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Old 05-01-2012, 11:55 AM   #121
KLRUSERIOUS?
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:09 PM   #122
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Great job so far....looking forward to the rest oh.
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:55 PM   #123
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Hi Backdrifter,

I just found this post for the first time today while looking over airhead threads as I recently bought my first airhead.
Your restoration you are doing in memory of Jim Adams has really moved me. I did almost the exact same thing a few years ago to my father's BMW that he left me as a tribute and a way to bond with my recently deceased father. It was the best therapy I could ever have chosen, and your bike is strikingly similar down to the paint jobs! (Although mine was the generation right before your slash 5)
That restoration I did changed my entire life, as it got me into motorcycles and now I am starting my next project turning an R100RT into a cafe racer.
Anyway, you are doing a great job and I really appreciate how you are sharing your restoration here.
Papa would indeed be proud, and his entire family will certainly be proud when you are finished.

/bill

(google "a BMW Story"... that's me)
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Old 05-03-2012, 07:39 AM   #124
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Thanks to all for the encouragement - it does make a positive difference! :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by bill42 View Post
Hi Backdrifter,

I just found this post for the first time today while looking over airhead threads as I recently bought my first airhead.
Your restoration you are doing in memory of Jim Adams has really moved me. I did almost the exact same thing a few years ago to my father's BMW that he left me as a tribute and a way to bond with my recently deceased father. It was the best therapy I could ever have chosen, and your bike is strikingly similar down to the paint jobs! (Although mine was the generation right before your slash 5)
That restoration I did changed my entire life, as it got me into motorcycles and now I am starting my next project turning an R100RT into a cafe racer.
Anyway, you are doing a great job and I really appreciate how you are sharing your restoration here.
Papa would indeed be proud, and his entire family will certainly be proud when you are finished.

/bill

(google "a BMW Story"... that's me)
Hi /bill,

Thanks for your very kind post! I know your video well - I've watched it MANY times, and it is just amazing! It brought tears to my eyes the first time I saw it. And the bike is just gorgeous, you did a spectacular job! I'll be ecstatic if mine turns out half as good as yours did! What a cool way to honor your father. I'm glad that your restoration was life changing, and I appreciate the encouragement. Every now and then I get caught up on the small details - the time and money I'm investing, the fact that it has taken so much longer than I anticipated. I need to stay focused on the big picture and keep moving.

Papa is buried up in the Chicago area, and the first road trip I have planned for the bike is a ride up there to "show" him the bike. It will be a meaningful, and as you mentioned, therapeutic, ride!

Thanks again for your comments!

Ben
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:25 AM   #125
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I figured you probably had seen my youtube slideshow... Glad you found it inspiring. From your photos, your restoration is going to be just as clean as mine was. I didn't really do anything special except a typical cosmetic restoration and a new clutch and rebuilt heads and shocks. One day I will rebuild the engine and transmission but if it ain't broke, don't fix it!

You are lucky like I am to have inherited a motorcycle from someone close to you. It really turns the bike into so much more than a machine. I ride friend's crazy fast streetfighters, and I rode a new GS all over the Alps, but I can never wait to get back on my Dad's little old, low powered R50.

Don't worry about the money. If it helps, I think I probably spent maybe 15 grand on mine, but the truth is I stopped counting at around 8 grand because it started worrying me just like it worries you. And yeah, I had to wait sometimes to save up some more money to buy the big pieces I needed, and I kind of emptied my savings account.
But the thing about money is, it all comes back eventually, and I don't even know I spent what I did now, 2 years later.
The bike you will have forever though. In my case, it was the best investment I ever made.

Keep up the good work!
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Old 05-03-2012, 09:53 AM   #126
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Thanks again! Yes, I do believe your project exceeded mine in both scope and cost! I've had the heads rebuilt and the cylinders cleaned up. I'm going to replace piston rings, the timing chain and the rear main seal. Otherwise, mechanically she's looked pretty good so far (though I always seem to find something new that requires attention as I dig farther in). I'm hoping to stay under the $7,000 mark for the whole process, but like you, I've stopped counting. The way I figure it, I got the bike for free, and like you pointed out, a bike with sentimental value is worth far more (to me) than one without.

I'm going to try to take all the bits that need to be rechromed into a local shop today. That should just about complete the cosmetic portion of the rebuild.

Thanks again!

PS: By the way, did you ever post that video here on Advrider? If not, you really should - this crowd would absolutely eat it up!
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-03-2012, 10:05 AM   #127
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I never did actually post my video link here but I believe others may have. By now it seems that everyone who rides a motorcycle has seen it, which never ceases to amaze me.
I too cleaned up my cylinders with a dingleberry brush. (Gotta hate those dingleberries stuck in your engine!) and installed new rings and new seals- All the seals I could get to that is. I didn't rechrome anything, choosing to buy stainless steel repro parts instead hoping they will outlast chrome. A lot of my money went into an expensive paint job with lots of body work. You body and the tins are in better shape which will save $$. I also had a bidding war on a headlight bucket with rebuilt speed and wound up paying over $700 for it! Not sure if it was worth it but in terms of time and money it probably was.
I still have a bunch of left over parts that I can probably sell for $800 on ebay if I ever get around to it. Your R60 is a great little bike. Still pretty small, and about the same weight as my older bike yet more powerful with better handling. What a blast you are going to have. Get ready for all sorts of strangers at stop lights asking you "What kind of bike is that?"
And then... "I didn't know BMW made motorcycles!"
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:12 PM   #128
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Yeah, I'm really looking forward to hearing this thing run. I think I'll probably cry the first time it idles. I've only heard it run once or twice, and I had to use starter fluid and rev it pretty high to get it going at all. That was at least a year ago when I decided a full motor out of frame resto was necessary.

Overall I've been very lucky - almost all of the original parts have been salvageable and have actually looked really good. I had the left cylinder/head that had some unexplained pitting, probably from an unattended head leak, but other than that, it's been surprisingly clean. It didn't require any body work, just paint.

I really like the idea of stainless replacements, but I decided to rechrome most parts just because my ultimate goal is to keep as much components the same ones as when Papa rode it as possible. So, I dropped the tank plates, headlight ring, both front fender braces, and the center stand grab handle off at the plater today. No big deal, just $175 less in my bank account. As you said, it's only money!
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:31 PM   #129
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Well that is a faithful restoration for sure then. Can you believe the toaster tanks were very unpopular? Your bike has a great look to it. Although you can always update it to suit your riding style a bit. For instance you dropped the fairing. You could take that idea further if you wanted and put some lower euro bars and lower mirrors to tighten up the look a bit. Heck I totally cjanged the look of my dad's bike and put not just euro bars but a solo seat too. I upgraded various electronic parts too to modern more reliable components as well. The main point is that it is still the same basic bike. I agree though that you should stick with whatever you can that came with the bike. I made some choices that I felt would prolong the time before the next restoration is needed. I actually plan on leaving the bike to my children, who happen to be girls. I'll make riders out of them yet!
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:47 PM   #130
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Ha, we have a lot in common then. My only child (so far) is a 3 year old daughter. She loves the bike already though. Every time we walk past it in the garage she says, "daddy, are we going to ride on that together some day"? I always tell her "of course", though her mother would kill me if she heard me saying that!

My resto will not be a true/faithful/absolutely stock kind. I'm not an originality nazi, I just want to keep as much of it as possible like it was when Papa rode it. I already have a set of Euro low bars. I didn't feel bad about that because the stock bars were not salvageable. I'm also varying from stock in other ways - like you said, I'm going with more low-profile mirrors. I also decided to powder coat the rims black. I wanted to keep the original rims, but they had some wear and tear that lead me to believe that they wouldn't polish up well (some cuts were too deep), so I decided to powder coat them instead. I'm going to leave the turn signals completely off (they're not required in IL), and put a more sleek taillight on. Overall, it will be Papa's bike with a bit of my style added to it!

Yeah, it's interesting that the toasters were not well received, and now are looked at as classics. Truth be told, I think I like the non-toaster tanks more, but I can certainly appreciate the toaster tank, and it's what my bike came with, so it's what will stay on it.
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-03-2012, 03:10 PM   #131
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I'd leave that rusty nut right where it is, as-is. A reminder of the patina of the bike when it arrived.
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Old 05-03-2012, 11:21 PM   #132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by limeymike View Post
I'd leave that rusty nut right where it is, as-is. A reminder of the patina of the bike when it arrived.
I couldn't agree more. You have to keep one semi-noticeable thing completely unrestored. I've done that in all my restorations. It one of those "attention to detail" things that adds a little something to the restoration. The casual observer will never notice but someone who's into bikes will appreciate it and know exactly what you've done. I don't guess you have the original hand grips do you?
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Old 05-04-2012, 02:02 PM   #133
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Thanks for the suggestion, gents. I'll have to give it some thought, by first reaction is not to go that route. I have an entire bucket of spare, replaced, and left over parts that I can go look at any time I want to remember the "patina" (I prefer to consider it neglect) that the bike had when it came to me.

I think it would look like I forgot something - fixed everything then ran out of money before I could fix the nut.

Also, keep in mind, that I don't actually know what kind of condition the bike was in when Papa rode it. He stopped riding it at least two years before I ever saw it, and then it sat in a family members backyard for another two years. It could have been in much better shape when he rode it.
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"We are very good at preparing to live, but not very good at living."
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-05-2012, 11:44 AM   #134
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I had a few hours this morning, so I went out to the garage. No major progress, but things that needed to be done.

I decided to put the center stand back on. I never reinstalled it after having the frame powder coated, and figured I'd better do it before I add more stuff to the bike and make the task more difficult.

Here's what I'm sifting through every time I'm looking for parts:



As thorough and clear as I thought I was when I marked every individual baggy, I'm now questioning some of the things I wrote. I suppose it would have made more sense if I had kept working on the project in a timely manner, but now I've forgotten much of the details. Go figure! Oh well, I'll get through!

I can't say enough about the bolt kit from BMW Hucky. It's so nice to know what I'm looking for, search through a bucket of labeled and grouped fasteners, and grab the one I need. I've purchased bolt kits for other bikes in the past, but they were never this nicely organized. Here's the bolts I needed for the center stand:



And here's the kind of work that's going to take a lot of my time from here on out. Here's the kickstand stop before and after a cleaning. 5 minutes with a wire brush, so no big deal, but it will certainly add up with all of the parts that will require this kind of attention.





Then I went out to mount that piece so I could run the spring for the center stand to it. That's when I realized that I couldn't mount it yet because it mounts to the engine mounting bolt. So, I wrapped it in glad wrap to keep it clean and through it back in the baggy it came from. Then I installed the center stand and bungied it up so it would flop around.







Shiny new stainless bolts! Applying anti-seize on every fastener will get old, but I'm still glad I went with stainless.



Flipped back over and back on it's temporary wheels:



Then, just for fun, I decided to throw the tank and seat on to see how it looks. Not bad, not bad at all!







Then back to being a bit more productive. I went ahead and threw in the new progressive shock springs.



At this point it donned on me that I had never cut my headlight ears (to account for the thicker SJ BMW top brace that I'm using) before having them painted. Damn! I'm not going to use or mount the turn signals though, so I thought that might make up enough room for them to fit. Nope:





Damn. Oh well, I guess I'll talk to the painter and see what he thinks. Maybe if I tape them while they're being cut I can get by without causing too much damage.

Oh, and that nut that we discussed above? Perhaps a compromise: I put some Rub N Buff on it just to see what it would look like. I like it - it's not shiny new chrome, but it looks nice at a quick glance. And, if you look closer, you can see the pitting and effects of time on it. I may still replace it down the road, but for now I'm happy with it.



And that's it. I killed nearly two hours and got next to nothing done - is it any wonder that this project is taking me years to complete?!?!?

I'm assembling my next (and hopefully last) large order for more needed parts. Hopefully more on that soon.
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1973 BMW R60/5:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=608166
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Old 05-05-2012, 12:45 PM   #135
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Man that old girl looks mighty fine. Excellent work on the bike and true to your nature as a skilled craftsman the photography and post overall, is top notch and well received sir....carry on!
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