ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Day Trippin'
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-07-2010, 05:35 PM   #1
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Chasing Stonewall Jackson - ancient mariners on the loose again

Last year the ancient mariners took a trip to follow the route of John Wilkes Booth. That turned out to be a fun ride so we decided to pick another interesting Civil War participant and follow (sort of) his footsteps. Stonewall Jackson seemed to fit the bill.
The bikes




My F800GS and Jack's F658GS

Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson is probably the most well-known Confederate commander after General Robert E. Lee. He graduated from West Point in 1842. Among his classmates were the Confederate General James Longstreet and the Union General Abner Doubleday (reputed inventor of baseball). He fought in the Mexican War where received two battlefield promotions. In 1851 he resigned from the Army to accepted a teaching position at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) in Lexington VA.







Jackson purchased the only house he ever owned while in Lexington. Built in 1801, the brick town house at 8 East Washington Street was purchased by Jackson in 1859. He lived in it for two years before being called to serve in the Confederacy. Jackson never returned to his home.






In 1861, as the American Civil War broke out, Jackson became a drill master for some of the many new recruits in the Confederate Army. On April 27, 1861, Virginia Governor John Letcher ordered Colonel Jackson to take command at Harpers Ferry, where he would assemble and command a brigade consisting of the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 27th, and 33rd Virginia Infantry regiments.
Confederate troops under Jackson's command entered Martinsburg on June 20 and set about dismantling the railroad. In addition to the tracks, the Confederates destroyed the round house, various railroad buildings, fifty-six locomotives, and at least 305 cars. Thirteen locomotives were spared by Jackson and seized for use by the Confederacy. They were shipped overland to Strasburg. Eventually another 80 rail cars were moved south.
__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride


lakota screwed with this post 08-07-2010 at 06:53 PM
lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 05:38 PM   #2
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Chasing Stonewall Jackson - First Manassas

Jackson rose to prominence and earned his nickname at the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run) on July 21, 1861. As the Confederate lines began to crumble under heavy Union assault, Jackson's brigade provided crucial reinforcements on Henry House Hill, demonstrating the discipline he instilled in his men. Brig. Gen. Barnard Elliott Bee, Jr., exhorted his own troops to re-form by shouting, "There is Jackson standing like a stone wall. Let us determine to die here, and we will conquer. Rally behind the Virginians!" There is some controversy over Bee's statement and intent, which could not be clarified because he was killed almost immediately after speaking and none of his subordinate officers wrote reports of the battle. Major Burnett Rhett, chief of staff to General Joseph E. Johnston, claimed that Bee was angry at Jackson's failure to come immediately to the relief of Bee's and Bartow's brigades while they were under heavy pressure. Those who subscribe to this opinion believe that Bee's statement was meant to be pejorative: "Look at Jackson standing there like a damned stone wall!"
Manassas Battlefield Visitors Center





Henry Hill House - the centerpoint of the battle



Looking back at Jackson's line from Bee's position


Bee monument at the place where he was shot


Looking in the direction of the Union advance


Line of Confederate retreat



Having walked the battle field I can see how one could come to the conclusion that Bee was not happy with Jackson.
Jackson monument at Manassas Battlefield



Regardless of the controversy and the delay in relieving Bee, Jackson's brigade, which would henceforth be known as the Stonewall Brigade, stopped the Union assault and suffered more casualties than any other Southern brigade that day. After the battle, Jackson was promoted to major general and given command of the Valley District, with headquarters in Winchester
__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride


lakota screwed with this post 08-07-2010 at 05:50 PM
lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 05:48 PM   #3
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Chasing Stonewall Jackson - Valley Campaign

The Valley Campaign

The campaign started with a tactical defeat at Kernstown on March 23, 1861.
Battlefield



May 8 1862 Battle of McDowell

Union troops advanced form this direction





May 23 1862 Battle of Front Royal
Unfortunately this battlefield has become downtown Front Royal


May 25 1862 First Battle of Winchester
Like Front Royal this battlefield is no more




June 8 Battle of Cross Keys

Battlefield


June 9 Battle of Port Republic






Port Republic was the last battle of the Valley Campaign


__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 06:08 PM   #4
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Chasing Stonewall Jackson - Seven Days Battles

Jackson possessed the attributes to succeed against his poorly coordinated and sometimes timid opponents: a combination of great audacity, excellent knowledge and shrewd use of the terrain, and the ability to inspire his troops to great feats of marching and fighting. Jackson's 17,000 men marched 646 miles (1,040 km) in 48 days and won several minor battles as they successfully engaged 52,00 Union soldiers, preventing them from reinforcing the offensive against Richmond
After the Valley Campaign ended in mid-June, Jackson and his troops were called to join Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia in defense of Richmond. By utilizing a railroad tunnel under the Blue Ridge Mountains ...

(This is the new tunnel through the Blue Ridge - try as we might we could not find the original tunnel and wasted an hour in the search.)

...and then transporting troops to Hanover on the Virginia Central Railroad, Jackson and his forces made a surprise appearance in front of McClellan at Mechanicsville.
June 26 Battle of Beaver Dam Creek (Mechanicsville)




The bridge was not there then.


June 27 Battle of Gaines Mill





This was the first battle of the war where both sides used observation balloons.
June 30 Battle of White Oak Swamp





A really new bridge






July 1 Battle of Malvern Hill
on the way to Malvern Hill we saw a detour sign which we ignored and ended up going through 5 sets of barricades like this. Dropped my bike twice by not paying attention




The battlefield



__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 06:37 PM   #5
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Chasing Stonewall Jackson - the rest of 1862

Jackson's troops served well under Lee in this series of, but Jackson's own performance in those battles is generally considered to be poor. He arrived late at Mechanicsville and inexplicably ordered his men to bivouac for the night within clear earshot of the battle. He was late and disoriented at Gaines Mill. At White Oak Swamp he failed to employ fording places to cross White Oak Swamp Creek, attempting for hours to rebuild a bridge, which limited his involvement to an ineffectual artillery duel and a missed opportunity. At Malvern Hill Jackson participated in the futile, piecemeal frontal assaults against entrenched Union infantry and massed artillery, and suffered heavy casualties (but this was a problem for all of Lee's army in that ill-considered battle). The reasons for Jackson's sluggish and poorly-coordinated actions during the Seven Days are disputed, although a severe lack of sleep after the grueling march and railroad trip from the Shenandoah Valley was probably a significant factor. Both Jackson and his troops were completely exhausted.
This marked the end of the Peninsula Campaign by the Union and Lee felt secure enough to move his forces north. Jackson marched to Gordonsville VA and on August 9 fought Gen Pope in the Battle of Cedar Mountain.



Jackson then moved north and participated in Second Manassas, which was fought on virtually the same ground as First Manassas


When Lee decided to invade the North in the Maryland Campaign, Jackson took Harpers Ferry, then hastened to join the rest of the army at Sharpsburg MD, where they fought McClellan in the Battle of Antietam on September 17. Antietam was primarily a defensive battle fought against superior odds, although McClellan failed to exploit his advantage. Jackson's men bore the brunt of the initial attacks on the northern end of the battlefield. The Confederate forces held their position, but the battle was extremely bloody for both sides. It was the bloodiest single day battle in US history. Lee withdrew back across the Potomac River, ending the invasion. Jackson was promoted to lieutenant general. On October 10 his command was redesignated the Second Corps.

Before the armies camped for winter, Jackson's Second Corps held off a strong Union assault against the right flank of the Confederate line at the Battle of Fredericksburg, in what became a decisive Confederate victory.

Jackson's line was along here

Jackson watched the battle from here


The Union Army advanced out there until turned back



__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 06:50 PM   #6
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Chasing Stonewall Jackson - the end of Jackson

The spring of 1863 found the opposing armies facing off near Chancellorsville VA . Jackson and his entire corps were sent on an aggressive flanking maneuver to the right of the Union lines. This flanking movement would be one of the most successful and dramatic of the war. The Confederates marched silently until they were merely several hundred feet from the Union position, then released a bloodthirsty cry and full charge. Many of the Federals were captured without a shot fired, the rest were driven into a full rout. Jackson pursued relentlessly back toward the center of the Federal line until dusk.



The attack launched from here




Jackson
's mistake came when he was scouting ahead of his corps along the Orange Plank Road that night. Having won a huge victory that day, Jackson wanted to press his advantage. He rode out to determine the feasibility of a night attack by the light of the full moon, and, upon his return, he and his staff were incorrectly identified as Union cavalry by men of the Second Corps, who hit him with friendly fire.
Jackson was shot here





It is surmised he was taken from his horse here





His arm was amputated and buried here









The wound itself was not life-threatening, but Jackson contracted pneumonia after his arm was amputated, and he died on May 10. His death was a devastating loss for the Confederacy. Some historians and participants attribute the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg two months later to Jackson's death.


Jackson died here









Jackson himself is buried in the Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery in Lexington.
First internment spot


Current gravesite




Military historians consider Jackson to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in United StatesChancellorsville are studied worldwide even today as examples of innovative and bold leadership. history. His Valley Campaign and his envelopment of the Union Army right wing at
__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2010, 07:21 PM   #7
Michaelfish
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Oddometer: 216
Thumb Very cool!

Awe inspiring!

Thanks!.... from those of us who will probably never be able to see this.

I am humbled.
__________________
Michaelfish
1999 XR650L
2003 Goldwing
Ridgecrest, Kahliffoanya
Michaelfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 04:19 AM   #8
JaxObsessed
RushMoran....... :D
 
JaxObsessed's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: From Alabama to Newfoundland it's all Appalachian
Oddometer: 10,268
Great job Lakota!
I never knew what a warrior he was. Thanks for another history lesson

The Ancient Mariners rock!
__________________
ADVers are out of control and that's their charm, they don't line up, they don't have standards they follow, each and every one does their own thing. They know how to ride free - Bugsister.
JaxObsessed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 05:25 AM   #9
Dorito
Dreamer and Doer
 
Dorito's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Maryland
Oddometer: 4,758
Horse Triva

Quote:
Originally Posted by lakota



A statue of a soldier on a horse should tell you how a solider died.

Horse standing on all four legs--natural death
Horse on three legs--died of wounds from battle
Horse on two legs (rearing up) --died in battle
Dorito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 06:37 AM   #10
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
unfortunately this one is incorrect on that point
__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 07:42 AM   #11
H14
I Gotta Go!
 
H14's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Shenandoah Valley
Oddometer: 4,176
Nice report. I had the same idea last year but spent most of it mending bones instead of riding. James I. Robertson Jr. wrote an excellent biography on the life of Jackson. If you want to know more about the man this is the best book I have read on him.

BTW is this the tunnel you were looking for? It was a tagged in the Valley Dual Sport Tag game earlier this year.
__________________
http://www.crazyfoxcoffee.com/ Discount code ADV
I wish life was simple and I was complicated, somehow I've managed to get it backwards.
H14 and Campcook wandering aimlessly 2-up
2012 Riding the Continental Divide
H14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 08:05 AM   #12
ccrat
Dumb as a box of hair
 
ccrat's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Airstrip One, Oceania
Oddometer: 931
Excellent report.
ccrat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 01:01 PM   #13
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
Is that the east or west side? we were looking for the east side.


Quote:
Originally Posted by h14xl

BTW is this the tunnel you were looking for? It was a tagged in the Valley Dual Sport Tag game earlier this year.
__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 05:05 PM   #14
MGB
ex. BmwDuc
 
MGB's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Hampton and Forks of Buffalo, VA
Oddometer: 1,842
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakota
unfortunately this one is incorrect on that point
I think it is since he died from pneumonia (not from his wounds or in battle). Nevertheless, history is always interesting - his VMI students did not like him to the point of throwing bricks out barracks windows at him.

Marc
VMI '81
__________________
1. "The more one gets to know of men, the more one values dogs" Anonymous
2. Life is not a dress rehearsal.
MGB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2010, 05:10 PM   #15
lakota OP
Geeser
 
lakota's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Annapolis MD
Oddometer: 2,842
thanks for that tidbit
everything adds to the big picture

Marty
USNA '67
__________________
IBA #42016

my ride reports

follow my ride

lakota is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014