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Old 05-08-2012, 02:05 PM   #12706
C5INC
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Keep us posted on this. I've got the Triumph tall, adjustable screen and not impressed. That would be WAY to easy if it bolted up to my adjustable brackets!

Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktiger View Post
I've had a quick look at that and there's completely different brackets and mountings on it. However, I'm going to ask a friend of mine if I can unbolt the screen from his Explorer and offer it up to my Palmer brackets. He reckons the Explorer screen is the dogs nuts (and here's the qualification) for him.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:17 PM   #12707
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Originally Posted by Dr. Motardo View Post
I don't know, I kind of think the MSF basic skills class could still be helpful. They really do help if you've picked up any bad habits over the years. Of course, these classes vary depending on location and instructor so my experience could be very different from yours. Also, it's been about 10 years since I last took an MSF class of any kind.

I learned the most and had the most fun at an American Supercamp. I highly recommend these camps, even though they're aimed at dirt track racing. They do a good job of breaking up the class into groups with similar skills and you ride and crash on a controlled course. When you fall, the bikes are small enough that bruises are typically the worst you'll experience. I hadn't ridden in the dirt for over 20 years when I took this 2 day class and I learned a lot and had a blast.

http://www.americansupercamp.com/ind...id=10&Itemid=3
Plus ONE on American Super camp!
Learning to slide a bike flat track style does wonders for your street skills.
Can't really explain W H Y ... but it really does work ... somehow?
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:26 PM   #12708
Rob Dirt
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Originally Posted by PYG RYDR View Post
I am looking to purchase a new XC and want to know which Triumph accessories owners think should be purchased with the bike. I know it is a preference thing. I have looked at this forum and the UK forum. Still undecided and looking for input.
I like the triumph fender extender (I glued mine on),skid plate, & engine guards. However, the first thing you should buy is risers. I use the 20mm risers & that's plenty to rotate the bars where I want them. Without risers it has a lean forward position & the throttle cables rub against the plastic tank shroud on full turn to the right.
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:41 PM   #12709
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C5INC View Post
Keep us posted on this. I've got the Triumph tall, adjustable screen and not impressed. That would be WAY to easy if it bolted up to my adjustable brackets!

It wont. Its totally different.
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:03 PM   #12710
bross
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PYG RYDR View Post
I am looking to purchase a new XC and want to know which Triumph accessories owners think should be purchased with the bike. I know it is a preference thing. I have looked at this forum and the UK forum. Still undecided and looking for input.

TIA

Items I know I want:
skid plate-OEM? Motech? Other?
saddlebag luggage-OEM? TRAX? ???
center stand-OEM? Motech? ???
protection bars-OEM? Other?
hand guards-OEM? Other?
other items.
Here's the list I gave my dealer to install, pick mine up next week...

- ADVENTURE TAIL PACK KIT
- CENTRE STAND KIT - TIGER 800 XC
- HEATED GRIP KIT
- SUMP GUARD
- ENGINE PROTECTION BARS
- ADJUSTABLE HIGH SCREEN KIT
- FRONT MUDGUARD EXTENSION KIT
- AUXILIARY POWER SOCKET KIT
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:25 PM   #12711
UtahFox
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Originally Posted by cug View Post
It might still help you (and me) but if you are experienced on two wheels, scooter or bike, and have 10 years of riding done, you can get on much better trainings. Like a beginner track day where they teach you how to ride corners properly, not necessarily fast but correct, teach you how and when to break, and also give you some important skills for properly riding a street motorcycle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Motardo View Post
I learned the most and had the most fun at an American Supercamp. I highly recommend these camps, even though they're aimed at dirt track racing. They do a good job of breaking up the class into groups with similar skills and you ride and crash on a controlled course. When you fall, the bikes are small enough that bruises are typically the worst you'll experience. I hadn't ridden in the dirt for over 20 years when I took this 2 day class and I learned a lot and had a blast.
Thanks, both great ideas. I think I'll look into the Supercamp first - I'm not working ATM and they have a combined Road/Dirt camp in June. Just signed up!
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:31 PM   #12712
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Originally Posted by Dr. Motardo View Post
I don't know, I kind of think the MSF basic skills class could still be helpful.
It certainly is better than nothing. My point was that for the time and money I would do something different - just because the "different" part generally makes it better.

The MSF is very institutionalized and bureaucratic. The most recent reviews of classes I have heard about, the tenor was "it could have been good if they were actually adjusting to the abilities of the riders - but they don't seem to be allowed to".

My own experience: I got my bike license in Germany where a lot of hours 1:1 with a teacher are required and that helps insanely as they drill things into you that the MSF classes have no time for (and possibly sometimes no clue about). Okay, I had a really good teacher, admitted.

When I did the MSF basic class together with my wife (she wanted the bike license, too, and I needed the California license), it was a joke. The class room was super boring for me (again, admitted I had to sit through 15 hours of class in Germany and take a way more complex test) the two days on the parking lot were even worse.

For real beginners: do it! It's sooooo much better than trying it on your own or with someone who never learned how to teach basic skills.

Regarding the advanced class: My wife has done about 8k miles since she got the license three years ago and she would fall from the bike because she would get too sleepy there ... I've lost track how many miles I have done overall, but it's likely to be more around 150k to 200k since I started riding a 50cc Vespa and the class gave me exactly nothing even after years of not riding at all. Not surprising, but still annoying as I had hoped to get at least a tiny little bit out of the "advanced" training - but the main difference is that you do the basic class program on your own bike.

Every single thing they did we did for several weekends over the last three years on big parking lots with our own cones. We did figure eight runs until it was absolutely fluid, swerves, braking, pushing the bike, and so on. Way more than we ever had a chance of doing in these classes.

I've done some safety training classes back when I was in Germany and they were much better because they concentrated on each single person's technique instead of pressing a handful of totally different riders into a fixed curriculum.

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Originally Posted by Dr. Motardo View Post
THAT I find very interesting. Might have to do one of these classes! Sounds super fun and interesting.
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:35 PM   #12713
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Snagged a '12 800 ABS Roadie two days ago. Traded in my beloved '05 F650GS.
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:42 PM   #12714
dwoodward
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Snagged a '12 800 ABS Roadie two days ago. Traded in my beloved '05 F650GS.
Congratulations! You'll want to be careful of the loud handle for a bit...
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:44 PM   #12715
Evomx971
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Bags Connection Daypack tankbag

Wanted a small tankbag for my XC and always wanted to try one of the quick lock bags. I thought about installing one of those SAE electrical pass-thru connectors in it, but instead I think I'll just get a Powerlet cord that will reach from the outlet next to the key and just leave it unzipped about a 1/4" in the front and run the cord in there when I want the bag "electrified" to charge a phone or whatever. Last pic is of the bag expanded.







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Old 05-08-2012, 08:10 PM   #12716
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Seems like several new owners are looking for thoughts on must-do mods and what options are working... 2011 800XC ABS, 8,000 miles... I'd estimate 2,000 of that has been unpaved. Here's my list in what I'd consider a loose priority order.
  • Coax lead for Warm and Safe jacket and glove liners. I rode all winter this year.
  • Jesse cases
  • Mad Stad Adventure windscreen - tried the stock and the tall Triumph screen first. Quickly removeable for hot weather and off-road
  • Motech 20mm risers - a must after I put the windscreen on
  • Triumph centerstand
  • RAM mount handlebar mount bolt
  • Givi top case plate and homemade cutting board rear rack
  • Motech skidplate - tried the Triumph one first but liked the oil filter protection of the Motech better
  • Triumph engine guards
  • Acerbis mud flap to protect the shock
  • TKC80's (only run them if I know I'll be doing considerable off-road)
  • Barkbuster handguards with Storm plastics
  • Triumph heated grips - not as important after I got the heated liners, but still nice for when I don't use the liners
  • Arrow exhaust - just cuz it sounds so good
  • Fenda Extenda from Twisted Throttle
  • Bags Connection Daypack quick lock tankbag
  • Kaoko cruise control
Fantastic bike... couldn't be happier.
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Old 05-09-2012, 08:11 AM   #12717
Dr. Motardo
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Thanks, both great ideas. I think I'll look into the Supercamp first - I'm not working ATM and they have a combined Road/Dirt camp in June. Just signed up!
Hopefully you'll have a lot of fun and learn something. As the good Grifter said, the skills you hone at Supercamp do somehow transfer to the road. Their training helped my braking skills and my cornering skills, especially on poor surfaces. The big bonus of course is that if you screw up, you crash someone else's bike and not your own!

As for those must have mods, I'm taking a different approach on this bike. So far I've added the Triumph skid plate and heated grips and I'm still waiting on the center stand. Recently I installed a RAM mount on the instrument cluster bracket (just go back a few pages for the details I copied) for my old Magellan GPS. Couldn't find a fitted mount for the Magellan but RAM's X-mount works pretty well. I will not add hard panniers and I'll almost certainly avoid engine guards and aftermarket exhaust. I may eventually break down and spring for an exhaust but only if it cuts significant weight. For me, this bike is already too heavy, which is my main reasoning for choosing the Triumph skid plate and avoiding hard luggage and engine guards. We'll see if I can stick to my guns.

For luggage, I'm taking a bare bones approach. After a lot of looking around, I settled on the SW Motech rear rack because I liked the selection of quick release adapter plates for mounting top cases. I already had a glossy black Givi E-370 so I'll be using that on the Tiger when I'm not using it on my 250 GTS. Over the years I've spent a lot of money modding bikes and I promised myself this one would be different, so I'll be using as much of the stuff I have on hand as possible. The Wolfman tank bag and tail bag I already had on hand work perfectly with the Tiger. For the trips I take, all I'll ever really need is the Givi with the Explorer Lite tank bag. When I travel lighter, I can remove the Givi and it's quick release plate and substitute the Wolfman tail bag. I love how this stuff quickly and easily interchanges.

I'm still mulling over risers and and wind screen options. There are days when I feel like I need risers and other days where I'm perfectly happy. I'm also pretty satisfied with the stock screen, but like all screens, it's not perfect. It just proves that, for me, Triumph provided a pretty well sorted out bike that works very well for me.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:20 PM   #12718
fbj913
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I'm about 2 MSF/rider safety course, Harely bashings away from unsubscribing from this thread.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:39 PM   #12719
Mercury264
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Originally Posted by fbj913 View Post
I'm about 2 MSF/rider safety course, Harely bashings away from unsubscribing from this thread.
I think you need to chill a little. That's how these things go - so what if we have a slight detour every now and again

What else is there really to talk about, this thread has probably covered 99% of all things Tigger 800 at this point.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:00 PM   #12720
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Originally Posted by fbj913 View Post
I'm about 2 MSF/rider safety course, Harely bashings away from unsubscribing from this thread.
Hey, maybe it's time to go for a ride.
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