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Old 05-01-2013, 04:50 PM   #16816
browneye
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Oiler???

I have a mini can of PJ1 in the top box.
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Old 05-01-2013, 04:56 PM   #16817
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Front wheel hop?

BTW, I put my road tires back on the bike, the trails that came with it, they're such a great tire for mostly road.

Did a mountain trip last weekend, couple'a hundred miles, and was getting the dreaded wheel hop out front. Leaned over at 30 or so it was pretty noticeable.

So when I got home I got my spoke wrench back out as I had "tuned" all the spokes when I did the tire change and thought maybe I had pulled the front rim out of true. Nope, not a waiver, nothing, nada. Tire is true, really close in balance (static).

Then I grabbed the fork legs at the bottom to check the head bearings and found quite a bit of play. Pulled off the top clamp and tightened the nuts and the play went away. Seems I have no more wheel hop now. Keep an eye on those head bearings. About 6K miles on the bike.
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:20 AM   #16818
blacktiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bross View Post
Tried a ScottOiler on two of my bikes and didn't like them. Sure they kept the chain lubed but they flung gunk everywhere even though they were adjusted for proper flow, one to two drops a minute. And I think I spent more time trying to keep the tube end hitting the chain / sprockets than I ever have lubing a chain. More trouble than they're worth to me. Lubing isn't a chore and takes 5 minutes for both bikes on a trip so yeah I just don't worry about it.
Lets not get into another Scottoiler debate but I'll just say this:-
A Scottoiler lubricates for the whole of your journey whereas a spray lube just lubricates at the beginning, until it gets washed off or flings off. Also that constant drip of oil helps keep the chain cool so the internal grease doesn't melt and flow past the seals which is probably most of the reason chains last longer with a Scottoiler.
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:24 AM   #16819
WhereIsBobL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by some call me...tim View Post
While on the subject of chain adjustment, has anyone noticed their adjustment blocks on the swingarm not being symmetrical?
You have the left adjuster block upside-down. The back end is slanted. Probably does not really matter which way you put it in, but it will be visually different.
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:17 AM   #16820
markbvt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by some call me...tim View Post
While on the subject of chain adjustment, has anyone noticed their adjustment blocks on the swingarm not being symmetrical? I had the back wheel off the other weekend to put new tires on, and when we were getting everything reinstalled, my buddy noticed that the adjuster blocks were significantly different in their position on the swingarm.
Your left side one's upside down. Remove axle nut, remove block, flip it over, reinstall.

--mark

EDIT: Should have read further; several people beat me to it.
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:21 AM   #16821
cory1848
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Quote:
Originally Posted by browneye View Post
BTW, I put my road tires back on the bike, the trails that came with it, they're such a great tire for mostly road.

Did a mountain trip last weekend, couple'a hundred miles, and was getting the dreaded wheel hop out front. Leaned over at 30 or so it was pretty noticeable.

So when I got home I got my spoke wrench back out as I had "tuned" all the spokes when I did the tire change and thought maybe I had pulled the front rim out of true. Nope, not a waiver, nothing, nada. Tire is true, really close in balance (static).

Then I grabbed the fork legs at the bottom to check the head bearings and found quite a bit of play. Pulled off the top clamp and tightened the nuts and the play went away. Seems I have no more wheel hop now. Keep an eye on those head bearings. About 6K miles on the bike.
I will be checking this next. Hopefully my wheel hop issue is solved this easily.
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:39 AM   #16822
cory1848
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markbvt View Post
You don't need a center stand or swingarm spools. The chain is supposed to be adjusted with the bike on the sidestand. If you adjust it with the rear wheel off the ground, it'll be too tight when the suspension is compressed.

--mark
My manual says to adjust chain while the bike it upright with no weight on it. No mention of it being on the side stand.

Quote:
Place the motorcycle on a level surface and
hold it in an upright position with no weight
on it. Rotate the rear wheel by pushing the
motorcycle to find the position where the
chain is tightest, and measure the vertical
movement of the chain midway between the
sprockets.
I checked the alignment and tension and the alignment was off about 1/16 of an inch. I fixed that my rear brake stuttering problem when away. The chain measured from the bottom seems to have about 40-50mm of play which I am questioning too loose? I know it is recommended to run the chains a little loose on the XCs but that seems like a lot. On my sportsbikes I have owned in the past, the chain was alway set with about an inch play while I was sitting on it. But that was race suspension without the travel of the XC. So would a chain being too loose cause the dreaded 4k vibration?

Finally got ahold of a service manual so will be checking torque on every bolt I can find this weekend. I suspect maybe a loose exhaust system bolt somewhere as well.
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Old 05-02-2013, 07:52 AM   #16823
Gronked
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800 Roadie vs BMW 1200GSA

Appologies if this has been covered elsewhere, I looked but didn't find anything.

I'm wondering if anyone can give an insight as to how the T800 roadie (NOT THE XC) would compare with the BMW1200GSA off road and adventure riding in general.

Both have the 19" front, but the GSA has spoked wheels.

T800 is lighter and easier to get your feet on the ground.

I don't know specs like ground clearance and suspension travel.

I just ask because I test-road the T800 and REALLY liked it... but didn't take it off the tarmac. I have owned a GSA in the past and done some easy dirt with it.

So as an adv bike and the one bike to own if you can own only one bike, would the T800 go anywhere the GSA would?

Assuming 1up only, limited off road skills, not intending to go mental in the dirt. Living in Australia, there is probly no dire need for the 33ltr GSA fuel tank.

Thanks :)
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Old 05-02-2013, 08:42 AM   #16824
Rob Dirt
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Just an old dirtbike subject, but I put my rear axle nut on the brake side. That way if it hits a rock then it will get tighter instead of loose.
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Old 05-02-2013, 08:47 AM   #16825
browneye
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gronked View Post
Appologies if this has been covered elsewhere, I looked but didn't find anything.

I'm wondering if anyone can give an insight as to how the T800 roadie (NOT THE XC) would compare with the BMW1200GSA off road and adventure riding in general.

Both have the 19" front, but the GSA has spoked wheels.

T800 is lighter and easier to get your feet on the ground.

I don't know specs like ground clearance and suspension travel.

I just ask because I test-road the T800 and REALLY liked it... but didn't take it off the tarmac. I have owned a GSA in the past and done some easy dirt with it.

So as an adv bike and the one bike to own if you can own only one bike, would the T800 go anywhere the GSA would?

Assuming 1up only, limited off road skills, not intending to go mental in the dirt. Living in Australia, there is probly no dire need for the 33ltr GSA fuel tank.

Thanks :)

The A model GS is a special upgraded model. You really should be comparing to a standard R1200GS. The A has upgraded suspension, bigger tank, lots of guards and armor. It's taller and heavier, and has a lower first gear for crawling. It would be a little more adventure oriented than the T800.

Spoked wheels are an option on a GS. (Not sure about the A model) Standard are cast wheels like the Tiger. OTOH the spoked wheels on a GS are configured for tubeless tires.

The Tiger feels svelt and lively, the GS not so much.

Either bike will go anywhere you want to take it.

I have ridden both, as well as the Super Tenere. I did not bother with the Explorer, by the time I got to the Triumph store I had already elminated liter-plus bikes because they are so bulky. At the time I liked the Tenere better than the GS. The later felt cumbersome, shifted clunky, clutch is kind of odd (dry clutch) and the torque when you goose the throttle tries to rotate the bike over. I liked it just fine 2-up on the freeway, cruises nice and comfortable with good passing power. The Tenere was smoother and more refined, shifted like butter, but also feels really heavy at slow speed maneuvering for parking. Now having owned the 800XC for the better part of a year and 6K miles, I'd strongly suggest trying the Explorer 1200 if you're looking for the biggest bikes. And if you're going to spend that much money and that big of bike, and you mainly ride on the road, also look at Ducati Multistrada and Moto Guzzi Stelvio. On a budget the new Honda Crosstourer is getting favorable response, and there's the venerable Suzuki V-Strom big and small.

The GS is extremely popular and there is tons of aftermarket support. They hold their value well and are quite dependable, although there are known failures of the final drive, and they can be very expensive to maintain if you rely on the dealer. Older used models come up and can be a good buy on a budget.

The T800 is a different animal really, smooth and agile, I prefer it's suspension over the GS. The 19" front wheel is realy the only similarity, everything else is different. I would encourage you to ride both and decide for yourself. Either will tour on the hiway just fine, and either will venture off on dirt roads just fine as well. Either can be configured easily for luggage.

EDIT: BTW, you didn't mention budget. A T800 and a loaded GSA are like ten grand difference in cost. I've suggested a spread of new bike costs from about 8 grand to over 20.
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:39 AM   #16826
jimjim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Dirt View Post
Just an old dirtbike subject, but I put my rear axle nut on the brake side. That way if it hits a rock then it will get tighter instead of loose.
Man if I hit a rock that hard to loosen a nut that's been tightened to 80 ft lbs. I'm thinking I might have more serious problems.
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Old 05-02-2013, 11:23 AM   #16827
fullmonte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjim View Post
Man if I hit a rock that hard to loosen a nut that's been tightened to 80 ft lbs. I'm thinking I might have more serious problems.
Yep, and dont make the mistake of over tightening it, so that it can be loosened for a trail/road side tire change, since most of us don't carry along a breaker bar in our tool kits. I had two flats last winter and may have stayed at a Holiday Inn Express to acquire this wisdom.
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:59 PM   #16828
fbj913
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fullmonte View Post
Yep, and dont make the mistake of over tightening it, so that it can be loosened for a trail/road side tire change, since most of us don't carry along a breaker bar in our tool kits. I had two flats last winter and may have stayed at a Holiday Inn Express to acquire this wisdom.
decently long size crescent wrench does the trick. if need be you just use your foot to push it. i keep one under the rear seat.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:38 PM   #16829
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Originally Posted by fbj913 View Post
decently long size crescent wrench does the trick. if need be you just use your foot to push it. i keep one under the rear seat.
I use one of these. Works great.
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:56 PM   #16830
jmcg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gronked View Post
Appologies if this has been covered elsewhere, I looked but didn't find anything.

I'm wondering if anyone can give an insight as to how the T800 roadie (NOT THE XC) would compare with the BMW1200GSA off road and adventure riding in general.

Both have the 19" front, but the GSA has spoked wheels.

T800 is lighter and easier to get your feet on the ground.

I don't know specs like ground clearance and suspension travel.

I just ask because I test-road the T800 and REALLY liked it... but didn't take it off the tarmac. I have owned a GSA in the past and done some easy dirt with it.

So as an adv bike and the one bike to own if you can own only one bike, would the T800 go anywhere the GSA would?

Assuming 1up only, limited off road skills, not intending to go mental in the dirt. Living in Australia, there is probly no dire need for the 33ltr GSA fuel tank.

Thanks :)
I can't speak from experience for the GS/GSA, but I can say that the Roadie will handle easy dirt in Australian conditions.

We spent 2 weeks doing a 2up ride (mostly tarmac) with no issues worth reporting.

I was commuting over 100kms every day on the bike in reasonable comfort.

My wife rides the roadie on dirt trails around home with no dramas.

Fuel range is not an issue unless you're really going off the beaten track. Save on size and weight for everyday use, take a fuel bladder if going bush I reckon..

Tubeless tyres are the way to go for incompetents like me

The Tiger in general is, as so many here have reported, a great 'all round' bike.

The roadie will go most places the XC can, missing out on some suspension travel, etc.. It's up to how you ride and use it, I guess.

The roadie was the easy choice for us because we wanted to tour on-road mainly with the ability to follow some dirt tracks occasionally. I don't feel the need to take a 'big' bike on really gnarly single track, so it suits my purposes just fine.

Sorry I can't offer more of a comparison, but as someone has said, I think you're comparing two bikes that aren't really in the same category (price, weight, off-road ability, range).

What I can say is: if you choose the Tiger, you won't be disappointed.

All the best.

Cheers,

JM.
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