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Old 06-20-2010, 07:51 PM   #31
dave6253 OP
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61 miles to Toroweap



A little evidence of yesterdays rain appear in many spots.


They've been busy adding sections of coarse gravel in many of the sections that were susceptable to mud and bull dust.




Most of this road is very easy and high speed. 70+ mph is possible at times.




My first attempt at the "Ghost Rider" shot.




I stop to smell the flowers.





This pronghorn doe was scared away from the road when I passed. She then crossed behind me and started grazing not far from where I stopped to get this photo.


Mount Trumbull - Last year I rode closer to this mountain because I came in from Mesquite, Nevada on Elbow Canyon Road.


The slickest mud hole.


Last year this was a long and deep section of silt. You can still see the detour to the right. They've repaired this section with crushed rock. That took the challenge right out of this ride.




You are close to Toroweap when you find the old Road Grader.


Adams Leaning Wheel Grader


Gears


I see SIX Leaning Wheels.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:10 PM   #32
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Eek Toroweap - My Home for the Night

This was the only silt bed not repaired yet. It was pretty compacted due to the recent rain, so it was not a problem.








In 61 miles I saw one person. He was in a pickup heading the opposite direction.


It was a short ride today, but I'm home for the night.


It's about 1 PM when I find the camp site and prepare lunch.


The view from my picnic table.


There was only one other camp site occupied. I never spoke with the occupants and camped on the far end of the campground from them. It's Sunday night.


I spread out all my wet gear to dry.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:14 PM   #33
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Dave, thank you! Your photos are stunning! I must have your fortune cookie!
You had everything thrown at you - snow, ice, rain, mud, dead battery, all ingredients for a great adventure. There is something really special about riding solo and you captured it perfectly. It makes me want to get on my bike and never look back!
Cheers.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:31 PM   #34
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Way Too Many Photos of Toroweap



I walk the 3/4 mile down to the actual view point. You can ride there, but I needed the exercise. No you can't camp at the point anymore.


You can bypass this post if you are afraid of scenic overload, or heights.


I go to work.




While waiting for the clouds to clear I used my wife's Amazon Kindle to read a book.


I kept hearing the sounds of motors. I thought they were airplanes, but never saw them. Finally I looked closer and realized I wasn't alone. 3000 feet below the river was busy with motorized rafts.


This shot was with a 300mm ZOOM.


300mm ZOOM!




Those two boats are on the beach in this photo. Can you see them?


I didn't think so.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:52 PM   #35
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The photos are so vivid!! --so blue, so orange!!! Amazing canyon and flower shots. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:06 PM   #36
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The BLUE text are facts I gleaned from Wikipedia. Of course, one could argue there are no facts there.

The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, ranges in width from 4 to 18 miles (6.4 to 29 km) and attains a depth of over a mile (1.83 km) (6000 feet).

I place myself in the photo for a sense of SCALE. Those two boats and the people with them are on the beach in this photo as well. Toroweap is unique because the canyon is narrow, with steep walls, and is still 3000 feet deep here. Notice the crack under the slab of rock I'm standing on?



Grand Canyon National Park is one of the world’s premier natural attractions, attracting about five million visitors per year. Overall, 83% were from the United States: California (12.2%), Arizona (8.9%), Texas (4.8%), Florida (3.4%) and New York (3.2%) represented the top domestic visitors. Seventeen percent of visitors were from outside the United States; the most prominently represented nations were the United Kingdom (3.8%), Canada (3.5%), Japan (2.1%), Germany (1.9%) and The Netherlands (1.2%).



The canyon can be seen from the Toroweap (or Tuweep) Overlook situated 3000 vertical feet above the Colorado River, about 50 miles downriver from the South Rim and 70 upriver from the Grand Canyon Skywalk. This region — “one of the most remote in the United States” according to the National Park Service — is reached only by one of three lengthy dirt tracks beginning in from St. George, Utah, Colorado City or near Pipe Spring National Monument (both in Arizona). Each road traverses wild, uninhabited land for 97, 62 and 64 miles respectively. The Park Service manages the area for primitive value with minimal improvements and services.



About 600 deaths have occurred in the Grand Canyon since the 1870s. Some of these deaths occurred as the result of overly zealous photographic endeavors, some were the result of airplane collisions within the canyon, and some visitors drowned in the Colorado River. Many hikers overestimate their fitness level, become dehydrated and confused, and must be rescued. The Park Service now posts a picture of an attractive and fit young man at several trailheads with the caption "Every year we rescue hundreds of people from the Canyon. Most of them look like him", in an attempt to discourage hikers from feats which are beyond their abilities.
Of the fatalities, 53 have resulted from falls; 65 deaths were attributable to environmental causes, including heat stroke, cardiac arrest, dehydration, and hypothermia; 7 were caught in flash floods; 79 were drowned in the Colorado River; 242 perished in airplane and helicopter crashes (128 of them in the 1956 disaster); 25 died in freak errors and accidents, including lightning strikes and rock falls; 48 committed suicide; and 23 were the victims of homicides

Last year I saw a sign near Toroweap that stated a common cause of fatalities for males at the Grand Canyon was "Urinating from High Places". Don't worry. I was careful... and sober.


After a couple hours I return to camp for dinner.


Spanish explorers

In September 1540, under orders from the conquistadorFrancisco Vázquez de Coronado to search for the fabled Seven Cities of Cibola, Captain Garcia Lopez de Cardenas, along with Hopi guides and a small group of Spanish soldiers, traveled to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon between Desert View and Moran Point. Pablo de Melgrossa, Juan Galeras, and a third soldier descended some one third of the way into the Canyon until they were forced to return because of lack of water. In their report, they noted that some of the rocks in the Canyon were "bigger than the great tower of Seville." It is speculated that their Hopi guides must have been reluctant to lead them to the river, since they must have known routes to the canyon floor. Afterwards, no Europeans visited the Canyon for over two hundred years.
Fathers Francisco Atanasio Domínguez and Silvestre Vélez de Escalante were two Spanish Priests who, with a group of Spanish soldiers, explored southern Utah and traveled along the North Rim of the Canyon in Glen and Marble Canyons in search of a route from Santa Fe to California in 1776. They eventually found a crossing that today lies under Lake Powell.
Also in 1776, Fray Francisco Garces, a Franciscan missionary, spent a week near Havasupai, unsuccessfully attempting to convert a band of Native Americans. He described the Canyon as "profound".



American exploration
James Ohio Pattie, along with a group of American trappers and mountain men, was probably the next European to reach the Canyon in 1826, although there is little documentation to support this.
Jacob Hamblin (a Mormon missionary) was sent by Brigham Young in the 1850s to locate easy river crossing sites in the Canyon. Building good relations with local Native Americans and white settlers, he discovered Hope Dog in 1858 and Pierce Ferry (later operated by, and named for, Harrison Pierce) - the only two sites suitable for ferry operation. He also acted as an advisor to John Wesley Powell before his second expedition to the Grand Canyon, acting as a diplomat between Powell and the local native tribes to ensure the safety of his party.
In 1857 Edward Fitzgerald Beale superintendent of an expedition to survey a wagon road along the 35th parallel from Fort Defiance to the Colorado river led a small party of men in search of water on the Coconino plateau on the south rim of the Grand Canyon. On September 19 near present day National Canyon they came upon what May Humphreys Stacey described in his journal as "...a wonderful canyon four thousand feet deep. Everyone (in the party) admitted that he never before saw anything to match or equal this astonishing natural curiosity."
Also in 1857, the U.S. War Department asked Lieutenant Joseph Ives to lead an expedition to assess the feasibility of an up-river navigation from the Gulf of California. Also in a stern wheeler steamboat "Explorer", after two months and 350 miles (560 km) of difficult navigation, his party reached Black Canyon some two months after George Johnson. The "Explorer" struck a rock and was abandoned. Ives led his party east into the Canyon — they may have been the first Europeans to travel the Diamond Creek drainage and traveled eastwards along the South Rim. In his “Colorado River of the West” report to the Senate in 1861 he states that “One or two trappers profess to have seen the canon.”

Noon rest in Marble Canyon, second Powell Expedition, 1872


According to the San Francisco Herald, in a series of articles ran in 1853, they give this honor to Captain Joseph R. Walker who in January 1851 with his nephew James T. Walker and six men traveled up the Colorado River to a point where it joined the Virgin River and continued east into Arizona traveling along the Grand Canyon making short exploratory side trips along the way.
Walker said that he wanted to visit the Moqui Indians, as the Hopi were then called by whites. He had met these people briefly in previous years, thought them exceptionally interesting and wanted to become better acquainted. The Herald reporter took it from there, writing: “We believe that Capt. Joe Walker is the only white man in this country that has ever visited this strange people.”
In 1858, John Strong Newberry became probably the first geologist to visit the Grand Canyon.
In 1869, Major John Wesley Powell led the first expedition down the Grand Canyon.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:09 PM   #37
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How did you manage the camera while driving?
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:14 PM   #38
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Dave6253;

What filter are you using in most of these shots?. I'm presuming you've got a polarizing filter on at all times, but I felt the need to ask.....
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:25 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtdiver
How did you manage the camera while driving?
I keep the point-n-shoot camera in a pocket on the tank bag (or a jacket pocket when no tank bag is mounted). It's attached to the tank bag (or jacket) with a Gearkeeper brand retractable lanyard so that I can drop the camera if needed (I have several times). You can purchase these in truck stops. Truckers use them for their CB Radio Mikes. The small one works great. I shoot left handed and have practiced turning the camera on and off and finding interesting angles. I can easily do this with gloves on. The most important thing is to keep your attention on the road. I point the camera in any general direction at any speed and hope for the best. The Panasonic Lumix works great in "Intelligent Auto" mode. Don't worry too much about zoom or exact composition. You can crop the photos later. I've been considering attempting right-handed shots since I'm getting bored with the same angles on the left.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:33 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by California
Dave6253;

What filter are you using in most of these shots?. I'm presuming you've got a polarizing filter on at all times, but I felt the need to ask.....
California,

I actually have a nice Hoya HD circular polarizer for my 16-50mm lens, but I didn't use it in any of the photos so far in this RR. It tends to make unevenly darkened skies at wide angles greater than about 28mm. There are no filters on the PnS, of course.

The effect you see is probably from post-production in Lightroom. I'm using the Graduated Nuetral Density Filter tool to adjust exposure on the skies (or sometimes to the ground), which brings out the details in the clouds.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:36 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RideDualSport.com
There is something really special about riding solo and you captured it perfectly.
Thanks for the nice compliment. I'm glad someone understands the magic of riding solo.
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Old 06-20-2010, 09:37 PM   #42
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I've wanted to go to these same places for a very long time, but I have still not made it. Your photos have put that wish back at the forefront for my future planning. Beautiful photo work. Thanks.
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Old 06-20-2010, 10:39 PM   #43
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Kristi,

I think we would all like to see the Grand Canyon done gypsyrr style. I loved your last report about getting locked up inside a mental institution.
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Old 06-20-2010, 10:50 PM   #44
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Just More Toroweap

Camping Information


I walk back down to the canyon...




In time to watch the sunset...


And capture the last light.




Back at the campsite I notice the sliver of moon about to disappear.


Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star


How I Wonder What You Are


Star Trails - A technique I need to work on.
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:26 PM   #45
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Great report Dave... I recognize many of those roads... you represent them well!!
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