a fellow passenger with a jar of Vegemite. I asked her if she was Australian... no, Italian... so there was a bit of Rossi / Stoner banter and we got chatting.



We ended up staying at the same floating hotel in Chau Doc after crossing into Vietnam and let our hair down a bit over dinner



Michele, wasn't looking too happy, as his native Italia were losing a World Cup match... but Kylie, Eliza and I didn't mind.

Kylie, as usual, was up to mischief, and insisted on being the motive power for the cyclo ride back to the hotel



This was the scene out the floating hotel window in the morning. As usual in Vietnam, the women were doing the heavy lifting while the blokes had a bludge.



She's got about 4 dozen bricks on her back for that trip up the gangplank.

At the post office, I ended up in my usual "take photo with me" role... later in the trip, in Hanoi, I had my photo taken by locals a dozen times in the one day... including with some rather scared kids.



The four of us moved to a cheaper hotel the next day - here's the wiring in the shower...



... and started looking for a boat we could head down-river on. We wanted a local ferry, or something like that. It turns out they don't exist. We got offered a ride in these... for $90 for the 65 miles down to Can Tho



We passed on that. Michele was feeling crook, 39C temp, so he stayed in bed while the rest of us tried to find a better boat. In the end, we left it to Eliza and Kylie and I signed up for a short trip up to the top of the local mountain – 6km away to be followed by a visit to the local forest sanctuary – supposedly excellent bird photography. Short trip – didn’t even bother with the kidney belt (that was a HUGE mistake).

Left at 1 pm – got back at 7:30pm - in the dark with no headlight to speak of. About 90 minutes was spent at locations – rest of the time, I was on the back of either a 100cc scooter, or the brother’s 110cc scooter. I had a backpack on as well with cameras, lens and water. By the time we got to the last stop… I couldn’t get off the bike – the leg angle of the seating was acute, so my legs locked – and every bump, the suspension bottomed – and the shock went straight up my spine.

This sort of thing was everywhere... drying food on the road.



My arms were nearly dropping off from trying to lift myself off the seat at every bump…. should have video of us nearly taking out a dog – and me karate chopping the rider on both arms – we were travelling about 6m (20') behind a truck and the rider was perving at some cute chick beside the road – and the truck stopped. I chopped both his upper arms and screamed at him – we missed the truck by about 300mm – and if I hadn’t alerted him – I wouldn’t be writing this.... we'd have been under the truck at 50kph.

The last hour of the trip was spent flat out (given the roads) doing a 50 km leg back from a place called the $2 million mountain (Tuc Duc Hill) – although I had to get them to stop twice for a leg/back stretch – or I’d have fallen off the back. My rider kindly assisted with a back and bottom massage both times….. and to digress, that’s the second man-on-man action I’ve scored so far this trip. This man's not for turning though lads.

Back to the $2 million mountain – so named because of the cost, from what I can gather, of all the bombs the Americans used during the American War (of Agression)... their words – to try and kill the soldiers living in the caves. It took the best part of an hour to get through the caves – got some good photos down there, but I'll limit them here.

Here's the Hill... pretty innocuous looking, but made up of huge boulders. We ended up quite a long way down below this level...



Bit darker than this down there... plenty of bats, etc...



Happy to finally get back to the surface



Other stops were a couple of pagodas – including the Lady Temple and a village where the Khmer Rouge massacred a Vietnamese village in the temple in 1978 – still plenty of evidence – including all the skulls in another display case and signs of damage from grenades in the temple. I thought we'd seen the last of this sort of thing when we left Phnom Penh....



Ended up going out to dinner that night with an extra... a lady from the Czech Republic who's into bikes too.



Stopped at Mr Kamikazee’s grandparent’s place for a rest too – and met his young kids – Grandad still had one very obvious tooth – but that was about it.... a soup-eater for sure.
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Old 04-06-2011, 04:56 PM   #12
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Keep em coming mate
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Old 04-07-2011, 04:32 AM   #13
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Eliza struck gold while Kylie and I were out riding around on the back of the guides' bikes. She found a little shop near the markets and the husband of the woman who ran the shop organised tours. At last she could speak to someone who understood what we were trying to achieve. We didn't want a fast tourist boat.... we wanted to travel down river with some locals.


He shot off down to the river and organised it.... a trip from Chau Doc (near the Cambodian border) 65 miles down the Mekong River to Can Tho with a local family on their cargo boat.


We weren’t assured of the trip unless and until they sold the load of bananas they had brought up from the delta to Chau Doc. It all came together though and we had a delightful 10 hour cruise with the most wonderful group of people. They had never carried tourists before. It was a real highlight of our trip so far. They didn't speak a single word of English and didn't much know what was expected of them... but we worked it out.



Heading out to meet our boat



Here's the boat. Cute eh? There was mum, her eldest daughter (heavily pregnant) and her hubby, son and two daughters.



This is the eldest son, who drove the whole way sitting on an old chair in the wheelhouse...






The two youngest girls were real sweeties, particularly the youngest who was a real bubbly kid. She really took to Kylie.



The family spread out some bamboo mats for us in the cargo area and then left us alone. They started playing some bingo game, so I went over and started to interact a bit. It didn't take long and we had the phrase book out and a slow conversation started.



Passing river traffic.







In behind that dish on the blue door is the head - the toilet. It was just a hole in the floorboards. I went out back for a pee, and mum sent the youngest daughter out to make sure I didn't fall overboard (yeah, sure... I've got about 8 boats of my own thanks... including one about this size)... so that put paid to peeing over the side. It was into that damn midget-sized head - and it was all I could do to shut the door. It was the smallest space I've ever been in. I couldn't stand up, I couldn't move. I most certainly couldn't have taken a crap in there... and it was all I could do to manoeuver things enough to take a pee shot at the hole. I could hear nails on the tin sheeting popping... but I succeeded in the end.


Meanwhile... the scenery changed every few minutes. Here's a brick factory... which I believe is fired by stacking the clay and interlacing it with coal brickettes, then igniting it. Not exactly EPA certified.



More traffic...







Yeah... I've got hundreds more... but hang in, next post I promise to buy the bikes....

That really was a highlight of our trip. They were lovely people. The guy who set it up was keen to hear if it worked for us... so we sent him some photos so he could do it again a bit easier.


In the meantime... I don't think I posted this one from Cambodia, did I? An obliging Japanese tourist

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Old 04-07-2011, 05:02 AM   #14
Jacl-Kampuchea
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Looks like a great trip.

FYI: The plastic bottle on Mao's Tuk-Tuk actually holds water and when he is driving he turns a little tap so that it drips over the engine and cools it - as those engines where never supposed to take large loads like trailers.

A case of 24 Angkor is $10.50, but you cannot blame them for profiting from tourists. I know they are even more crazy for the tourist Dong in Vietland too.

The place where you saw the bones from the KR period used be cambodian territory & most of the people there are park of the Khmer Krom ethnic minority and get persecuted because of this by both Viet's and Khmers.

Good travelogue.

P.S: I don't share your opinion of Phnom Penh. If you come back I will get you a beer and try and change your mind.
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Old 04-07-2011, 05:17 AM   #15
SR1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacl-Kampuchea View Post
Looks like a great trip.

FYI: The plastic bottle on Mao's Tuk-Tuk actually holds water and when he is driving he turns a little tap so that it drips over the engine and cools it - as those engines where never supposed to take large loads like trailers.

That's right, water cooled / air cooled, the easy way.

Jacl, I'll catch up with you in PP anytime.
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