ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-08-2010, 08:11 AM   #31
slabm7
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: Cochrane, AB
Oddometer: 302
I'm in, looks like a great ride!
__________________
03 Honda XR650R dual sported
1999 Honda VTR1000


Nobody EVER lies on their death bed and says "I should have worked more".
slabm7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 01:09 PM   #32
isaac004 OP
Studly Adventurer
 
isaac004's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 676
Day 2, Seeley Lake MT to Whitehall, MT



The morning started out as a crisp foggy morning, quickly clearing up as the sun rose with brisk temperatures in the 40's. We quickly hit the dirt and came across a tree trimming operation. This consists of an excavator type machine, but instead of the usual bucket shovel at the end it has a tree trimming attachment. The first one I passed was no big deal, as I just beeped my horn so he could stop for a moment while I rode by. The second one I passed was much scarier, not because of any close call, but because of what I saw. I passed in the same manor, beeping my horn so the operator could pause while I rode by, but this time I saw the other side of the trimming attachment (which meant no guards). To sum it up, I saw a bunch of high speed spinning blades about 15 feet away at head level. Whew. Anyhow, back on the road....


Flying through these dirt roads in the dense forest on a sunny but cool and crisp morning was truly beautiful and amazing. Tons of small squirrels kept darting across the road, reminding us of all the life in the woods surrounding us. We came across this cool small lake.


I started to experiment with self portraits while riding.


Kozy Korner...what a great name.


The terrain opened up for a bit....


We stopped for brunch in Lincoln Montana, which is where Theodore Kaczynski, better known as the Unabomber, used to live.

Jumping back into the mountains.


There are a lot of these small cabins, decaying slowly in the woods.


The road then followed a nice small creek through the hills.


We then came across Empire Mill, or at least what still remains.


This old mill used to crush ore in one of the mining operations in the area. Judging by the size of some of the tumblers, the boiler, and especially the stone walls still intact, this was pretty large.


Nice teeth.


A bit mangled.


I claim this.


I lost track of how many times we came across cows, and cattle guards.


Zoooom


A nice open meadow.


Another Great Divide mountain biker, one of three in this group.


Just north of Rimini MT, our GPS route led us into this closed road. Seems ok for the mountain bikers to use but we didn't want to risk it.


So we backtracked a few miles into Rimini and talked with a local who was doing some work in his small auto body shop. A very nice person, he was a local to the region and gave us some directions to get around the gate. Part of the mix up was that just south of the area is a superfund site for a mine cleanup project. The local was telling us that in Rimini the government had to clean up 4-6 feet of dirt across the whole town due to mining contamination. A stagecoach used to pass through this area and it was one of the wealthiest areas too, thanks to mining. I also liked his comment about how all the crazy and disturbed people that live in the middle of nowhere Montana are always the ones who aren't from Montana.

We found our way around and went over this earth dam.


Here is the sign from the Basin Creek Mine Superfund Closure.


Cruisin' along.


Butte Montana, once called The Richest Hill on Earth. There is some pretty good history here, all tied back to mining.


One of the main roads through Butte, Harrison Ave, turned out to be the most annoying place I've ever been to. While gassing up and resting, I saw countless motorcycles and open pipe pick up trucks going wide open up and down the road, over and over. One douche bag was even making multiple passes towing his speed boat around. This must mean two things...people are very bored here, and there must be a lot of idiots here too.

Trying to keep the chains in check, a restock of chain lube as well as engine oil was needed so we picked up some supplies at Two Wheelz in Butte. Mostly a dirt shop, the staff was friendly and they had a good stash of vintage dirt bikes on hand to look at. We then tried briefly to find a reasonable motel in Butte but everything was too pricey. Our plan was to continue south and grab the first camp site or cheap motel we found, though we knew finding a motel would be rare since we were headed into the mountains again. It was already 6pm too. The GPS did show one place called the Iron Wheel Guest Ranch in Whitehall Mt, which was only 10 miles or so off the route, so we decided to take a chance.


It turned out to be a great B&B. The owners were really nice and had a dinner option as well. Most of the other guests were there for horse riding and fishing. The husband of the owner couple is a big time hunter and takes people out for guided hunts, and is also a taxidermist. His shop had more skins then I had ever seen anywhere. Here is a bear he was working on for a client.


Name this animal?


I also forgot to add that they have bunnies EVERYWHERE. Turns out they got a few bunnies years ago for their kids, and well, the bunnies did what they knew best. A few get killed every now and then by natural predators, but for the most part there are always 10-20 visible bunnies hopping around the yard at any given time.

isaac004 screwed with this post 08-10-2010 at 11:23 PM
isaac004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 04:42 AM   #33
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Roll Tide Central...
Oddometer: 1,362
Hmm. You know, I do believe we passed you guys in Northern Colorado. I don't recall which day, but one morning passed what I thought was blue and white DR's headed south. Now that I read your report I think it must have been your Dad's XR that I mistook for a second DR.

I was first in line on a blue '08 with a yellow kayak bag on top of the luggage pile, and then it was a white '09 DR followed by a red KLR650.

Sorry we didn't get to speak. I'm enjoying your report.

__________________
'00 R1100RT
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 05:35 AM   #34
pwducati
n00b
 
pwducati's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: S.E. Michigan
Oddometer: 7
Great Report!!

Isaac:
Really enjoying reading your report and reliving the trip!!
This surely was the best trip I have ever done.
Especially doing it with good company such as yourself.

Thanks for taking the trouble to do a Ride Report.

Dad
pwducati is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 08:26 AM   #35
rockjohn
Studly Adventurer
 
rockjohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: VA
Oddometer: 567
Another great father and son adventure.
__________________
Knuckle Dragging Silver Back

Free Your Mind...And Your Ass Will Follow
rockjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 09:55 AM   #36
isaac004 OP
Studly Adventurer
 
isaac004's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 676
Quote:
Originally Posted by basketcase
Hmm. You know, I do believe we passed you guys in Northern Colorado. I don't recall which day, but one morning passed what I thought was blue and white DR's headed south. Now that I read your report I think it must have been your Dad's XR that I mistook for a second DR.

I was first in line on a blue '08 with a yellow kayak bag on top of the luggage pile, and then it was a white '09 DR followed by a red KLR650.
I remember this too...I'm pretty sure it was on 7/13 in the late morning, a bit north of Salida CO. We were coming down the mountain into Salida and you guys were going north up the mountain. The red KLR was trailing a bit further behind. In fact, near the end of our ride while eating lunch in a Subway in Grants NM, a guy on a red KLR from Florida stopped by to talk to us and remembers passing us and said he was with two other DR riders. The KLR guy was loaded up in his truck and said he had to bail for family reasons. Pretty sure he was in your group.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwducati
Isaac:
Really enjoying reading your report and reliving the trip!!
This surely was the best trip I have ever done.
Especially doing it with good company such as yourself.

Thanks for taking the trouble to do a Ride Report.

Dad
I whole-heartily agree too, it was a great trip. The ride report is no problem, so that we can relive this trip whenever we want!
isaac004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 10:15 AM   #37
Sunday Rider
Adventurer Wanabe
 
Sunday Rider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: North of T.Ho., Ontario
Oddometer: 656
What a great adventure and ride report. Trying to get my son to go on a long trip...

Can't think of a better riding partner than a son.

Ya done good taking your Dad with you.

Thanks for posting this.
__________________
'97 Honda ST1100
Sunday Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 12:49 PM   #38
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Roll Tide Central...
Oddometer: 1,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaac004
I remember this too...I'm pretty sure it was on 7/13 in the late morning, a bit north of Salida CO. We were coming down the mountain into Salida and you guys were going north up the mountain. The red KLR was trailing a bit further behind. In fact, near the end of our ride while eating lunch in a Subway in Grants NM, a guy on a red KLR from Florida stopped by to talk to us and remembers passing us and said he was with two other DR riders. The KLR guy was loaded up in his truck and said he had to bail for family reasons. Pretty sure he was in your group.
Yep -- that was us. Not to intrude on your outstanding report, but this shot was taken about 30 minutes before we passed you on the mountain.



BigDaveF (our KLR riding buddy) had trucked his bike out and stashed his truck at Grants at a storage facility. We, on the other hand, rode ours out and back. I'm all but certain that it took years off my life ...

If I ever do anything like that trip again I'll do it Dave's way.

Thanks again for your great report!
__________________
'00 R1100RT
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 02:49 PM   #39
HAULINDAVE
Adventure Rider
 
HAULINDAVE's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: GRASS VALLEY CA
Oddometer: 44
Great ride report

I did a ride (4000 miles) of some of the same place's as you right around the same time , only on a Harley . Started in Grass Valley Ca and went up though Lake Almanor and up though Eagle Lake then north in to Oregon and meet some friends on the Columbia River that I grew up with . They were all riding Harley's , that's why I road the Harley or I would of rather rode one of my dual-sport bikes . Then we did stayed in Seeley Lake MT too , behind the Motor Lodge you stayed at there was a campground .

Hope I added a pic of Lake Almanor with a friend who rode with me the first day on my BMW1100GS and me on my Harley.

Keep it coming !
Attached Images
 
__________________
XR650L01,KTM950SMR07,96BMW1100GS,XL600R83,
2004 Electra Glide Classic,
Been riding for over 45yrs , motocross , endures , road-racing . Always have at least a road bike and dualsport . True Adventure Rider . Always want to explore , see whats on the other side of the mountain or around the bend .

Adventure Rider !
HAULINDAVE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2010, 09:27 PM   #40
isaac004 OP
Studly Adventurer
 
isaac004's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 676
Quote:
Originally Posted by basketcase
Yep -- that was us. Not to intrude on your outstanding report, but this shot was taken about 30 minutes before we passed you on the mountain.

BigDaveF (our KLR riding buddy) had trucked his bike out and stashed his truck at Grants at a storage facility. We, on the other hand, rode ours out and back. I'm all but certain that it took years off my life ...

If I ever do anything like that trip again I'll do it Dave's way.

Thanks again for your great report!
Yep, I definitely remember passing you three.

Riding the bikes out and back to the ride may have taken some more time and wasted some tires, but it also made it feel more adventurous and did keep the costs down (50-60 mpg instead of 15 mpg from a truck) and reduce logistics (don't have to worry about parking the truck and getting back to it).
isaac004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 05:21 AM   #41
basketcase
lifelong reject fixer
 
basketcase's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2004
Location: Roll Tide Central...
Oddometer: 1,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaac004
Yep, I definitely remember passing you three.

Riding the bikes out and back to the ride may have taken some more time and wasted some tires, but it also made it feel more adventurous and did keep the costs down (50-60 mpg instead of 15 mpg from a truck) and reduce logistics (don't have to worry about parking the truck and getting back to it).
Yes, we looked into the various logistical angles and had originally planned to rent a truck for the trip out and back. Then we saw the rental cost would total the price of another bike so we forgot that idea and opted to go 100% adventure!

Actually, it was not unbearable and on the twisties it was a load of fun riding the DR. But as a Gold Wing owner I can also safely say there is no way to construe the DR as a super slab tourer.

Tire wise, we rode out on the stock tires and put on knobbies at Sliver City, NM. Keeping in mind that we got off at Yellowstone and then took in some other places on the way back, the D606's got us up the trail and all the way back home with rubber to spare. Prior to the trip I had read as much as I could about "which knobbies" and there is a lot of speculation around here that gets passed off as wisdom. BigDaveF's front Mefo was toast by the time he got back to Grants. At this moment my 606's have 4,150 miles on them and I think they would go another 1K on the street -- and who knows how much further if all they were rode on was dirt. A DR rider can't go wrong with the D606, IMHO.

Your photography is outstanding! What type of camera were you using?
__________________
'00 R1100RT
------------
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." - Marcus Aurelius
basketcase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 02:46 PM   #42
isaac004 OP
Studly Adventurer
 
isaac004's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 676
My Dad and I went down a similar path, looking at the cost (in time and money) to truck/fly the bikes out, ride, and get them back. Way too much hassle. Plus it's cheating too!

In the end it was much more fun to have ridden them out, especially when Harley guys ask in absolute horror if we really rode those things across the country. I actually enjoyed riding the DR650 on long stretches of tarmac. Only issue is some extra engine vibs when I'm cruising at 70+ mph, but on the backroads and in the twisties it is a lot of fun and handles the curves with ease. This trip has made it my new favorite bike, due to its afford-ability and versatility.

Tires was initially a big battle, but we settled on D606's for a few big points - cheap, long lasting, and the knobs would give us an advantage in the rougher sections. I did consult this as a resource:
http://standoutnet.com/extras/mike/m...ires/#contents

Quote:
Originally Posted by basketcase
Your photography is outstanding! What type of camera were you using?
I was going to wait a bit to go into detail of my camera choice, but now is a good time to cover that subject.

Camera is a Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS1.
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/TS1/TS1A.HTM

It is the "older" version, with the TS2 being newer but the only big difference is the TS2 can handle 10m of submersion, while mine can handle only 3m. Yes, it is water proof, shock proof, and dust proof. After dragging my big Canon 40D on various motorcycling, backpacking, and rock climbing trips, the shutter broke and I said enough with hauling that chunk of glass and magnesium around. So I did a bunch of heavy research on weatherproof point and shoot cameras, bought a few, tested some out, and decided the Panasonic was the best ADV camera on the market. Below is a good reference. I also did buy the new Pentax W90 and wanted to love it, but the photo quality was terrible so I returned it (thank you Amazon.com). I should also add that the TS1/TS2 has a 28mm lens, which is one of the widest lenses you can get in an APS. There are 2 Canon's that have 24mm but they are not waterproof.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/Q209waterproofgroup/

I love my TS1. It has great photo quality, good low light results, and can do 30-60 second exposures under a mode called “stary night”. I really wanted to bring the DSLR to capture some amazing shots but I just didn't want to worry about shock to the camera from the rough roads as well as afternoon thunderstorms....and even if I did, how the hell would I pack it such that I could grab the camera and take a shot in 5 seconds?

I keep my TS1 in my Aerostich pocket with a lanyard around my neck. This allows me to grab the camera, while riding, and take a shot in less than 5 seconds. And if it rains, I keep snapping shots (water drops will collect on the lens though and make the picture look funny). Speed of accessibility is the most important part of picture taking, and this setup resulted in well over 1000 photos in 3 weeks of riding.


I also did take a few photos with my HTC Incredible, but that was so I could send updates from the road.

isaac004 screwed with this post 08-10-2010 at 02:53 PM
isaac004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 03:14 PM   #43
pyrate
Walking the plank
 
pyrate's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: SoCal
Oddometer: 1,161
Shutter lag?

How is the shutter lag? I have an Olympus Tough 6000 which I miss a fair amount of shots because of the lag. I have it mounted on the handlebars using a RAM mount and have the camera on and simply put - it takes too long to shoot the picture. It also has a TAPTAP feature that is absolute annoying. It is going to get TAPTAP'd with a hammer soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by isaac004

Camera is a Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS1.
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/TS1/TS1A.HTM

It is the "older" version, with the TS2 being newer but the only big difference is the TS2 can handle 10m of submersion, while mine can handle only 3m. Yes, it is water proof, shock proof, and dust proof. After dragging my big Canon 40D on various motorcycling, backpacking, and rock climbing trips, the shutter broke and I said enough with hauling that chunk of glass and magnesium around. So I did a bunch of heavy research on weatherproof point and shoot cameras, bought a few, tested some out, and decided the Panasonic was the best ADV camera on the market. Below is a good reference. I also did buy the new Pentax W90 and wanted to love it, but the photo quality was terrible so I returned it (thank you Amazon.com). I should also add that the TS1/TS2 has a 28mm lens, which is one of the widest lenses you can get in an APS. There are 2 Canon's that have 24mm but they are not waterproof.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/Q209waterproofgroup/

I love my TS1. It has great photo quality, good low light results, and can do 30-60 second exposures under a mode called “stary night”. I really wanted to bring the DSLR to capture some amazing shots but I just didn't want to worry about shock to the camera from the rough roads as well as afternoon thunderstorms....and even if I did, how the hell would I pack it such that I could grab the camera and take a shot in 5 seconds?

I keep my TS1 in my Aerostich pocket with a lanyard around my neck. This allows me to grab the camera, while riding, and take a shot in less than 5 seconds. And if it rains, I keep snapping shots (water drops will collect on the lens though and make the picture look funny). Speed of accessibility is the most important part of picture taking, and this setup resulted in well over 1000 photos in 3 weeks of riding.


I also did take a few photos with my HTC Incredible, but that was so I could send updates from the road.
__________________
"but why is all the rum gone?"


pyrate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 03:18 PM   #44
isaac004 OP
Studly Adventurer
 
isaac004's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 676
Quote:
Originally Posted by pyrate
How is the shutter lag? I have an Olympus Tough 6000 which I miss a fair amount of shots because of the lag. I have it mounted on the handlebars using a RAM mount and have the camera on and simply put - it takes too long to shoot the picture. It also has a TAPTAP feature that is absolute annoying. It is going to get TAPTAP'd with a hammer soon.
To turn it on requires holding the power button for 1 second, but the lag to power up is just 1-2 seconds. To take a photo, the AF can usually lock onto an object and be ready to snap in 0.5-1.5 seconds. In good lighting, you can almost always take a photo in less then 1 second from focus to picture....in dark situations, it can take 1-1.5 seconds to find a focus point.

There are lots of cameras with better response, but this one can get covered in sand, mud, and rinsed off in water, which sold me.
isaac004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2010, 04:33 PM   #45
pyrate
Walking the plank
 
pyrate's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: SoCal
Oddometer: 1,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaac004
To turn it on requires holding the power button for 1 second, but the lag to power up is just 1-2 seconds. To take a photo, the AF can usually lock onto an object and be ready to snap in 0.5-1.5 seconds. In good lighting, you can almost always take a photo in less then 1 second from focus to picture....in dark situations, it can take 1-1.5 seconds to find a focus point.

There are lots of cameras with better response, but this one can get covered in sand, mud, and rinsed off in water, which sold me.
Better than mine. Can you zoom while shooting video? The Olympus won't.

Thanks! Might check this one out when it is time to check out how "tough" the Olympus is.
__________________
"but why is all the rum gone?"


pyrate is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014