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Old 05-05-2012, 02:13 PM   #136
bmweuro
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Measure the inside step on the upper triple clamp and use that measurement to determine how much to cut off of the headlight ears.
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:15 PM   #137
backdrifter OP
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Thanks, will do!

I've got a nasty couple of weeks of travel coming up for work, but I put in an email for my next parts order consisting of:

Rubber fork boots, driveshaft bolts, driveshaft washers, swingarm gasket, goot peg rubbers, rear spoke set, front spoke set, timing chain, piston rings, fuel filters, swing arm oil seals, crossover pipe clamps, complete stainless steel header and crossover pipe set, upper and lower headlight bracket rubbers, fuel line, clutch plate, stainless front and rear axles, and front brake cable.

Yeah, the wallet is going to be a bit lighter, but I'll have little to no more excuses holding me back once I get home from traveling!
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:43 PM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KLRUSERIOUS? View Post
[INSERT FOX WHISTLE HERE]

Man that old girl looks mighty fine. Excellent work on the bike and true to your nature as a skilled craftsman the photography and post overall, is top notch and well received sir....carry on!
First of all, I need to take a moment to thank you for your support, KLRUSERIOUS! You've been the biggest contributor to this thread and I appreciate it. There have been times that I've been lying in bed thinking, "I'd really better start making some progress on the bike, or KLRUSERIOUS will be disappointed!"

So, thanks!

OK, onward...

I got the rims and hubs back from the powder coater. I went with gloss black on the rims - a far cry from original or stock, but I think it's a decision I'm going to be happy with. I had the wheel hubs and final drive assembly blasted clean and then powder coated with a matte clear coat. It turned out nice, but it doesn't look as natural as I was hoping for. The photos make it look better than I think it looks in person. I was hoping for something that would look like clean, raw aluminum. I think it's a bit too dark grey to look natural, but it still looks good and once they're mounted, I think it will be harder to notice. The main purpose of coating the wheels was to keep them clean. I don't mind occasionally having to clean and scrub the aluminum bits that are easily within reach, like the cylinders and the rest of the engine, but I do NOT want to be disassembling the wheels every few years to clean out the ribs in the wheel hubs (and yes, I am anal enough that I would probably do that)....

So, here are the photos. I apologize for the poor quality, all I had on me at the time was my phone.











You can see what I mean about the color being a bit too grey better on these parts:



I took the wheels/hubs straight to a local BMW shop and asked them to order some stainless spokes and reassemble the wheels. That should take about two weeks total.

While I was there, I also had them reinstall the driveshaft in the swingarm - so now I can start reassembling the final drive assembly, swingarm, shocks, etc.



More soon - I'm on a roll now!
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"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living."
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166

backdrifter screwed with this post 05-09-2012 at 01:18 PM
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:53 PM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backdrifter View Post

While I was there, I also had them reinstall the driveshaft in the swingarm - so now I can start reassembling the final drive assembly, swingarm, shocks, etc.

More soon - I'm on a roll now!
No backdrifter, you are the one that deserves all the thanks and credit on this one man. I mean, I have read a ton of these rebuild threads and I am rebuilding two RZ350s of my own right now, but I must say that I am rather impressed by not only your attention to fine detail sir, but also your ability to pull off restoring parts the way you do so well.......So sleep tight bud, I am more than impressed by your efforts and although I didn't know him, I am sure Jim Adams would be proud to call you a son in law honoring his memory like this.

But don't let those words deter you from gettin' er done! Because I cannot WAIT to see the black beauty in one magnificent piece!

UBER EXCELLENT WORK!!!

Make sure you take pics of the look on the faces of Jim's relatives when they see the bike all done
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Old 05-11-2012, 12:35 PM   #140
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Thanks again for the kind words, they are truly appreciated! If you ever make it to the St. Louis area, I owe you a few beers!

I took a few hours away from the office this morning to get some more stuff done. I really wanted to get the swing arm and shocks mounted. I have some more time tomorrow morning that I want to devote to opening up the engine and inspecting the clutch to determine what parts I need to order.

So, I dug out the swing arm parts.



Dirty, dirty, dirty! This will never do!



Cleaned everything up and went to grab the new swing arm bearings. The old "stick 'em in the freezer to shrink them and make installation easier" trick.



One thing I've learned in this project is that bearing races and I do not get along. The first one went in really smoothly though, so I thought maybe this was a new trend.

In and seated:



Slathered up the bearing with Bel Ray:



Oil seal and sleeve installed and ready to go. One down, one to go. This is too easy!



Then I managed to get the other one stuck in the bore. Damn!



It doesn't look like much, but getting it straightened out again added 10 minutes to my day's work! Eventually I got it tapped in though, and installed the rest of the parts like the other side.

Centering/tightening the swing arm into place was interesting. I got it pretty good, but the pins didn't seem very tight. There was no play in the swing arm motion at all, and everything else seemed OK, so I went ahead and tightened the retainer nuts to spec. I'll go over all the set-up torques and values again before riding her anyway.

Onto some fun stuff:



Shiny!



One side mounted:





And then both:





And then the final drive, though it's only mocked up right now because I need a new gasket.







Here you can see the darker grey color of the final drive. I'm not sure why it turned out a different color than the hubs. Oh well - it doesn't quite look natural, but it will be much easier to keep clean.



Closed up shop and let the old girl sleep for another day. It won't be long until she's sleeping much less than she has been over the last 5 years!



Hopefully more tomorrow....
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"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living."
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-12-2012, 04:56 AM   #141
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Beautiful restoration job. Very methodical with your approach as well, which is good to see.

I read this thread and can't help thinking of another thread on another forum, related to BMW K-bikes, that you might have interest in perusing:

85 K100 restoration

Even though it's a different BMW motorcycle model than the one you're restoring, the issues Oldgoat encounters and solves will be useful to your rebuild. The product recommendations he has are particularly good.

Best of luck. Jim Adams would be extremely proud of what you're doing.
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Old 05-12-2012, 05:50 AM   #142
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St. Louis

Sounds like a ride plan! And seeing as how I owe you a few beers for such a fine ride report, it looks like it'll be a pleasant visit. Then we can sit and sip brews while we stare at your bike for a few hours.

Wow...just freakin wow!
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Old 05-14-2012, 09:16 AM   #143
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rbm: Thanks so much for sharing the link, I'll have to check that out!

KLRUSERIOUS: Just let me know when you're headed this way!

I wasn't overly productive this weekend, but I did get what needed to be done done. I'm going to be out traveling all week again, and I wanted to confirm what I need in regards to the clutch and timing chain parts and get them ordered before I left. So, out to the garage I went early Saturday morning to take a look-see.

Removed the transmission. Hard to see here, but the shafts and splines all look good:







I wanted to dig deeper, but I wasn't able to get the bolts off. I don't have an impact wrench, so I'll have to buy or borrow one. In addition, I didn't have the three 2", 8mm bolts needed to properly release the diaphragm spring tension, so I couldn't go much farther. I decided everything I saw was clean enough that I would take a leap of faith and only order a new friction plate and diaphragm spring. I'd really be surprised if it needs a new pressure ring or pressure plate.

OK, onto the front cover. I had an issue with stripping out all three (!) of the bolts holding the generator on and thought I wasn't going to get much farther, but I was able to get them out.





Finally off:



Then off came the rotor:



And finally a view inside:



Tensioner looks good:



And honestly, so did the chain on first inspection:





But looking a little closer you can see where the chain was making contact with the casing:





Better to be safe than sorry, so I went ahead and ordered a new chain, tensioner, and tensioning spring. It's only money, right?!?

So I'm sending another $1,200 order into BMW Hucky today (who has been fantastic, by the way). Hopefully the parts should be here by mid next week so I can get a lot done next weekend.

I also ordered a new set of Bridgestone Battlax BT45 tires which should be here next week.
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"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living."
-Thich Nhat Hanh

1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-20-2012, 04:39 AM   #144
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'atta boy! No sense cutting corners now.

CHUG! CHUG! CHUG! CHUG!!!
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Old 05-20-2012, 12:53 PM   #145
enzorover
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That chain is clearly worn out but it looks like there was a LOT of chain slap from all the slack...slack that the tensioner should have been able to take up... Definitely take a close look at it when you install the new chain.


Looks fantastic! Keep up the great work!!
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Old 05-21-2012, 06:34 AM   #146
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This is art. That frame looks superb.
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Old 05-21-2012, 02:09 PM   #147
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Thanks to all for the kind words!

Well, nothing new yet. I did receive the tires in the mail late last week. Maybe I'll go out and take some photos of those, though not overly exciting.

Unfortunately, BWM Hucky has not received the cashier's check that I mailed last Monday yet. I'm starting to get worried, but the bank said they've had some problems with the local mail lately and to give it another week before going to request a stop payment and requesting a new one be issued. There should be no way that I'm out the $1,200 that I sent, but it's the lost time that bothers me. This was going to be a good week to get a few things done.

I also want to dig into the clutch and the timing chain while it is all fresh in my mind. I don't want enough time to pass that I forget how each part went on, and what went where, etc. Yes, I have a manual, but it's a lot easier just remembering how it all went. Oh well, it's out of my control!

On a positive note, all of the chrome bits are scheduled to be done this Friday, and I may get my shiny wheels and hubs back complete with shiny new stainless spokes this week as well.

Here's to hoping!
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"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living."
-Thich Nhat Hanh

1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166

backdrifter screwed with this post 05-21-2012 at 02:50 PM
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Old 05-22-2012, 03:10 PM   #148
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Inspiring

Backdrifter,

Truly amazing work. I have to say that after reading your entire post (so far) that I am moved to begin my own restoration of my 73 SWB R60/5 Toaster. It has been mostly a garage queen for the past many years as my marriage, parenting, and job ended my solo pursuit of the twisties. With one kid done with college and the other on the way, I now have the time to begin work on the old gal. I have another ride (82 R100RT hack rig) that I and the GF use, so I am not entirely out of the game while I work on the /5.

Just wanted to drop a line and say thanks for sharing and I will continue to follow your journey and perhaps post my own.

D.
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Old 05-23-2012, 06:26 AM   #149
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Thanks for sharing!

I would definitely give doing a build thread some thought. The only downside I can think of is the time it takes to keep it up. I find it therapeutic though, and don't mind one bit. The plusses are that you'll always have a record of what you did, you'll have lots of photos to go back and reference when you have questions, and you'll have the support and camaraderie of many fellow forum members!

It sounds funny to hear that you've found my build inspirational. If I can do something like this, anyone can! Quite honestly, I wasn't sure if I had gotten myself in over my head (actually, I'm still not sure) once I started tearing the bike apart. But, you take it piece by piece and find that you're capable of a lot more than you thought. It still doesn't seem to me like I've done a lot, until I start listing everything that I've done to the bike (and look at all my receipts!).

I hope you do decide to do a build diary - I'd love to follow along and root for you!

Now the important question: How do you like your '73 R60/5? As someone who's never ridden an R60/5, or any airhead for that matter, the suspense is killing me. I seriously have weekly dreams about the first ride. I can't wait....
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"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living."
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:00 AM   #150
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Riding 73 R60/5

Backdrifter,

Way back when, I rode several borrowed bikes. From 50cc Harleys and Hondas, to 750 Norton Commandos, and one Norton Atlas. The first real bike I bought was an early 750 Honda (72) before they tuned them down. That bike was a real monster. It was happiest at about 85-90 which was too fast for me. Plus, it was difficult for a shade tree mechanic to tune and maintain. So I sold it and started looking for a smaller, slower, and simpler ride. It took a while because when I had the money, I had no prospects. When I found a potential bike, I had no money. And living in NE Minnesota where the riding season is short (unless you like snow and ice) the available stock was thin.

I finally found my R60 from a just married farm lad whose missus declared motorcycles as inappropriate for their lifestyle. His loss, my gain.

I first took off the bolt on windshield and started riding. Over the years, I covered a lot of miles with minimal maintenance on the bike other than oil changes and valve setting. The R60 is one of the smoothest of the R bikes when properly tuned. It is also very nimble for such a rugged machine. It never broke down on me and it put up with several instances of poor judgement on my part that required replacement of handlebars, headlight buckets and saddle bag mounts. No other bike that I know of could have survived a 60 mph get off while on the trans-Canadian highway north of Lake Superior, and still run, much less drive me 40 miles into Sault Saint Marie where a talented Czeck mechanic patch it up well enough for me to finish my ride.

I rode with friends who all had newer, sportier, bikes in the twisties and was able to stick with them in the corners, but lost them on the straights. I will offer one caveat, mind your speed coming into the corners and anywhere where stopping suddenly might be called for. The weak spot on the R60 are the drum brakes. If you ride prudently and keep your eyes open, they will work fine, but if you want to ride hard and dump speed quickly, then consider a disk upgrade on the front.

The R60 is happiest ridden solo. Even fully loaded for trips lasting months, the R60 will pull you up and into the mountains without complaint. It will cruise all day in triple digit temps across the plains effortlessly. It is a little under powered for two-up touring however.

So, that's about it from me. The hack rig is my ride now when I want to go with the GF. But I miss the solo aspect of riding. I was never much for group rides or city commuting. I loved the back roads with no clear game plan. Just a vague idea of where I was heading.

Oh, another thought. If you are going to keep the toaster tank, and plan on touring, you'll be stopping often for gas. I mounted a larger tank soon after acquiring the bike, but will be putting the toaster back on for the rebuild. If long tours are part of your plan, you may want to have a bigger tank to swap with the toaster for those trips.

Tata.
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