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Old 03-14-2015, 07:33 PM   #1
innathyzit OP
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Flat tyres on airheads.

Got a rear flat on Sunday creek road this arvo. Big nail in the tyre so was obviously a puncture, but I only had a 21" tube on me, but apparently they work ok to get you home. Fortunately I was also carrying my shed tyre levers so changing the tube would be a doddle. Or so I thought.

Tyre unbeaded easily, but try as I may I could not get the tyre off one side of the rim to insert the tube. It is a Mitas tube type tyre and the seal area was quite munted looking, mind you it is a fcuk site more munted now after 50 odd kms ridden flat.

Got home ok with that rare combination of seeing lots of scenery and riding sideways.

Anyway the point is what do other airhead guys do for puncture issues? I don't want to use tubes anymore cos its a deal breaker if this happens again.

Whats the best stuff to carry etc?
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Old 03-14-2015, 07:52 PM   #2
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The issue for me is normally getting the tyre to un-bead. After that its fairly straightforward. Don't know what your issue might have been aside from Mitas Tyres having relatively rigid sidewalls?

I'm tube type all round, because I already run one in the front, & like to be able drop pressures for snotty stuff.

I carry a long tyre iron, & the two stock BMW ones. I find those enough. I carry two tubes, a puncture repair kit, & a pump in the back kriega pack.

Getting a tubeless to reinstall can also be a shit...
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Old 03-14-2015, 08:02 PM   #3
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Have a crack at using your centre stand by, tilting the bike on is side using the centre Stand on the bead. Just thinking
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Old 03-14-2015, 08:02 PM   #4
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Torpedo 7 has some good stuff

http://www.torpedo7.co.nz/products/T...h-bead-breaker

You really need three levers and I recently bought a bead buddy, once you break the bead you insert it and the spoke holds it.
Look out for pinching, supposed to use talcum powder on the tube to stop folded edges, they wear pretty fast...found that out on the race bike.
The BMW toolkit ones are really a bit small.
I'd like one of them round tool tubes like on TM.
I once got caught out with a flat, stuffed lots of grass in the tyre and rode slowly....
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Old 03-14-2015, 08:55 PM   #5
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Hi there innathyzit.
I can feel your pain. I have commented before on this issue however seemed to be the only one in the airhead world that found it a problem changing tyres on a GS (well apart from Disston- he agrees with me so I feel not quite so hopeless).
Fitting the KLR tyres was as easy as MTB tyres.

The last few times that I have got new front tyres put on by very experienced tyre fitters they have had to wail on the tyre to get the bead over the rim. In fact the last time I went in to get the new D606 fitted the guy was really embarrassed to admit he couldn't do it. He could get it halfway done but didn't want to stretch the bead to slip it over. He is very very experienced at this & a respected tyre dude (he didn't want me to tell anyone either he couldn't do it so I won't name names)
As the tyre wasn't able to be returned I coaxed him into trying again with a c clamp & a frick load of grunting & manipulating. Consequently we got got it on however beading it took a lot of riding half full getting it hot then maxing out the compressor to seat it.


I'm no expert but I believe the rims are a lot wider than normal bike wheels.
I also believe it has something to do with the side wall of the D606 being so gosh darn thick & the shallowness of the rim. I think the Mitas E07 has similar traits.These rims remember are supposed to be tubeless so maybe they don't allow for the depression for the bead to sit in while the tube is fitted.

As I only replace the rear at the finishing rotation of the Chinese year cycle I can't comment on the rear but believe it is pretty much the same as the front.

So no real help for you I'm sorry but although I do carry a couple of tyre levers & a tube I am sure that in the thick of battle I will end up doing as you did & ride the fucker out on the flattie.

i would actually like to see a youtube video of someone changing a set of GS flat tyres in the field with the normal tools they carry with them Sure you can do normal wheels in 2 mins in a workshop but tired, dusty, running late & pissed off is another kettle of fish.

BTW went for a pootle out Wairoa gorge yest after checking out the vintage truck display. Saw a red GS without a screen riding around.

Will post a challenge up on the airhead section to see if anyone can do it

Done! http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1050048

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Old 03-14-2015, 09:10 PM   #6
wairau
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interesting

never seen em, but sounds like those rims are shallow in the middle alright.

doesnt seem much point carrying tubes if you cant get them in. may as well just do as you did. run tubeless if you have the choice, carry some sticky strings and run mitas or heidenaus that are stiff enough to ride flat

not sure how those puncture repair aerosol cans go with tubes. never tried.
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Old 03-14-2015, 09:28 PM   #7
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I fitted a new tyre to the front of my Mono the other day - on the tyre machine at work, no problems. I've only had one puncture on the Airhead, on the way to work, so no problems again. I only use 3 small 170mm (7'') levers on any bike tyre, sometimes I'll use a longer lever to get the first bite over the rim. Learning to fix car tyres in the early '70's as an apprentice with no tyre machine, I was taught - if you are having to force it, you are doing something wrong. I have tubeless and tube tyres for the Airhead, breaking the bead on the tubeless is very hard without a machine, with the tube tyres (on the same rims) they break with just a boot. I carry a tubeless repair kit when running tubeless, and levers and patch kit when on my tube wheels.
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Old 03-14-2015, 09:38 PM   #8
innathyzit OP
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Good stuff guys.

Unbeading wasn't an issue, as I generally ride a wee way after the oh shit moment to warm the tyre up and find shade/flat ground etc.

I got part of the tyre over the rim, but could just not get any more over. Funny thing is , I took the old Pirelli off easy and fitted this one easy peasy when it was new. Maybe more patience next time., and possibly a bit of lube which I didn't have.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:20 PM   #9
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I pinched a tube trying to get a T63 on my 530 rear wheel, so I would be toast trying to deal with a beamer flat. I get the idea of tubeless rims but have been a tube guy for too long to change ....old dog thing I guess.

If you fitted a K60 you might be OK, you'd never get it off on the trail but the side walls are so stiff you'd never notice if it was flat.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:29 PM   #10
innathyzit OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by innathyzit View Post
Good stuff guys.

Unbeading wasn't an issue, as I generally ride a wee way after the oh shit moment to warm the tyre up and find shade/flat ground etc.

I got part of the tyre over the rim, but could just not get any more over. Funny thing is , I took the old Pirelli off easy and fitted this one easy peasy when it was new. Maybe more patience next time., and possibly a bit of lube which I didn't have.

Sorry for quoting myself, but just went to the shed and using the same tools I carry, except the compressor, I just took the munted Mitas off and fitted the old tubeless metzler . 45 minutes-ish Wheel on to Wheel on. How awesome am I?



Fcuk tubes.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:42 PM   #11
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so does no one run tubeless tires on their gs's?
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:45 PM   #12
innathyzit OP
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Originally Posted by Mark_S View Post
so does no one run tubeless tires on their gs's?

I do now. Actually the only reason I put a tube in my rear is because the guy at the bike shop ordered the wrong tyre. He said the supplier had no tubeless ones, but pretty sure he was fibbing to cover his ass.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:58 PM   #13
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For tubeless don't you need the external spoked wheels?
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:07 PM   #14
innathyzit OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltaire View Post
For tubeless don't you need the external spoked wheels?

Yes.
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:25 PM   #15
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I recently had a new Shinko 466 put on the rear of the GSPD. Same afternoon had to go back to the workshop and get a new tube put in. The impressive thing about it was that we were 2 up and rode it 10km with no air (stem had pulled out of the tube) and at slow speeds, wouldn't have known it was flat

The guy asked why I had a tube in it, had to admit, just an old habit.
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