ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Beasts > The British Invasion: Triumph Tigers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-09-2013, 07:29 AM   #18331
Higgs Boson
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2013
Oddometer: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by pilot3 View Post
Quite personal, don't ya think? Ok, 185.
as are one's chosen spring rate! ;-) Thanks! I think I will try out the same rates although I am 195, I'd like to get back down to my Fighting Weight....I am at my, uh, Reading Weight at the moment.
Higgs Boson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 08:54 AM   #18332
WIMAK
Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2013
Location: Kenosha
Oddometer: 26
Hey guys, less than a week and already planning on first service. lol. I have a buddy that can supply me with Amsoil, has anyone given the dealer oil for the first service?
WIMAK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 10:24 AM   #18333
henkew
Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Lake Stevens, WA
Oddometer: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by henkew View Post
My Tiger 800XC throttle died on me. It starts, but turn the throttle and nothing. I took the handle off and the throttle cable is kinked up, it locked down at the engine. I can start it and it will move on the idle throttle level. Not sure what that means, trying to figure that out now. And can you believe it, right when the full warranty from Triumph expired. I am in Chistochina, Alaska. Halfway through a 3 week trip. I know there is a Triumph dealership in Anchorage. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks!

UPDATE
Cable is severed, in the middle. This seems unusal, how often does this happen. Can I use a bicycle cable to get me to anchorage? I am just suprised at this. Those things don't seem like they would be under the stress to cause them to just break in the middle.
Trip ended up awesome, I'm working on the writeup/pictures now. Thanks again everyone for the help.

The pull cable snapped because the angle of the hard end of the sheath where it comes off the engine. I am told most Tiger 800's are installed this way. I'm thinking my risers must have added a bit of strain that caused the angle to be even more pronounced. The Motorcycle Shop in Anchorage was awesome, they went above and beyond to take care of me. Can't say enough good about these guys. But when they installed the new cables, he modified the sheath so there is no longer a hard angle down. Just a smooth run straight out. I should try and get some before/after pictures but there is no strain on it now.

Made it to Anchorage by swapping the pull/push cables. Not the safest way to go up and down the mountains, trying to make sure I remember how to speed up and slow down (reversed from normal). But I made it!
henkew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 10:47 AM   #18334
ducnut
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: central IL
Oddometer: 3,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIMAK View Post
Hey guys, less than a week and already planning on first service. lol. I have a buddy that can supply me with Amsoil, has anyone given the dealer oil for the first service?
All shops are different. The one worked at had no issues with it, unless it was something not motorcycle-use approved.
__________________
'09 Triumph Tiger1050
'96 Ducati 900SS
'02 Suzuki SV650S (hers)
ducnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 10:59 AM   #18335
markbvt
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Georgia, Vermont (that's one town, not two states)
Oddometer: 2,684
Quote:
Originally Posted by browneye View Post
Me neither.
Had some with an out of balance scorp rally (stock tire) and loose head bearings, and every once in awhile I get some on bumpy pavement, but it's not a shimmy or bounce. Front is a little stiff initially so maybe some 5w fluid would help.Will probly do a fluid change and check the air gap.

For 8K miles it's been pretty darn flawless.

Okay, my reply is a little delayed, but I was on vacation last week and wasn't keeping up with this thread.

I've got over 46,000 miles on my XC now. I've run a couple of sets of Battlewings, a Kenda Big Block front with Shinko 705 rear (and a Shinko 705 front when that Kenda wore out in 3000 miles), an IRC TR8 front with Full Bore M40 rear, and numerous sets of Full Bores front and rear. And I've never had this bounce issue a few of you guys are talking about.

The Kenda was prone to a little headshake at highway speeds (mostly due to turbulence from traffic ahead of me); all other tires, including the IRC knobby, have worked out great.

It would be very interesting to know what's causing the bounce; seems some roadies are affected by it too. A friend of mine traded his roadie in because he couldn't tolerate it anymore (unfortunately he traded it for a Multistrada, which has given him suspension problems too with its electronics failing on him).

--mark
__________________
'11 Triumph Tiger 800 XC / '03 Honda XR650L / '01 Triumph Bonneville cafe

My ride reports: Missile silos, Labrador, twisties, and more

Bennington Triumph Bash, May 30-June 1, 2014
markbvt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 12:45 PM   #18336
cory1848
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Kissimmee Florida
Oddometer: 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbvt View Post

It would be very interesting to know what's causing the bounce; seems some roadies are affected by it too. A friend of mine traded his roadie in because he couldn't tolerate it anymore (unfortunately he traded it for a Multistrada, which has given him suspension problems too with its electronics failing on him).

--mark
I think the real problem is that no one knows what the cause is. Some people have had success "fixing" by swapping tires, suspension, hubs, entire front end but IMO that is fixing the symptoms, not the cause. My 2013 XC has is and it is annoying as hell. Put any weight on the bag, even empty cases, and the handling goes to shit. The only thing I have left to try is a full replacement of internal parts. Traxxion AK-20 kit goes for $1300. I am tempting to just do that and call it a day. I would lose that amount of money 3 fold if I were to trade it in on something else. I want to start enjoying my bike but the front end makes it difficult.
__________________
Current ride: 2013 Yamaha Super Tenere
Past rides: 2013 Triumph Tiger 800XC, 1997 Honda Goldwing SE, 2003 Kawasaki Ninja 6RR, 1997 Suzuki TL1000S, 1995 Suzuki Katana 600, 1985 Suzuki GS550EF, 1980 Suzuki GS250T
cory1848 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 01:58 PM   #18337
MotoTex
Miles of Smiles
 
MotoTex's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Tool Shed
Oddometer: 1,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by cory1848 View Post
I think the real problem is that no one knows what the cause is. Some people have had success "fixing" by swapping tires, suspension, hubs, entire front end but IMO that is fixing the symptoms, not the cause. My 2013 XC has is and it is annoying as hell. Put any weight on the bag, even empty cases, and the handling goes to shit. The only thing I have left to try is a full replacement of internal parts. Traxxion AK-20 kit goes for $1300. I am tempting to just do that and call it a day. I would lose that amount of money 3 fold if I were to trade it in on something else. I want to start enjoying my bike but the front end makes it difficult.
I keep reading about this and feel lucky to not have experienced the problem.

Yesterday I put the Caribou 40L panniers on and made a run to town to fill up with fuel and pick up a couple of 12-packs of soda. It was about a thirty mile round trip and I was carving corners as if the bags weren't there in both directions. I have never experienced wheel hop on this bike over the 6K miles I have on it.

This 2013 800XC has the pre-load on the shock about eight clicks off from fully preloaded, I have a tank bag (maybe eight pounds) a tail bag (probably ten pounds with tubes, slime pump, tire tools, and rain gear) and it is shod with Shinko 705's. Rider weight with gear is around 250 pounds.

There must be something different on the bikes experiencing the issue, maybe this data will help in some way.
__________________

This is The Internet. Confirm for yourself anything you may see while visiting this strange and uncertain land.

MotoTex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 02:01 PM   #18338
Yossarian™
Deputy Cultural Attaché
 
Yossarian™'s Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: the 'Ha
Oddometer: 9,638
I've posted before about the XC "hop" and will again, I guess. I had it early on, but took the time to true my front wheel after the spokes had bedded in, and that cured it entirely. Weight on the back of the bike makes no difference. Anyone who owns an XC and has the "hop" issue would be well served to perform a simple check of the front wheel trueness.
__________________
Successfully surviving motorcycling since 1976.
Yossarian™ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 03:57 PM   #18339
browneye
PIN IT & BANG GEARS
 
browneye's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Orange County, CA
Oddometer: 5,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian
I've posted before about the XC "hop" and will again, I guess. I had it early on, but took the time to true my front wheel after the spokes had bedded in, and that cured it entirely. Weight on the back of the bike makes no difference. Anyone who owns an XC and has the "hop" issue would be well served to perform a simple check of the front wheel trueness.
^^ This.

I really think it's a cause of out of true and/or tire balance. Once it starts I'm pretty sure it will wear a tire unevenly making curing it even more difficult.

I had it pretty bad on a road trip after removing my FB's and putting the stock trails back on. Didn't get the balance right, had the hop. Stemhead bearings were a bit loose too, not much grease on them. And there's a service bulletin on the head bearings, something about changing a washer between the bearing stop nut and the upper triple clamp. I didn't bother with it, everything went back together fine.

Anyone with wheel hop needs to tune their spokes and balance their tire. That'll probly fix it or at least reduce it dramatically.

I don't know how many peeps check their spoke tension. Both the Tiger and my Husky get loose spokes. I tap them with a spoke wrench for the 'tink' sound that should be a ring and not a thud. If the wheel is true in the first place, tightening all the spokes the same will leave it true. Tune them by sound. I suspect run-out is highly critical for this setup.

An ounce out of balance will also be felt on the front end at varying speeds. Get a Parm balancer and do them yourself. I use the axle on a couple of crates allowing the axle to rotate and not rely on the wheel bearing - they induce too much friction. If the axle can rotate you can get very close to perfect balance. I notice vibration starting at speeds over 85-90. I rarely ride that fast. Motion-pro sells a box of wheel weights that are narrow enough to fit on the rim lip. Weights for car wheels are too wide, will not fit right on a motorcycle rim. The husky has a rim lock and can take 3 or more ounces of balance weights - that's a lot of quarter-ounce little tire weights. There' a row on each side of the rim. I have a few lead weights I'll throw in there, they take up a LOT less space than the damn steel ones we can now only get here in CA. F'ing nanny state.
__________________
Chris Brown - "The Browneye"
"Without Motorcycles, People Live Very Boring Lives." - Malcolm Smith
Camp Nelson 2014 RRLaguna Seca 2012 RRSequoia 3-Day CampoutThanksgiving 2012
browneye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 08:28 PM   #18340
cory1848
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Kissimmee Florida
Oddometer: 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yossarian™ View Post
I've posted before about the XC "hop" and will again, I guess. I had it early on, but took the time to true my front wheel after the spokes had bedded in, and that cured it entirely. Weight on the back of the bike makes no difference. Anyone who owns an XC and has the "hop" issue would be well served to perform a simple check of the front wheel trueness.
Dealer checked it for me when I was first complaining about the problem. So unless they told me they checked it and really didn't, I can rule that out. As I have mentioned previously in my post, all the "simple" checks have been done. I don't believe there is a one all simple fix for this otherwise Triumph wouldn't be authorizing wheel and front end replacement parts to try and cure it. Wish it was that simple in my case.
__________________
Current ride: 2013 Yamaha Super Tenere
Past rides: 2013 Triumph Tiger 800XC, 1997 Honda Goldwing SE, 2003 Kawasaki Ninja 6RR, 1997 Suzuki TL1000S, 1995 Suzuki Katana 600, 1985 Suzuki GS550EF, 1980 Suzuki GS250T
cory1848 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 09:09 PM   #18341
MotoTex
Miles of Smiles
 
MotoTex's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Location: Tool Shed
Oddometer: 1,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by cory1848 View Post
Dealer checked it for me when I was first complaining about the problem. So unless they told me they checked it and really didn't, I can rule that out. As I have mentioned previously in my post, all the "simple" checks have been done. I don't believe there is a one all simple fix for this otherwise Triumph wouldn't be authorizing wheel and front end replacement parts to try and cure it. Wish it was that simple in my case.
A fellow once told me, "you get what you inspect, not what you expect."

Get the front wheel in the air so it will spin. Put a zip-tie on the fork leg and rotate the long end to the edge of the rim, or hold a straight-edge or a pencil against the fork leg with a pointy end near the inner or outer edge of the wheel.

Turn the wheel and look for the edge of the rim to deviate up or down from the pointy end. This is how you check for out of round.

While you are turning the wheel, also look for the edge of the rim to move toward or away from the pointy end of whatever you are using, side to side. This is how to check for true.

Now you will know by your own hand whether or not the wheel is out of round and/or of true.

Sometimes mechanics only get the scribblings describing the problem by whoever took the bike in. Often the brief note on the ticket isn't enough for them to completely understand the details of the problem.
__________________

This is The Internet. Confirm for yourself anything you may see while visiting this strange and uncertain land.

MotoTex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 08:13 AM   #18342
cory1848
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Kissimmee Florida
Oddometer: 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
A fellow once told me, "you get what you inspect, not what you expect."

Get the front wheel in the air so it will spin. Put a zip-tie on the fork leg and rotate the long end to the edge of the rim, or hold a straight-edge or a pencil against the fork leg with a pointy end near the inner or outer edge of the wheel.

Turn the wheel and look for the edge of the rim to deviate up or down from the pointy end. This is how you check for out of round.

While you are turning the wheel, also look for the edge of the rim to move toward or away from the pointy end of whatever you are using, side to side. This is how to check for true.

Now you will know by your own hand whether or not the wheel is out of round and/or of true.

Sometimes mechanics only get the scribblings describing the problem by whoever took the bike in. Often the brief note on the ticket isn't enough for them to completely understand the details of the problem.
I have done that and cannot see any real issues that would cause me to strip it down and retrue it. The dealer put in on their truing stand and said it was within spec so they ruled that out.

I will be changing tires soon and will be doing that myself. I will buy one of those truing stands and tools to triple check it myself. I really hope it is something that simple to fix, would save a lot of headaches, however I am not optimistic about it.
__________________
Current ride: 2013 Yamaha Super Tenere
Past rides: 2013 Triumph Tiger 800XC, 1997 Honda Goldwing SE, 2003 Kawasaki Ninja 6RR, 1997 Suzuki TL1000S, 1995 Suzuki Katana 600, 1985 Suzuki GS550EF, 1980 Suzuki GS250T
cory1848 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 10:04 AM   #18343
browneye
PIN IT & BANG GEARS
 
browneye's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Orange County, CA
Oddometer: 5,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by cory1848 View Post
I have done that and cannot see any real issues that would cause me to strip it down and retrue it. The dealer put in on their truing stand and said it was within spec so they ruled that out.

I will be changing tires soon and will be doing that myself. I will buy one of those truing stands and tools to triple check it myself. I really hope it is something that simple to fix, would save a lot of headaches, however I am not optimistic about it.
So, where else would a front end bump come from when rolling on a smooth surface? It has to come from the wheel assembly/front end of the bike. It ain't commin' from the back!

If the stemhead bearings are loose then any undulations could cause an occilating sensation.

There just aren't that many variables up there...just go thru everything step by step. Start with tire balance, check for a lumpy tire, cupping wear, etc..
__________________
Chris Brown - "The Browneye"
"Without Motorcycles, People Live Very Boring Lives." - Malcolm Smith
Camp Nelson 2014 RRLaguna Seca 2012 RRSequoia 3-Day CampoutThanksgiving 2012
browneye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 11:47 AM   #18344
bross
Where we riding to?
 
bross's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Osoyoos, BC
Oddometer: 4,524
Quote:
Originally Posted by browneye View Post
So, where else would a front end bump come from when rolling on a smooth surface? It has to come from the wheel assembly/front end of the bike. It ain't commin' from the back!

If the stemhead bearings are loose then any undulations could cause an occilating sensation.

There just aren't that many variables up there...just go thru everything step by step. Start with tire balance, check for a lumpy tire, cupping wear, etc..
It can. I rode a Yamaha V-Star that had a similar bounce. Drove me and the dealer nuts, they checked/adjusted everything in the front and even started playing with fork oil weights, heights etc. Turned out to be an out of balance rear tire/wheel that would transmit the oscillations up through the frame. The rear never did bounce or give any hint that the problem was back there.
bross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 02:38 PM   #18345
browneye
PIN IT & BANG GEARS
 
browneye's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Orange County, CA
Oddometer: 5,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by bross View Post
It can. I rode a Yamaha V-Star that had a similar bounce. Drove me and the dealer nuts, they checked/adjusted everything in the front and even started playing with fork oil weights, heights etc. Turned out to be an out of balance rear tire/wheel that would transmit the oscillations up through the frame. The rear never did bounce or give any hint that the problem was back there.
Well...I'll be dipped in shit!!

So yeah, I would start with tire balance then, front and back, and for any tire wear anomolies or bulges in the tread. I'm thinking minor cupping on the front that would be very difficult to see could cause this bouncing sensation. When mine was doing it it was only when leaned over just a bit in a sweeper at fairly low speed. At higher speed it becomes a vibration do to frequency of the imbalance point as the wheel turns.
__________________
Chris Brown - "The Browneye"
"Without Motorcycles, People Live Very Boring Lives." - Malcolm Smith
Camp Nelson 2014 RRLaguna Seca 2012 RRSequoia 3-Day CampoutThanksgiving 2012
browneye is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014