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Old 02-01-2011, 11:24 AM   #796
frankt
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Originally Posted by Deadly99 View Post
Sacrilege Dissing Tim's....how very unCanadian of you

Too bad you didn't join us, it was a good few days for sure.

Budget, tires, forgot my wallet at home...and well after the three days I just didn't feel like heading solo up into the northern parts of Ontario. I felt it would have been pushing my luck and I have obligations back home later in the week, so the "well sweety I'm stuck up here for a few days" phone call would not have been appreciated Maybe in a couple of weeks I'll head out for another rip up there and finish that section...interested?
The crappy coffee is at dunkin donuts,not at timmy's.
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Old 02-02-2011, 12:50 PM   #797
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Hy guys,
There's a foot of snow outside and I'm dreamin away.
I'm heading east this summer via the TCAT, then to the rock, NS, NB, PEI, Gaspe and then back home(Ottawa).
For some reason, I would have thought the trail to start in Quebec city, go east from there then north to hit all of the eastern provinces, then up to Labrador and west from there.
Comming from the US, it would seem a logical route to take.

Just my $.02

Denis
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Old 02-02-2011, 02:46 PM   #798
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Hy guys,
There's a foot of snow outside and I'm dreamin away.
I'm heading east this summer via the TCAT, then to the rock, NS, NB, PEI, Gaspe and then back home(Ottawa).
For some reason, I would have thought the trail to start in Quebec city, go east from there then north to hit all of the eastern provinces, then up to Labrador and west from there.
Comming from the US, it would seem a logical route to take.

Just my $.02

Denis
This has been beaten to death already...it's a cross country route, not a see every place in Canada route

That being said we are working on another route.....True North East.

Starting at the Maine/New Brunswick border and ending at the furthest northern point that roads go. It will cross the TCAT in Quebec and travel through some pretty cool places (Gaspe, Rue Du Nord, James Bay, Trans Taiga, etc). Up until now this has been kept under wraps and is now about 3/4 quarters complete. The TNE will start where a "little" project some folks down south are working on ends off (US/Canada border) and will link the TCAT to the TAT amd points south......

What about a True North West, starting where the CDR leaves off and ending at the end of the Dempster, crossing the TCAT along the way........

Fall of 2012, all three should be ready to distribute. A series of routes in North America that are all interconnected.

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Old 02-02-2011, 05:13 PM   #799
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I'm ready for that
Do I need to wait till 2012 or will you have something together to do it this summer.
I don't mind being the guinea pig.
I have a month off starting second week of July.
I won't be in a rush to get home.
Let me know.
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Old 02-02-2011, 05:15 PM   #800
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What about a True North West, starting where the CDR leaves off and ending at the end of the Dempster, crossing the TCAT along the way........

Fall of 2012, all three should be ready to distribute. A series of routes in North America that are all interconnected.

Surprisingly difficult to do without pavement or "major" gravel roads. The only N/S route that is not paved is the Forestry Trunk Road (hwy 940/40) in western Alberta. and that requires several significant pavement excursions.

The Elk valley may hold some promise, but eventually must run on pavement, as that N/S corridor ends in Kootney NP, or the Columbia Valley, which in turn ends in Golden...no way north from there, unless you go west to a major road or east to the Forestry Trunk road.

The southern end of the Rockies is almost all covered with national parks, which have very limited road access. Northern BC is devoid of trails/logging roads that actually connect. Logging roads are very hard to connect between valley systems. From Ft. Nelson north (and possibly quite a bit further south than Ft. Nelson) there is only one road...The Alcan, that will take you to the Campbell highway, which is a gravel road. When the Cambell ends , you will need to traverse pavement until the start of the Dempster.

At the boarder you could possibly transit further west on back roads/abandoned rail beds, but eventually you would need to be on the Cassiar, another major gravel/paved road.

There is a remarkable difference between the Canadian Rockies and the American Rockies and it starts within 100 miles of the boarder. The ruggedness on the Canadian side is quite extreme. Passable corridors are rare, and tend to be highly traveled.
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Old 02-02-2011, 06:49 PM   #801
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The crappy coffee is at dunkin donuts,not at timmy's.

what he said!!.....but the best coffee is in my panniers ;-)
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Old 02-02-2011, 09:43 PM   #802
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Originally Posted by dwayne View Post
Surprisingly difficult to do without pavement or "major" gravel roads. The only N/S route that is not paved is the Forestry Trunk Road (hwy 940/40) in western Alberta. and that requires several significant pavement excursions.

The Elk valley may hold some promise, but eventually must run on pavement, as that N/S corridor ends in Kootney NP, or the Columbia Valley, which in turn ends in Golden...no way north from there, unless you go west to a major road or east to the Forestry Trunk road.

The southern end of the Rockies is almost all covered with national parks, which have very limited road access. Northern BC is devoid of trails/logging roads that actually connect. Logging roads are very hard to connect between valley systems. From Ft. Nelson north (and possibly quite a bit further south than Ft. Nelson) there is only one road...The Alcan, that will take you to the Campbell highway, which is a gravel road. When the Cambell ends , you will need to traverse pavement until the start of the Dempster.

At the boarder you could possibly transit further west on back roads/abandoned rail beds, but eventually you would need to be on the Cassiar, another major gravel/paved road.

There is a remarkable difference between the Canadian Rockies and the American Rockies and it starts within 100 miles of the boarder. The ruggedness on the Canadian side is quite extreme. Passable corridors are rare, and tend to be highly traveled.
I thought it was worth the slab/scenery ratio when I went to the Arctic Circle via the Dempster. I wanted to do the Campbell & CAnol raods but my riding partner wasn't into it. I put 10 000 km on a TKC 80 that trip. Well worth the slab seeing Muncho lake and coming back through the Cassiar



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Old 02-02-2011, 11:21 PM   #803
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I thought it was worth the slab/scenery ratio when I went to the Arctic Circle via the Dempster. I wanted to do the Campbell & CAnol raods but my riding partner wasn't into it. I put 10 000 km on a TKC 80 that trip. Well worth the slab seeing Muncho lake and coming back through the Cassiar



Not saying that the trip isn't worth it, just that it's hardly a "trail" for very significant portions. For that matter the Dempster (it's actually a commercial truck route) isn't really a trail, but it could be that I have misunderstood the intent of this enterprise.
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Old 02-03-2011, 07:58 AM   #804
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I think trail is a bit of a misdemeanor. The TCAT is a route comprised primarily of gravel roads. A trail here and there is included and so are paved roads when needed.

The TNE will be very similar in nature to the TCAT. +80% gravel roads (some wide, some narrow, some smooth, some bumpy) with the remainder being slab to connect these roads.

The TNW is just a concept at this time. We are aware that there are large chunks of it that will be paved. Just a guess but I would predict it's a 50/50 (gravel/paved) route. What we can do is ensure the route utilizes some fun gravel backroads where available, roads that folks heading that way might not normally ride or know about. There is also the added benefit of having the TNW utilize a section of the TCAT, creating some fun options of the western TAT, TCAT, TNW and the CDR.

As mentioned the TNW is conceptual at this point. The TNE will be completed this upcoming season, the TCAT will be completed in 2012 and we hope to also have the TNW completed at that time as well.

The terminus of the TNE





The Trans Taiga...670 kilometers of gravel (don't forget you have to turn around and re ride that mileage)

Quote from Wikipedia

The Transtaiga Road.
The Trans-Taiga Road (French: Route Transtaïga) is an extremely remote wilderness road in northern
Quebec, Canada. It is 582 kilometers (362 mi) long to Centrale Brisay and another 84 kilometers (52 mi) along the Caniapiscau Reservoir, all of it unpaved.
The road's northeastern terminus is almost at the 55th parallel, making it the northernmost continuous road in Eastern North America. Though the terminus is also the furthest point from any town (745 km or 466 miles from Radisson) via road in North America, it is nonetheless relatively close - 190 kilometers (118 mi) - to Schefferville geographically. It does not, however, provide access to it, as the intervening terrain is unpassable even in an all-terrain vehicle. The road's end is also close to the southern limit of Nunavik, Quebec's Inuit region.
The Trans-Taiga Road branches off from the James Bay Road (French: Route de la Baie James) at kilometer 544. It was built as an access road to the hydro-electric generating stations of Hydro-Québec along the La Grande River and Caniapiscau River. Several outfitters are established along this road, providing wilderness hunting and fishing expeditions, and some may also provide fuel, food and lodging. Otherwise, there are no services along this road.
While the Trans-Taiga Road is reportedly drivable by ordinary passenger vehicles for its entire length, Hydro-Quebec recommends use of 4WD vehicles for the section between Brisay and Caniapiscau, which is of a rougher grade than the rest of the road.
As the name of the road indicates, this road winds its way through Quebec's vast boreal forest, characterized by stunted spruce and pine, bogs and rocky outcroppings. Taiga is the Russian term for the same type of forest.









James Bay Highway, a fun remote paved road connnecting the North Road and the TT.





A nice side trip to James Bay





The North Road (Rue Du Nord)

400 kilometers of gravel, great secenery and a all around fun road.








The section of the TNE that piggy backs the TCAT looks great. This is Fab's sections of the route and I'm looking forward to riding it with him in May.





The Chic Choc mountains on the Gaspe Bay Penninsula





Crossing the St Lawrence river by ferry





For those who havent ridden on the "Gaspe", it's a nirvana of narrow, gravel backroads. A huge netwrok of them

The New Brunswick section of the TNE is just beggining, local input is being collected and that section may or maynot end up being "adopted"

I've been sent a few links by some locals and the riding looks outstanding for this type of route












For me, the New Brunswick section fo the TNE is very exciting as I haven't spent much time in this part of Canada. Over the next few months more information should become available as to who is helping and what area's will be included.

Cheers
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Old 02-04-2011, 02:52 PM   #805
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Any pictures of your sweet Rover on the Lingham Lake Hydro line? I thought I also remembered seeing some pics you took of the Haliburton Rail Trail as well.....post away, I'm sure some folks would enjoy reading about your travels on some of these roads (from a 4 wheeled vechicles perspective). Given that the "Main Route" will be suitable for a well prepared and appropriate 4 wheeled vechicle and I have had several enquires about folks thinking a support truck would be handy due to the length of this route (as well as from several "overland" 4 wheel vechicle folks, I have been cross posting lately onto one of their forums due to their interest), it would be nice to hear your opinion on a few of the roads/trails we intend to use. There has been some concern by folks that don't like the idea of "sharing" this route with the "landrover" crowd. Sorry but I have to laugh, when you get up here and ride the route and don't see any other vechicles for hours on end, you'll understand that this isn't going to become a super highway or anything. Heck you might even enjoy bumping into someone else on the route We are very realistic, we know there isn't going to be many folks who do the entire route. Heck not many folks have a summer off to begin with, but for the lucky ones who do.....enjoy, it's shaping up to be what we hoped for...a real expedition route across Canada. Varied terrain, scenery and cultures.
Alright, long time no post, but time to get caught up.

Before I get started with the truck stuff, just to show I belong here .

My bike at the end of the line. This is near Hastings, Ontario, during my own little "Ontario Overland Project" documented elsewhere, where I'm exploring and posting about all of the rail trails usable for exploration in Eastern Ontario.



Nice swimming spot near Madoc.



More here:

http://overlandcanada.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1078

So, on to the truck. Here it is:





But it's really more suited for this type of thing:



And towing my homebuilt offroad camping trailer:



I guess I'm one of the rare guys who likes getting out in/on any vehicle and had no prejudices. I even enjoy riding ATV's sometimes, and would love to get a snowmobile. It's all good in my book, and I really wish the different groups would cooperate more. I hear things like "XXX destroys the trails, I hate them!" coming from all groups. I think the greenies are winning a divide and conquer battle, currently. I don't see this kind of attitude from overlanders traveling on other continents, so I don't really see it as being helpful here. And as Ted states, there are not a lot of people on these trails in any case. I could usually count on one hand the number of other vehicles I saw on any given day.

As to the route, I know some of it from the area I have taken my truck, and would agree that much of it is completely doable in any normal truck. Heck, from what I've seen, much of it is doable in a car.

That may actually be a bad thing to some, I'd also love to see a true "trail" across Canada. But it's just not realistic for so many reasons. First, I just don't think the trails exist. Second... I've done the 2-day Corduroy Enduro, and it's just not the sort of thing I'm interested in doing for weeks on end while I'm supposed to be on vacation.
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Old 02-04-2011, 04:27 PM   #806
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Originally Posted by bumblebee1 View Post
I'm ready for that
Do I need to wait till 2012 or will you have something together to do it this summer.
I don't mind being the guinea pig.
I have a month off starting second week of July.
I won't be in a rush to get home.
Let me know.
What are you? A Government worker? A MONTH off??? Oh, You probibly are
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Old 02-05-2011, 06:01 AM   #807
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I think trail is a bit of a misdemeanor. The TCAT is a route comprised primarily of gravel roads. A trail here and there is included and so are paved roads when needed.
And I think you guys have a very good handle on what should be done.

We are a very diverse group, Adventure riders. On one end you have knife in the teeth, picking berries out of bear shit, hard core minimalist, true dirt riders. You are not going to please that guy until you kill him, make it so tough that a hernia ruptures and he turns into bear bait.
On the other end you have the latte, bed linen, fillet Mignon crowd. You are not going to please them until you have a TH every 50k and at least a four star establishment and the end of every day. Oh, and the motor grader needs to groom the path at least once a week.

For the other 90% of us, we are basically satisfied with knowing that we are on a public easement, that we can get fuel at reasonable intervals, and that there is a beer at the end of this. And that doesn't necessarily have to be cold. We will soak in the scenery and culture, and be a much better person for it.
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Old 02-05-2011, 07:57 AM   #808
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Amen +1 intothenew....couldn't have said it anybetter!

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And I think you guys have a very good handle on what should be done.

We are a very diverse group, Adventure riders. On one end you have knife in the teeth, picking berries out of bear shit, hard core minimalist, true dirt riders. You are not going to please that guy until you kill him, make it so tough that a hernia ruptures and he turns into bear bait.
On the other end you have the latte, bed linen, fillet Mignon crowd. You are not going to please them until you have a TH every 50k and at least a four star establishment and the end of every day. Oh, and the motor grader needs to groom the path at least once a week.

For the other 90% of us, we are basically satisfied with knowing that we are on a public easement, that we can get fuel at reasonable intervals, and that there is a beer at the end of this. And that doesn't necessarily have to be cold. We will soak in the scenery and culture, and be a much better person for it.
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Old 02-05-2011, 08:46 AM   #809
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I guess I'm one of the rare guys who likes getting out in/on any vehicle and had no prejudices. I even enjoy riding ATV's sometimes, and would love to get a snowmobile. It's all good in my book, and I really wish the different groups would cooperate more. I hear things like "XXX destroys the trails, I hate them!" coming from all groups. I think the greenies are winning a divide and conquer battle, currently. I don't see this kind of attitude from overlanders traveling on other continents, so I don't really see it as being helpful here. And as Ted states, there are not a lot of people on these trails in any case. I could usually count on one hand the number of other vehicles I saw on any given day.
Hi Rob, good to see you posting here and thanks again for some of the routes suggestions.

In my experience it is only the area's that are densly populated where the different user groups confilct. In most area's of Canada they rely on each other to keep roads/trails cleared and maintained. The different user groups are often times vital in maintaining legal access to roads/trails that benefit all forms of outdoor recreation.

The only times I have seen conflict is near major urban area's. When I lived in Squamish I thought it was a joke, the land was being carved up for different user groups. This valley for snowmobiles, this one for nordic skiing, this one for ....... This certainly isn't the norm in Canada. If it wasn't for the atv clubs and jeep clubs us motorcyclists wouldn't have nearly as many trails to ride

Oh ya, sweet Rover and that trailor is a campers dream
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Old 02-05-2011, 08:52 AM   #810
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And I think you guys have a very good handle on what should be done.

We are a very diverse group, Adventure riders. On one end you have knife in the teeth, picking berries out of bear shit, hard core minimalist, true dirt riders. You are not going to please that guy until you kill him, make it so tough that a hernia ruptures and he turns into bear bait.
On the other end you have the latte, bed linen, fillet Mignon crowd. You are not going to please them until you have a TH every 50k and at least a four star establishment and the end of every day. Oh, and the motor grader needs to groom the path at least once a week.

For the other 90% of us, we are basically satisfied with knowing that we are on a public easement, that we can get fuel at reasonable intervals, and that there is a beer at the end of this. And that doesn't necessarily have to be cold. We will soak in the scenery and culture, and be a much better person for it.
Thanks for the feedback, it's much appreciated.

Gave up trying to please everyone a while back. Seems to us that most of the comments from people who will actual utilize the route all seem to have a common theme. The distance will be challenging enough, no need to make the terrain crazy. An emphasis on remote out of the way places that you wouldn't normally see, utilizing gravel back roads whenever possible and a short technical challenege now and again to spice it up. This is what I forsee the TCAT being when it's all said and done
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