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Old 11-25-2010, 01:11 PM   #301
schattat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
BTW, What is the black jobbie under the fuse box to the right in the picture above?
You probably mean the backup power supply for the GPS, so when you cut the mains switch the GPS will still run. Also, it helps let the GPS run when you electric start the bike as the voltage may shortly cut-off and reset the GPS.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
Also I see you are running only one ICO/IMO, and a cap repeater, and I right? I was wondering what you thought of running two ICO's, I see quite few people do it, but I find one pretty difficult to deal with by itself. Do you know why people go for two and what made you stick with just one
The second tripmaster is usually there just to tell you your speed, or just to log the amount of km's of the entire day. It'll come in handy when the primary one gets damaged, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
How are you finding those ICO buttons compared to the stock one? Isn't that schattat's design you have on there?
I sure still hope it is

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
What are you setting your ICO/IMO to 100.00 (hundredths) or 100.0 (tenths of a km)?
Honestly, the hundreths position is the stupidest thing on a long rallye. Depending on how you take a turn here and there it will ALWAYS be off!!! It may be useful in events like in Sardegna where there are hundreds of trees on the track and you can't afford to take the wrong exit
Some of the top pros (e.g. Coma) even cross out the last digits in their RBs:



Sorry for barging in like that, Jenny
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Old 11-25-2010, 01:27 PM   #302
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Thanks for the answers Schattat. Is that GPS battery pack part of the ASO setup or is it an extra?

I know the pros generally block out the 100ths in the roadbook. I didnt on the Sertoes, and found I was out by around 70m/km. So every km, I clicked back 7 times! It gets pretty tiresome, but on a tight course as you say, its useful.

Of course if you have to turn left into the desert at km 145.41, you might only turn left 100m later, and that could put you off course by a fair whack in hectic dunes.

So I was wondering how Jen was going to deal with it.
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Old 11-25-2010, 01:43 PM   #303
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Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
Pity its not 111 again eh?

I like your design big time, nice and simple. Be sure to get some piccies with all the organisation stickers on, I need to see if my Springbokkie is going to get his head chopped off!



BTW, What is the black jobbie under the fuse box to the right in the picture above?

Are you running a stock suspension or did you do an aftermarket job on it?

Also I see you are running only one ICO/IMO, and a cap repeater, and I right? I was wondering what you thought of running two ICO's, I see quite few people do it, but I find one pretty difficult to deal with by itself. Do you know why people go for two and what made you stick with just one.

How are you finding those ICO buttons compared to the stock one? Isn't that schattat's design you have on there? Again Im asking because I was getting tired of pressing the ICO buttons so bloody hard.

What are you setting your ICO/IMO to 100.00 (hundredths) or 100.0 (tenths of a km)? Could you tell me if this is the same as in the past?

Sorry for all the questions!
Hey Neil - no problem - there is nothing more I like than answering nerdy techy questions - truly!

• First up, yep, I reckon the Springbok is going to be wearing an 'Elf' hat at the very least... that said, the compulsory sticker is only meant to be 12x8cm, so you might be able to fit it on somewhere that doesn't encroach on your design too much - as long as it's on the leading panel of the fairing, I believe it's ok (not seen mine yet of course). There is also a similarly sized obligatory sticker to go on the side somewhere - typically the airbox cover, along with your front and side race [number] plates of course.

• The black box below and to the right of the fusebox is the back-up battery for the Unik GPS unit. These cost €11 from ERTF, and of course, you have to have one as should the bike power supply to your GPS fail, at least it will keep it running until the end of the day or so. One ought to be enough, as you really only need to connect it should the bike power go down.

• Suspension is still bog stock on my bike, even using the factory settings! I like my suspension set up pretty soft anyway (I ain't gonna be landing any huge MX jumps any time soon!) and it felt great out of the box. After Tunisia I noticed the rear had sagged noticably, but not in a bad way - it means the rear squats down and digs in for traction (and makes the seat a bit lower!), while the front is still firm in comparison, to support the weight of the nav gear and fuel tanks etc.

I'll see how it rides after a few days on the Dakar, and possibly play with the damping settings a little, but to be honest, for the way I [like to] ride, it's pretty damn good as is?

• I think there are two reasons a lot of riders run twin ICOs (well, ok three if you include they are probably given them!) - the main reason is as a spare I imagine, so there is a back up already in place should one fail in anyway. The other reason is that the ICO units only display one element at a time - either total distance, partial distance or speed. Having two of them allows you to have two different displays at the same time.

I however use a Touratech IMO, which has a dual display for the odo function - that is total and partial distance on the screen at the same time, displayed in exactly the same way as the paper roadbook shows the corresponding numbers (I like that x), and you can also switch the display to speed [and a third, total trip] with the push of a button. Some people have had problems with the Touratech devices, but I rate this version at least.

The other device on my dash is the new Speedocap unit from ERTF - this is a CAP repeater as you surmise, but it is also a speedometer and speed warning device (like a speedox) that warns you when you are in a speed restricted zone, via the GPS.

It also has a third 'odometer' function built in, again linked to the GPS, and Si Pavey explained at the weekend that the Odo is actually reset to what it should be every time you pass a waypoint (stored in the GPS). Therefore you can actually use that function like an 'automatic' ICO - in that the distance covered is your true distance over the ground, and it will self-adjust every time you pass a waypoint, ensuring it corresponds to what is in the roadbook - as long as you don't mess up your navigation badly of course!

He says it works so well as a trip meter, that he doesn't even use a regular ICO anymore! You can also set the display to show either a single individual function, or a combination of two (eg. speed and cap, or odo and speed)... result!

Personally, I'm used to the IMO, and intend to use that (even if it means constantly correcting back and forth during the stage), but will of course use the Odo display on the Speedocap as a back up, should the IMO ever fail. As belt and braces, I'm also taking a spare IMO and sensors etc. courtesy of Touratech UK, which is very nice of them!

• Yes, I am using one of Tony's remotes, and very nice it is too! He supplied it with a second connector plug, so I can use it to run either my IMO or an ICO as required. I did have a problem with it once I'd got back from Tunisia (one day it decided it would only wind the roadbook forward, not backwards for some reason?!) but Tony found and replaced the faulty toggle switch and sorted it no problem!

• As for the reset, as I recall I have it set so that it advances in 10ths of a Kilometer - that is the two decimal points adjust 10,20,30,40 and so on.

Hope that helps!

J x
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Old 11-25-2010, 01:50 PM   #304
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Following on from what Tony said regarding the roadbook numbers - I don't cross out the last digit, rather tend to ignore it unless, as you suggest, there are a couple of tight instructions, then I will use my judgement to either round up or round down the number based on what the IMO is saying - and try to keep the IMO adjusted correctly on a regular basis of course...

J x
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Old 11-25-2010, 02:03 PM   #305
schattat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
I know the pros generally block out the 100ths in the roadbook. I didnt on the Sertoes, and found I was out by around 70m/km. So every km, I clicked back 7 times! It gets pretty tiresome, but on a tight course as you say, its useful
Sounds like you should decrease your wheel circumference then! Stock ICOs have a wheel setting of 220cm, but a brand new Michelin Desert only has 216cm, so every revolution you're adding 4cm!
The ICO's have an AutoCal function that take care of this problem, but I've never really understood how it actually "knows" when to correct and when not to (say I've taken a wrong turn, have to travel back then reset my trip?). Somebody care to clear that up for me (Cummo perhaps)?
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Old 11-25-2010, 04:58 PM   #306
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMo (& piglet)
Thanks Big Adv... but erm, that was Matt Hill's number... and anyone who's seen Race to Dakar will know what tough time he had!

Still, good job I'm not superstitious eh?!

Gonna do my best to make 173 a lucky number!

J x
Shite, been awhile since I've seen it, ay, like whats been said, only good luck left with that #, plus you'll make your own.
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Old 11-25-2010, 06:09 PM   #307
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The detailed route has been published on the Dakar website:

DAKAR 2011: CRESCENDO

For its third edition on the South American continent, the Dakar will be continuing its exploration northwards of Argentina and Chile. The balance between the difficult and less difficult sections has also been revised to test the riders, drivers and crews a little more on the first part of the route. After the rest day, the competitors will be getting to grips with extreme endurance racing, with a sequence of decisive stages, likely to rock the established order right up to the day before the finish in Buenos Aires.

David Castera, Dakar sporting director: “A great satisfaction has been the possibility to discover new regions by heading a little further north. This journey to the very limits of the two countries has contributed to the development of a dense and varied route. The state of play at the half-way point should be encouraging for many amateurs, but the return towards Buenos Aires looks challenging with four stages in which all the difficulties imaginable in the Atacama Desert are brought together. During the reconnaissances, my personal favourite was the landscapes that look like they come straight out of a western which we will be crossing on the Chilecito to San Juan stage. I reckon that the competitors will also be in a state of wonderment”.


Saturday, 1st January > Leg 1: Buenos Aires - Victoria

New Year’s Day the old way

Road section, 377 km

The Dakar will be respecting the tradition of the first editions, which systematically started on 1st January at place de la Concorde in Paris. This time, the competitors will indeed be passing an obelisk, yet it is the one on the Avenue of 9th July in Buenos Aires, before heading for Victoria, along a road section. The stop-watches will not be ticking for this day of meeting the Argentinean crowds. However, after this first section of the route, the competitors will be setting up for the night in the bivouac.


Sunday, 2nd January > Leg 1: Victoria - Cordoba

Engines heating up

Bikes - Quads
Road section, 566 km
Special, 192 km

Cars - Trucks
Road section, 566 km
Special, 222 km

Most of the journey will have been made the day before, but the road section to the starting line of the first special stage is still long. Once the competitors have got down to the nitty-gritty, their engines will start to heat up along a very quick portion. They will need to be more and more technically proficient on a route that then becomes mountainous. In order to limit the amount of overtaking on narrow tracks, a special route has been drawn up for bikes and quads in the middle of the stage.


Monday, 3rd January > Leg 2: Cordoba - San Miguel de Tucuman

Feels like the bush

Bikes - Quads
Road section, 440 km
Special, 300 km

Cars - Trucks
Road section, 440 km
Special, 324 km

For this stage entirely covering new ground, the competitors’ compass bearings will be set to the north, leading the rally into a backdrop of forest which will remind some observers of bush landscapes. During part of the day, the bikes and quads will again be separated from the cars and trucks. The acrobats on two wheels will have a field day on an old track where jumps are plentiful and sometimes spectacular. In the cockpits of the cars, the drivers can also expect a bumpy ride: endless hops and bounds as well as blind corners will be on the menu.


Tuesday, 4th January > Leg 3: San Miguel de Tucuman - San Salvador de Jujuy

Red and green

Bikes - Quads
Road section, 231 km
Special, 521 km

Cars
Road section, 231 km
Special, 500 km

Trucks
Road section, 408 km
Special, 226 km

To reach Jujuy, the special stage has been split into two parts, separated by a neutralised section. On the first part, the bikers will again be racing on their own track, plunging into the desert canyons where the red of the sand and cliffs is the dominant colour. There is a striking contrast with the second timed portion: the race moves to earthen tracks and the vehicles will disappear into thick green forest. The trucks have been excused from this challenge, deemed too dangerous for the windscreens which are at the same level as tree branches.


Wednesday, 5th January > Leg 4: San Salvador de Jujuy - Calama

The summit of the rally

Road section, 554 km
Special, 207 km

The Dakar leaves Argentina provisionally to cross the Andes mountain range via the Paso de Jama pass. To reach this point, the climb will start during the night. Once they have crossed the border, the crews will ascend to an altitude of 4,800 metres, i.e. the same height as Mont-Blanc, without crampons or ice-picks! In sporting terms, the arrival in Chile also heralds the entrance to the Atacama Desert and the first off-track racing of the rally. The start of the relatively short special stage will take place at 3,300 metres. At this point, the vehicles will have to handle stony terrain as the dunes approach.


Thursday, 6th January > Leg 5: Calama - Iquique

Full throttle

Road section, 36 km
Special, 423 km

Full speed ahead! On this complete special, the riders and drivers will have to deal with a variety of terrains which each demand a special type of driving or riding. After a slow start on rocky, bad tracks, the crossing of a “salar” will also bring the average speed down: this section measuring just a handful of kilometres will keep the riders and drivers busy for about one hour. However, the day’s finish will take place on wide open off-track terrain over around one hundred kilometres. The festival of dunes is rounded off by the descent to Iquique, which promises a whole bag of thrills to all thrill-seekers. Opposite the sea, the competitors will descend a 2.3-km slope, at an average gradient of 32 %!


Friday, 7th January > Leg 6: Iquique - Arica

“Guadal” as the locals say…

Road section, 265 km
Special, 456 km

The exploration of the Atacama Desert this year brings the Dakar participants to Arica, the last town before the Peruvian border. For this large slice of desert before the rest day, the menu is full of dunes, whose sizes increase as the day passes by. But throughout the special stage, the riders and drivers will experience an alternation of sensations. After surfing on the dunes, most of them will get to grips with the unavoidable zones of fesh-fesh, or “guadal” as they are known in this part of the world. For the section of slaloming between dust and dry grass, patience is the competitors’ best ally.


Sunday, 9th January > Leg 7: Arica - Antofagasta

A dive into the Pacific Ocean

Bikes-Quads
Road section, 208 km
Special, 631 km

Cars-Trucks
Road section, 208 km
Special, 611 km

The competitors will get back to business with the longest special stage of the rally, which marks the start of a very selective sequence. Two timed sections will be on the menu, with a section of two halves for the morning. The bikers will have to tackle an endurance type route lasting for around forty kilometres. Even the most physically fit will be exhausted by this excursion through the canyons. The finish of this first portion will take place on the ocean’s shores, as the vehicles dive down from the dunes along an especially steep slope towards the finish. The tracks of the second section are quicker and the riders and drivers will no doubt cross the finishing line of the special stage to applause at the racing track.



Monday, 10th January > Leg 8: Antofagasta - Copiapo

Three stages in one

Road section, 268 km
Special, 508 km

The three different phases of the day are likely to give rise to difficulties that will have a knock on effect. The utmost care is therefore recommended for handling the subtleties of navigation at the start of the special stage. In the immense open spaces of Chile, the competitors will have to “jump” from valley to valley: landmarks are rare and it is easy to get confused. Making up any time lost will be a dangerous task on the old mine tracks in the middle of the day’s route. Most importantly, a long sandy zone is located at the end of the stage. It will require a very clear head, so it is better to tackle it by day-light rather than with headlights on.


Tuesday, 11th January > Leg 9: Copiapo - Copiapo

Shovels and sand ladders

Link, 35 km
Special, 235 km

If the mileage for the day’s proceedings is taken in isolation, the Copiapo-Copiapo loop could pass for a quiet stroll in the desert. Nonetheless it may happen that for many the outcome of the rally could go a long way to being decided in the majestic dunes that dominate this stage. In some places, the depth of the dips formed by the mountains of sand could condemn those who wander astray in them to an endless series of manoeuvres. During this day full of traps, there is a lot to lose… but also much to be won for those who are experts at crossing dunes. The most elementary advice on deflating tyres is probably the most valuable to follow. To add further spice to this stage, the bikers will set off in a grouped start, in rows of ten for the leading riders then in rows of 20.


Wednesday, 12th January > Leg 10: Copiapo - Chilecito

Back at Fiambala

Road section, 686 km
Special, 176 km

The competitors will once again become mountaineers to cross the Andes mountain range. They should also make sure to take a camera to immortalise their journey along the road section on route 60, after crossing the border at the Paso San Francisco pass. After these moments of freshness and relaxation, the riders and drivers should expect heat shock. During this season, it is always very hot in the white dunes of Fiambala. The visit will be shorter than in previous years, but after ten days of racing, this section can in particular prove to be decisive for amateurs who start to show signs of tiredness.


Thursday, 13th January > Leg 11: Chilecito - San Juan

Once upon a time in the Andes…
Road section, 164 km
Special, 622 km

The country remains the same, but the competitors will genuinely have the impression of entering a new land. The foothills of the Andes sometimes take on a far west appearance, and this is indeed the case for the fabulous canyons in the first timed sector. A little tune by Ennio Morricone would be a perfect sound-track to the sandier backdrop of the second portion, where the competitors will navigate between fairy chimneys. In spite of appearances, it is not a cinema setting: the competitors will have to remain focused and on form for more than 600 kilometres to conserve the benefits of the efforts they have made up to this point.


Friday, 14th January > Leg 12: San Juan - Cordoba

Now its the turn of the big boys

Bikes-Quads-Cars
Link, 123 km
Special, 555 km

Trucks
Link, 349 km
Special, 266 km

The final battle for the title will take place in broad day-light for the trucks, which will have a head start, exceptionally kicking off proceedings for this stage. For the rest, the length of this penultimate stage requires caution, especially over the first still sandy 100 kilometres. Since the gaps are sometimes tiny between the quickest drivers and riders, a lot can still change at this stage of the race.

Saturday, 15th January > Leg 13: Cordoba - Buenos Aires

Show time

Link, 645 km
Special, 181 km

This is a stage for relaxing for most of the competitors who will take starter’s orders in Cordoba. There may be the chance of stealing one or two places for some, or a long route to overcome with a sore wrist or knee for others. These are all good reasons for remaining highly concentrated. The final short and quick special stage of the Dakar 2011 will finish at the Baradero racing track where a great show and thrills are guaranteed...

Phew!

Jx
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Old 11-25-2010, 07:38 PM   #308
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Go Jenny Go!!
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Old 11-26-2010, 01:01 AM   #309
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My appologies Jenny just getting to read this

Love the build and planning aspect of this "once in a lifetime ride" have to say I thoroughly enjoyed your previous reports and know you are a gritty person and will give it all you got!

Met you on the Brechfast ride in 2008, think you took a fancy to the Gmx tank on my Fasteddy cr??

We discust the merits of the xr650r at the time but can honestly say the wr450 you have is truly stunning!! ...and best for the job in hand

Best wishes to Si Pavey and Craig Bounds also participating

from all at http://southwalestrailrider.forumotion.net/index.htm

Rich.
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Old 11-26-2010, 01:39 AM   #310
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Jen,
what are your plans to cope with the fuel/elevation situation?
At the Sertoes, Neil had quite some problems with the South American ethanol content until he got the jetting right. And at last year's Dakaro, even the top riders struggled with boiling fuel at higher elevations. I remember Coma blowing into the tank vent tubes to pressurize the fuel and stop it from boiling.
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Old 11-26-2010, 03:25 AM   #311
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Wow, that bike turned out gorgeous! A job well done!!
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Old 11-26-2010, 03:35 AM   #312
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schattat
Sounds like you should decrease your wheel circumference then! Stock ICOs have a wheel setting of 220cm, but a brand new Michelin Desert only has 216cm, so every revolution you're adding 4cm!
The ICO's have an AutoCal function that take care of this problem, but I've never really understood how it actually "knows" when to correct and when not to (say I've taken a wrong turn, have to travel back then reset my trip?). Somebody care to clear that up for me (Cummo perhaps)?
The Autocal works by you changing the distance each time to match the route sheet. After a few times the ICO adjusts to those inputs. I think it's designed to ignore the first couple of times for when you take a wrong turn.
Lots of people don't like it, but I think it's great.
It takes into account variations between whatever vehicles the route sheet maker was in. I noticed I got mine spot on for the first couple of days in the Alta Turia, but on the 3rd it went out of wack. Turned out it was an old sheet they reused, done in a different vehicle. After the first few corners I was good to go again. Others just had to put up with the discrepancies, or muck around with their wheel diameter settings.
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Old 11-26-2010, 06:26 AM   #313
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By the way Jenny, did you get a chance to weigh the bike once it was completed?
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Old 11-26-2010, 06:32 AM   #314
JMo (& piglet) OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walnutwhip
My appologies Jenny just getting to read this

Love the build and planning aspect of this "once in a lifetime ride" have to say I thoroughly enjoyed your previous reports and know you are a gritty person and will give it all you got!

Met you on the Brechfast ride in 2008, think you took a fancy to the Gmx tank on my Fasteddy cr??

We discust the merits of the xr650r at the time but can honestly say the wr450 you have is truly stunning!! ...and best for the job in hand

Best wishes to Si Pavey and Craig Bounds also participating

from all at http://southwalestrailrider.forumotion.net/index.htm

Rich.
Hey Rich - of course, how could I forget - we had quite a day out there didn't we?! Thanks to all you guys for your support, and I'll be sure to pass on you well wished to Si and Craig - Patsy is supporting Craig this year (he's also on a WR450) and carrying spare tyres and mousses for Si, so the 'Welsh' contingent are likely to be hanging out most nights I imagine!

Feel free to link the SWTR website to here, and I'll do my best to keep you all informed during the event itself!

J xx
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Old 11-26-2010, 06:43 AM   #315
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flood
Jen,
what are your plans to cope with the fuel/elevation situation?
At the Sertoes, Neil had quite some problems with the South American ethanol content until he got the jetting right. And at last year's Dakaro, even the top riders struggled with boiling fuel at higher elevations. I remember Coma blowing into the tank vent tubes to pressurize the fuel and stop it from boiling.
Ah yes, the million dollar question! For those reading who didn't see the Dakar thread last January, there was a particular day (day 3) that riders had all sorts of problems... Initially it was suggested that the last fuel station before the start of he special may have had contaminated fuel, but some riders suffered and some didn't, and the problems were spread throughout the field, not just the second half for example...

Anyway, it seems the primary culprit was less bad fuel (although the Argentinean octane/quality may have been a little below par, not helping things), rather fuel starvation and vaporization at the higher altitudes.

Together with longer days, the main difference with the South American Dakar (compared to Africa) is it has a far more varied altitude - in Africa, once you are over the Atlas mountains, you are never much more than a few thousand feet above sea level, whereas in SA, you cross the Andes at over 15,000ft, and are regularly racing at 8000-10,000 ft (around 3000 metres).

The short answer to Flood's question is, I don't know...!

Tamsin didn't change her jetting at all on the WR in SA, and seemed to manage ok, although the bike is obviously running richer at higher altitude.

The 'full-power' spec of the WR is a 175 main jet, and I've also got a 168 and the stock 160 with me - so if I have problems, then we can change the jet size for the higher days, but to be honest, I'd rather not feck about with the carb unless I really have too. The bike is running very sweetly at the moment, and I don't like to disturb it!

Jx
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