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Old 02-14-2011, 07:26 PM   #46
Bartron OP
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Day 2: Kendrick, ID to Ontario, OR

As we fell asleep the night before, we could hear blaring country music in the background. I hoped it was some nearby festival and not a pick-up truck with spot lights on the hunt for stowaway adventure bikers.

Waking up to the cold frost was made much better by the efforts of Revelstoker who promised to brew up some primo coffee every morning. Without his coffee, I'm afraid I'd be a non-starter.



By the time the sun rose, I was sipping some Starbucks coffee and watching him make another batch. After all, what sort of ride report with a BMW would this be without Starbucks?



Everything was covered in frost and took a while to warm up.



Meanwhile, Revelstoker was at his usual morning best and waiting on the road to get going.



It was then that he revealed his sinister plan. The only way we were going to complete this ride was to ride from sunrise to sunset. Once the GPS indicated sunset we should start looking for a place to pitch tents. WHOA! Them are some long days, pardner!

Looks like time was already ticking:



I got my hustle on and hit the road. Unlike most of the time, it was easier to catch Revelstoker this time because his bike was parked.



We had high hopes of grabbing some breakfast in Kendrick but were disappointed as the town was still sleeping so we pressed on to Lewiston.

When we were about to descend into the Lewiston valley and I noticed this heavy cloud cover drifting into the valley like a cloud waterfall.



Revelstoker saw a barn he liked.



As we approached the entrance to the valley the roads opened up into undulating freeways of gravel. Thankfully, there was enough vista that I could see the groups of deer about to cross my path a long ways ahead and avoid them.

We soon began the descent into Lewiston.

Being slow has advantages, like being able to catch pictures of your faster friends.



In Lewiston we filled up with gas and picked the first coffee shop we could find. This one happened to be of a spiritual nature.



One of the older locals was really nice and wanted to know all about our trip. He spoke of phenomenal rides beyond the valley. I couldn't tell him where we were going as I just followed Revelstoker and the GPS. Kind of an Adventure Lemming, I guess.

I ordered the biggest breakfast sandwich they had while Revelstoker played with his coffee cup.



On our way out of Lewiston we crossed the Snake River into Washington State. We then followed the Snake River south for a while. Revelstoker tried to race the river boat for a head to head finish...



...but because we were the tourists, he let them win.



We broke from the Snake River and ventured into the Asotin Range and eventually into Oregon State, making way for Hell's Canyon.



As we climbed the endless red-earthed switchbacks, the vistas were incredible.



Even the road conditions were great.



I don't usually see this end of Revelstoker's bike so thought I should document it as he arrived at the Hell's Canyon information board.



It definitely humbles our 'hard core' adventure when a bunch of Indians would do this trail several times per year without the aid of fossil fuels.



We found a nice ridge to model the bikes...



...show off our gear...



...entice Wolfman to sponsor us...







...and take a picture that I though would share with my mom what this was all about.



Of course, my dad thought it looked like I was taking a leak.

We finally found a landmark...



...and continued on our way out of the Hell's Canyon and continued to enjoy the scenery of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

I think we were on this trail...



...that continued in high-speed double-track through the valleys and easy switchbacks over the peaks.



For a long while, that which lay ahead looked just like that behind us.



The terrain soon became more forest like and we came upon this ranger station with a petrol pump. Thinking my low fuel problems were over, I was disappointed to find its value purely ornamental.



When we saw this sign, just before the turn-off to the Hells Canyon lookout, we dreamed of crossing flooded bridges and dried-up riverbeds in our super-cool adventure bikes but our route went a different way. Bummer.



The Hells Canyon lookout offered a view that was no different than our 'Wolfman Photo Shoot' and thus I was more distracted with this guy than the view.



For those who like to know:





We got tired of the tourist traffic near the look-out and found a much better way to reach the Hells Canyon Reservoir. Reading this sign made me smile in anticipation.



The road wasn't all that scary but had no guardrails.



Coming up this trail from the valley was a Toyota RAV4 - took the wind out of my sails a little.



I had packed my camelback but had refused to use it yet. I thought I was man enough to resist evaporation. My fatigue meant I came in red hot for this curve as I admired the Payette range of Idaho across the reservoir.



Necessitation a change of shorts in these flowers. Skibum69, I thought of you while taking this shot - because of the flowers, not the shorts.



A big sign for a big descent to the reservoir.



While riding south along the reservoir, we came across this little beauty:



Time for a lunch and fuel stop in Halfway, Oregon. I can't remember why it's called Halfway, but Revelstoker might.



We ate at a restaurant with this in front of it. It was some of the worst service I have ever received. Nonetheless, we filled our bellies and Revelstoker's camelback and made a move on out of the valley.



We continued to head south along the Brownlee Reservoir and the views were stunning.



The shadows formed by the sinking sun made for a spectacular sight.



We would end up riding along the river for miles on end.



This shot puts things in scale.



The wave reflections on the water would make beautiful patterns and reminded me of how much I've enjoyed physics - no, really.



Just before the Brownlee Reservoir become the Snake River again, we broke west.



At this point, my 'cool guy' antics of not needing to use my camelback were beginning to catch up with me and the little headache that started a hundred miles back was not a raging migraine leaving me hurting, unenthused and sloppy. We happened to intersect the Old Oregon Trail Highway 84 and at the gas station there I told Revelstoker I was in bad shape and needed to break soon. I didn't realize we'd be going sunup to sundown and was foolish with water replenishment. I offered to pay for a room just to get a rest and rehydrate.

After he took my confession, Revelstoker agreed to get a room and made me promise to use my camelback and be drinking all the time.

We made our way down to Ontario, OR and found a nice Holiday Inn Express. Sure, it was a little out of the budget but I didn't care. I offered to pick up the room since it was my fault we needed it and I was just happy to have a bed tonight.

In the parking lot, Revelstoker noticed an oil leak and took apart his skidplate to check things out. To be safe, he ran out to get some oil 'just in case'.

I was really grateful Revelstoker took it all in stride and didn't want to 'de-friend' me on CreepBook.

You may have picked up that we have different approaches to life. I think this can best be summarized by our gear in the hotel.

Revelstoker:



Bartron:




Total Mileage: 302 miles
Total Ascent: 23,607 ft
Total Descent: 23,941 ft
Total Time: 12 hours
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:54 PM   #47
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"I was really grateful Revelstoker took it all in stride and didn't want to 'de-friend' me on CreepBook.
You may have picked up that we have different approaches to life. I think this can best be summarized by our gear in the hotel."


Opposites attract buddy...I'm sure you've heard that one before. Look at us - I still remember the days you brought those flowers to one of the rides!


Besides, I owe you for not letting me 'call it a day' and go into the netherworld after the little incident a few years ago!


Oh, I think they called it Halfway because it was halfway between nothing!
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Old 02-14-2011, 08:07 PM   #48
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Thanks man, the power has been out here all night and I have all that I need.
A fireplace, a headlamp and a good story.
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:24 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Revelstoker View Post
Besides, I owe you for not letting me 'call it a day' and go into the netherworld after the little incident a few years ago!

I don't know Rich. It looks like the doc is yanking your wedding ring off. I think he is calling it. Did you check your pockets after? Was that the deer vs HP2?

Nice work Bartron. This RR has been sitting in my subscriptions since what, September? Last summer I managed to ride a few of the places you went in late '09.
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Old 02-15-2011, 01:46 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by B-Rod View Post
I don't know Rich. It looks like the doc is yanking your wedding ring off. I think he is calling it. Did you check your pockets after? Was that the deer vs HP2?

Nice work Bartron. This RR has been sitting in my subscriptions since what, September? Last summer I managed to ride a few of the places you went in late '09.
Thanks for the props B-Rod. Very observant of you, as I was indeed removing his wedding ring. I figured I'd hate to see it have to be cut and figured the nurses may give him a bit more attention if they thought he was single. I also stashed his GPS just in case the deer had a lawyer curious about the HP2's velocity. It's what friends do - besides bringing flowers to rides.

Hope you liked the Invermere ride, I'm hoping to do it again this year.
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Old 02-15-2011, 02:25 PM   #51
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Hope you liked the Invermere ride, I'm hoping to do it again this year.
Be sure to invite me. Have bike, will travel.

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Old 02-15-2011, 07:15 PM   #52
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Day 3: Ontario, OR to Bruneau Canyon, ID

Holiday Inn Express has great beds. It's no secret they spent the money on beds and not breakfast. After a speedy affair of sausage patties, eggs, yogurt and coffee we were ready to hit the road.



As you can see, at least 12 hours of riding would be ahead of us. Both mentally and physically, these would be some of the most challenging 12 hours of my life.

After leaving Ontario, we flip-flipped between Oregon and Idaho several times. The roads were fast and open which made for some great high speed cruising.



Occasionally I'd stop to snap a photo of the varied topography...



...then return to eating Revelstoker's dust.



It feels great to rip down these backroads at highway speed. Just you and the wind.



Out here, it's not the police I worry about.



We rode through the Succor Creek State Rec Area and continued on to Jordan Valley, OR for some fuel. As I'm walking out of the station with some drinks in hand I see this:



Initially I thought it had to do with the forks puking oil through the preload adjusters on the first day. Turned out, the fork guards had shifted and left their mark on the stanchions. We would be able to continue on.



After adjusting the protectors we headed out onto the T2 route of Martin Hacksworth's Tour of Idaho, beginning with the Owyhee Uplands in Oregon.



We continued on into the Owyhee in Idaho.



After miles of smooth winding dirt, where I can practice my best Despres imitation, we come to the Dougald Reservoir, complete with ducks.



Revelstoker must have been doing his Coma impression because he rolled in a bit later. He said something about a 'moustache'd man'.



We continue on after a hydration break and come to this delectable crack in the earth's mantle - hiding the North Fork Owyhee River. Not much to it, actually. Ride in, ride out.



Just as we came out of that canyon, we were awestruck by this bygone to an era when religious movements were moved with a bulldozer.

http://bartron.smugmug.com/Rides/Rid...45_a8yE7-L.jpg

I've always wondered what it's like to drive a KLR and now was my chance to find out.



I thought this hour meter was fascinating in a 'steam-punk' kind of way. I reckon this bad boy had put in 4021 hours of service. I have no idea what the life-cycle of one of these guys is but I figure they must have used the wrong oil. If only GSpot was around back then to help a feller out.



This thing was just so cool I wish I could have brought it back. I know my wife would have objected but the kids would have loved it!

Looks like fuel quality was an issue - must have come stock with KTM fuel filter and pump.



We continued on for some time on meandering hard-packed dirt trails. Up and down, side to side, washed out here, washed out there. I quickly realized that with my steering damper, less is more - otherwise I couldn't flick the bike as easily from one side of the trail to the other to avoid washouts.

Here's Revelstoker coming up on Twin Springs Ridge.



Here I am cresting the saddle on Juniper Mountain.



Quick little water break and you can see further down the trail how rutted things get. Let's just say there were a few pucker moments of two-wheel drifting down sharp descents. Unfortunately for you, my camera was not the thing I was reaching for in those times.



Here's Revelstoker's artistic impression of me coming down into Bull Basin.



The calm before the storm as we near Cutcher Crossing of the Owyhee River. It was flat, fast and hot.



The Owyhee Canyon (as it's typically called, I think) is quite inviting from a distance...



...but its reputation precedes it and seemed to me to be a case of 'good from far but far from good'. Remember now, I'm riding a 500 lb cabin cruiser compared to Revelstoker's runabout. Thus, some of the descents into the canyon made me pucker. The key, I found, is never to allow yourself to lose momentum. This is the 'drop-off' often cited in reports but it's really more of a roll'over with some skid-plate scraping. I read a bit about this part and so when I identified that I was about to roll over it and saw Revelstoker crouched with his camera ready for action - I stopped and considered my line choice.



I should have just kept going to clean the section but my mind was not strong enough. Little did I know this would be only a warm up.

Picked a line and rolled on over - no drama, no fuss but dangly feet killed the picture.



We rode on down to the bottom only to realize that we should have banked to rider's left a fair but up the way to reach the crossing. Instead, we reached the reeds.



Then scuttled back up...



...where I tried to catch speedy Revelstoker crossing the majestic Owyhee River.



I crossed the river with no drama and no picture. Perhaps subconsciously I really wanted that picture because on the way out, I got well stuck in the river-floor silt.



I tried the 'bounce the rear end' manouver, the 'rock it forward and spin' manouver and even the 'pray to Jebus' manouver - all to no avail.



At this point I was already getting exhausted. The stress of the previous descent, the incessant heat, the futile effort to get the beast moving.



Did I mention it was hot?



Revelstoker and I pitched the bike over on its side, pulled it out of the rut and I was able to get moving. The deep silt did not make things easy. Revelstoker insisted I move my weight back but when you're riding an elephant, moving your weight back ain't gonna do shit.

Next came the climb out of the canyon. I went first and was making good headway clinging desperately to the right-side of the trail where there was a smidge of traction. Sure enough, halfway up, the front end bounces on a rock and I end up in the left-sided gully. Furk.

My tank is empty. I'm exhausted. My muscles are jello and it's freaking 40 degrees out. I can't get the bitch to hook up as the loose rocks roll away and the tire slips on any of the stable out-cropping rocks.



My stubby legs couldn't help the bike along. Revelstoker came up behind me and had to lay his bike down to help as there was no way he was sneaking by me.

We pushed and slipped, and huffed and puffed but everytime we thought we had a viable position we lost it.

I was defeated. Physically I was done a while ago but now I was losing my mental advantage. I would have paid a helicopter to get me out of there. None were in sight.

I think Revelstoker was getting frustrated with my level of deconditioning but I was doing all I could. Last time I felt this way was when I was stuck along the Athabasca river in snow and mud with zero grip while darkness fell and the November temperatures dipped below zero. At least time time I had a friend.

I told Revelstoker I needed a breather. I needed to catch my breath and take some mental inventory. Bladder needed a break too. I heard in the distance that Revelstoker was trying to get the beast to budge.

Attempt, roost, stall. Attempt, roost, stall. Attempt, roost.........no stall. He got going and made it up to the next bend. I could have kissed him - if I had the strength.

I surveyed the scene of our misery.





Still panting, I gathered my gear and started the long walk up towards the switchback. There was no way to leave the bike standing so Revelstoker laid her over. It took me a couple minutes to put on my gear and prepare to lift her up.



As I fired her up, I realized my gloves were missing. Dropped them? No. Pockets? No.

I left them at the scene of meltdown.

I lay the bike down and take off the helmet. With all the other gear start picking my way down the trail to get them. I was out of breath going DOWN-hill! After looking around I finally found them and began the long trek back.



Once I got going, there was no way I was stopping. I probably couldn't if I tried. All I had going for me was muscle memory.



Revelstoker parked at the head of the next climbing section to wait. I wasn't stopping.



It was so nice to cruise for a while. We booked it across the Yp Desert.



We marked our path to enable a way back. Our version of bread crumbs.



We then turned east and had miles and miles of fence line to run.



It was a compromise. You couldn't go down the middle because of hidden rim-crushers. The left rut had sage brush whipping your feet off the pedals at 40-50mph while the right rut was easier on the sage brush but the prospect of getting too close to that fence made the sage-brush whipping tolerable.



Revelstoker would consistently be about 10 mph faster which meant I didn't spend too much time eating his dust.



The road finally became more interesting once we dipped into the Piute Basin.



The road changed from this...



..to this in no time.



I love this kind of riding though so it suited me just fine.



The trail quickly became less and less obvious in the Antelope Basin. We didn't see any antelope, in case you were wondering.



Your attention was split between route finding and avoiding sage bushes.



We were quite excited when we came upon this sign of life after following Antelope Creek in the bush. I guess someone had mail.



Revelstoker crossed over Sheep Creek in fine form.



After an already long day, came this. It was like having your bike kick you in the ass repeatedly. Also, because some of the rocks were pointy, you had to navigate through them to avoid a pinch flat. The going was slow but the destination sweet. Bruneau Canyon.



Bruneau Canyon was unbelievable. We got there just as the sun was going down.



There is a weathered shack at the entrance to the canyon which made for good bike parking...



...and noodle making space. We had gone through so much water in the day that there was very little left for the noodles or morning coffee. We realized we haven't seen a soul since early morning.



We realized the building had tons of broken glass and old nails so we moved the bikes outside and set-up our tents with the building as a wind screen.



We surveyed the scene for tomorrow. I was terrified and didn't bring my camera. After a very technical and loose drop-in, this was the trail:



And here I am looking from the trail at what lies beyond the non-existent guardrail.



I walk fairly far down the trail to figure out a line. The loose rock is to the right with more 'china rocks' on the left but the left also has the rock wall with plenty sticking out of it. I figure my best bet is to hug the left and preserve safety room on the right.

As for dropping in, my line involves dropping from the very right edge of the entrance diagonally through the babyhead lava rocks to the left of the trail. Momentum is key and speed control will be tricky.

I keep visualizing the line in my head as I walk back.

As we lay in our tents that night, side by side (the tents, not us), we discussed the day and bikes for a long while. I think this is the point that I decided it would be more fun to do this kind of riding on a smaller bike.

Could it be done on the F8? Sure. She'll get beat up and I've had to pimp her up a bit but it is doable. But 'doable' and relatively 'effortless fun' are two completely different things. I envied the suspension travel of Revelsoker's bike as well as it's flickability.

We say good night and I visualize the canyon, over and over and over.....




Total Mileage: 262 miles
Total Ascent: 15,404 ft
Total Descent: 12,824 ft
Total Time: 12 hours
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Bartron screwed with this post 02-15-2011 at 07:29 PM
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Old 02-15-2011, 10:06 PM   #53
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Loving it!!
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Old 02-15-2011, 11:28 PM   #54
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:39 AM   #55
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"We were quite excited when we came upon this sign of life after following Antelope Creek in the bush. I guess someone had mail."

What's crazy about the mailbox is that it is really in the middle of nowhere other than that a junction in the road. Not a lot of residential developments happening in that neck of the woods. Bart forgot to mention that we had to personalize the mailbox. The FB stickers are all environmentally safe, were never tested on animals and are biodegradable...in about 75 years.
After the dehydration event the day prior, Bart just decided to leave the hose in his mouth at all times.
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:49 AM   #56
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I forgot to mention...great job on the Ride Report! Reminds me of how much fun, how interesting those trips can be and how many we've been on that were a total blast. Seeing the country on two wheels cannot be bettered!
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Old 02-16-2011, 11:04 AM   #57
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Great report Bartron. Now that you've conquered T2, when are you scheduled for a run at T1? :)

How did you guys like those Wolfman Expedition bags? Did they hold up to the abuse pretty well?

Cheers,
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:17 PM   #58
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Great report Bartron. Now that you've conquered T2, when are you scheduled for a run at T1? :)

How did you guys like those Wolfman Expedition bags? Did they hold up to the abuse pretty well?
Hey Andy, thanks for checking in, I know it's been a wait.

We've been debating tackling more of T1 this year. Hard to say because on the bigger bikes, things are really weather dependent. What would be doable in the dry becomes stupid in the wet. Rich is the ride-itecht and chief planner so he would know what's up for this year.

The bags held up really well. We were very impressed. There were definitely a few things we would change. For one, they need to be about 4 inches longer (front to back) enabling them to accommodate more stuff easily. Also, and this was a real PITA, the strapping that loops over the top should be at least 2 feet longer. That would enable you to strap on something light onto the bag like a jacket, tent, shoes, whatever. As it were, with the bags full, it sometimes took effort to close the strap that runs over the top.

Overall great product but hopefully Wolfman is reading this
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:09 PM   #59
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Day 4: Bruneau Canyon, ID to Pocatello, ID

I had to sleep with earplugs in as there was some wildlife (lizard or mouse) running around outside the tent making noise all night. No respect!

First order of the day was to enjoy the sunrise as we sipped our highly concentrated coffee with left-over noodles. Coffee-chicken noodles aren't as bad as you'd think.



With all the drama in the Owyhee Canyon, the centerstand on the F8 slipped under the pannier racks and there was no way to slip it out by hand. With the minimal tools we had, I loosened the rack and popped out the centerstand leg. That part was easy. Lining up the rack with the passenger peg wasn't. I made a pile or rocks I could lean the bike on to force the rack into position. Thankfully it worked or I'd be without a centerstand all day. That being said, not having the darn thing klacking away on the rough sections was nice.



We quickly packed up and got ready to go. It would be a long day and we had no idea what Bruneau Canyon was going to throw at us. We had just over 12 hours of sunlit riding according to the all-knowing GPS.



As usual, I politely waited to pack until Revelstoker was done.



We didn't hesitate much before dropping into the canyon. The less forethought and preplanning the better. Revelstoker was first and just a few steps ahead of me. I squared up for my line of descent and as I was doing so I was watching Revelstoker drop in. His line was different. His line deviated.

By way of evil babyheads, Revelstoker's front end was bounced to within a foot of the downhill edge of the trail. Thankfully he managed to recover it and ride on as if nothing happened. I was even happier with my line choice now.

Once I cleared the entrance, I stopped to take a pic of the descent. As usual, the camera doesn't pass on how steep it was.



Looking back:



This pic would have been taken from where Revelstoker is standing, two pictures above. You can just make out the trail.



The slope eased off but the soft ground with lava rocks continued.



The hut at the bottom of the canyon. Presumably it held the towels, amenities and change rooms for the Indian Hot Springs in their heyday.



Revelstoker descending towards the hot springs.



The Indian Hot Springs reveal themselves.



Revelstoker surveying the scene.



This algea was incredible. It reminded me of a cartoon as I waited for one of them to blink.



The springs are now part of the 'Adventure Travel' segment and thus can offer 5-star ratings with 2-star amenities.



On closer inspection of the site, the soaker tub was within walking distance of the hot-pool.



I contemplated getting in, in the buff of course, but figured we were a long ways from the tetanus shot I would invariably need.



As a reward for putting up the the shenanigans, I gave the bike a hot shower.



After taking all the pictures we could we made a move across the rickety bridge.



The secret to this bridge crossing is lane choice.



The way out of the canyon required staying as far to the right as possible. This skill I had picked up from the Owyhee Canyon the day before.



Here's looking back at the canyon floor. Please pay attention to that big rock on the right side of the trail. That bastard nearly tore off my right foot. Thank God for motocross boots.



Halfway out of the canyon we came upon this derelict vehicle.



It was modified to fulfill a mystery purpose. Given our backgrounds, we had imagined it ran the only tow-rope at the Indian Hot Springs Ski Club. Operations halted due to lack of snow.





Like any proper vehicle, this one needed an ornament. What could be more fitting?



From this shot across the canyon, you can just make out the old hut where we slept last night.



The following shot is me coming out of the canyon over the last step-up. It's not the best shot and won't win me any sponsorship deals but it does illustrate two things. I move fast enough to fool Revelstoker's trigger finger and more importantly, the sun was directly in our eyes as we climbed out on this trial. Riding a bike on a narrow, rocky trail and hitting step-ups and other obstacles by feel because you can't see anything sucks. It's also scary.



Not to get too excited, out of the canyon was more of this...



...much more.



Nonetheless, we soldiered on - at whatever speed we could.



I think the same guy made this sign, and designed the pick-up truck tow rope.



This sign had much to say.



It's a long walk with only one shoe. Random. Maybe it's from when Forrest Gump ran across the country?



As we made our way across the desert we began to catch glimpses of promise in the distance. We celebrated with a picture.



Insert random Wolfman bag promo shot here:



I'm proud to say that sweetgrass travelled on the bag all the way from Antelope Flats. It was a way of bring the desert to the....



mountains!!! They were far of in the distance but their presence was palpable. We had to be careful though - the pylon told us so.



The landscape out here is amazing. You're hauling ass on the straightaways...



... and then you come to this. A chasm in the landscape.



You dip into this canyon to find lush and fertile ground fed by Cedar Creek.





Because I waited long enough to take this picture...



I lost the track and had to overland it back to the trail.



The Salmon Falls Dam was starting to show its age.





I really wanted to get a pic of me with my finger in one of those leaks but figured even being a 'friendly Canadian' may not get me out of that one.



We stopped at a really quaint diner in Rogerson.



I couldn't resist taking fuel from this guy.



We met a really friendly rancher outside the diner who inundated us with stories of his experiences with Canada and Canadians. It was quite entertaining. Inside, the diner was part diner and part convenience store. A third part was the post-office. Turns out the previous owner of this diner has held the postal license from days of old. Here is the post office they've been using up until a few years ago.



We both had a great meal and chatted up the owner who bought the business from her mother.





Revelstoker risked getting horse-kicked to get this shot.



Revelstoker can fill you in on these two characters, I've forgotten their names but their stories are priceless.

After Rogerson we hightailed it through the Sawtooth National Forest. Nice sweeping turns...



...made for mellow riding...



...with beautiful views.



The road along the Lower Goose Creek Reservoir was smooth, fast and full of blind corners. Drift city!



We pulled into Oakley, ID for gas, Red Bull and snackage. A short skip from Oakley was the City of Rocks. What an incredible place in the middle of nowhere.









As we were making our way to the Power range of the Sawtooth National Forest we were attempting to make good time. This guy slowed us down until we figured out he was some sort of park official.



As we finally entered the Sawtooth National Forest again, we were happy to share the road with anyone.



The trail varied from shallow sand to double-track. At one point, I was getting tired and almost missed a sharp right hander. Instead I did my best Dakar impression and simultaneously drifted both wheels and dumped speed enough to make the turn. Neither one of us could believe we weren't looking for my teeth in the sand.



Soon after exiting the park, we ran into these lovelies...



...and their keeper.



It was starting to get late so we high-tailed it to Pocatello to see Martin Hacksworth's pole.

Wait, that didn't sound right. Here's a picture:



We wanted to do three things.

Sign the guest book:



Tag his toolbox:



Meet Martin and thank him in person for all his hard work putting this route together. Lucky for us he was home.



We had arrived at one of the major milestones of this trip. Here's one more pic. Love the pirate flag.



It was starting to get dark already so we found a budget hotel in town with wi-fi and settled in for the evening. I figure if given the chance, a hot shower and a real bed is the way too go. We would be spending plenty of time in places with neither.

We had checked with Martin about getting our tires changed as we had very little tread left out back. He recommended Pocatello Power Sports and told us to let them know we were on the Tour and they would take care of us.

We planned to be there first thing in the morning.


Total Mileage: 284 miles
Total Ascent: 19,199 ft
Total Descent: 19,318 ft
Total Time: 12 hours
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Ride on.

==================================
:: Furious Basterds: Velox, Vehemens, Oblivio
::
:: "For those who don't understand, no explanation is possible. For those who do, none is necessary."
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Old 02-17-2011, 01:20 PM   #60
Crazylegs Bob
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Location: Dundalk, Ontario
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Great RR! Nice to see some fellow Canucks roaming free! Revelstoker, how are you liking the Giant Loop Coyote bag? I have a 640 also and was contemplating a similar setup but with Pelican side cases.
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