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Old 09-24-2010, 05:21 PM   #46
GSJon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiTown
Maybe I'd be a good MC tech with some proper training.


The problem with that is I make much more $ for my time as a freelance video technician that a motorcycle tech ever could, which allows me to play much more than I work... I make just enough to support my habit....
But then again, maybe I could help Chicago BMW turn over a new leaf and have some good customer service, or at the very least install the right parts!
This would be nice, please!
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Old 09-26-2010, 01:06 AM   #47
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Amazing Post - www.mkride.com

Hello,

My name is Ryan Pyle. I am currently making a documentary film about riding a motorcycle around China. I burned my clutch out in Tibet in some heavy sand and was able to repair my motorcycle using this posting. Many thanks.

Ryan Pyle
www.mkride.com
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Old 09-26-2010, 08:49 AM   #48
JRWooden
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Maybe it is not worth messing with since you can't (yet?) buy single plates, but have those of you that have toasted the clutch seen pretty even wear on all the plates or did it seem to be concentrated to the inside or ???

Maybe it's stupid ... but I'm wondering if one "kit" of parts might reasonably rebuild a clutch twice if in a tight or distant spot. Unless badly overheated I would think the same springs could be used again (once you've got a set of the longer ones installed) saving a bit of space.
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Old 09-27-2010, 09:35 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanjpyle
Hello,

My name is Ryan Pyle. I am currently making a documentary film about riding a motorcycle around China. I burned my clutch out in Tibet in some heavy sand and was able to repair my motorcycle using this posting. Many thanks.

Ryan Pyle
www.mkride.com

Awesome!
I mean, the work of yours I can see is awesome....
Glad we could be of assistance.
Ride on!





JR,
Only the pad on the outside looked worn, and after a similar suggestion from a good BMW source, I believe you are correct.
There's no reason why you couldn't squeeze more miles out of a clutch in a pinch by rotating the worn pad to the middle of the group. At least if your clutch looked like mine and wasn't totally destroyed. If I'd have known while on the TAT, that's exactly what I would have done.

Homework Assignment:

Next lucky soul who wears their clutch try rotating the pads to see how well it works, and report back please.


If I still had my old one I'd swap them back out for ADV sake, but it's long gone, far, far away.
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Old 10-10-2010, 05:50 AM   #50
JRWooden
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Just found this article with some tips on rebuilding used clutches here:

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=922634

I have never thought about "easing" the corners of the engagement tangs on the friction discs (figure 6) but if done only a very modest amount it does seem that it would improve the life of the clutch basket ... esp. if you are going thru a lot of clutches ...
and that clutch basket/housing is $600
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Old 10-19-2010, 09:03 AM   #51
MCMXCIVRS
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Ordered the kit and the gasket yesterday, so I'll be replacing my clutch in a couple weeks when it all arrives.

The good news is, it was cheaper from my local dealer here in Canada, than the prices listed on Max BMW's site. Not by much, just a couple dollars, but with the exchange (almost at par, but not quite) and shipping, buying local saves me enough for a case of celebratory refreshments for the post replacement party.

Now I just need to do something with the front fender to keep the damn mud from packing up in it and making me burn the new clutch out.
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:27 PM   #52
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Did the job earlier this week. Hell, I worked harder and longer burning it out in that mud hole.
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:52 PM   #53
JRWooden
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Yeah... and you were farther away from the refrig. too....

Seriously it does seem a pretty easy job...
Were your plates pretty evenly worn, or was the wear concentrated to the outer (?) discs?
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Old 11-01-2010, 06:56 AM   #54
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Low fender

Get a 19" front rim. Lots of space under the fender...
Put a street tire on it and you'll never go offroad and burn a clutch again.




Quote:
Originally Posted by MCMXCIVRS
Did the job earlier this week. Hell, I worked harder and longer burning it out in that mud hole.
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Old 11-01-2010, 08:29 AM   #55
MCMXCIVRS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden
Yeah... and you were farther away from the refrig. too....

Seriously it does seem a pretty easy job...
Were your plates pretty evenly worn, or was the wear concentrated to the outer (?) discs?
I didn't measure the wear on the plates, but they were all pretty blackened. I'll have to go examine the stack again to see where the most wear was. The clutch was totally shot and would not even move the bike it was slipping so badly.

I'm currently doing a high fender conversion to prevent future mud jams on the front wheel.
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:33 PM   #56
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I measured all the plates and the wear is quite consistant on all of them. The friction plates were all in the range of 0.130" - 0.132" except the outermost one wich was 0.135". All the steel plates were in the range of 0.058" - 0.059".

Edit: I checked the min thickness for the friction plates, its 3.4mm ( 0.1338") so I got more than my allowable of use out of the clutch. Little wonder it was slipping.

MCMXCIVRS screwed with this post 11-01-2010 at 03:43 PM
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:54 PM   #57
JRWooden
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Thanks ...
Based on your experience it dos not sound likely that you can get two rebuilds out of one "kit" ...
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Old 11-01-2010, 05:40 PM   #58
Schlug
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobo1167
Under the cover on the upper left is a void, dry, hot, secret, big enough to smuggle diamonds. And since this cover is so easy to get off.........


I scare myself when I think about how if a guy just fell over on the correct pointy rock, that hit the cover in the right spot, there could be serious day spoiling carnage.

bobo
No no my friend. This is why all of you should always have JB weld or aluminum epoxy or something of the sort in your tool kit. Always, no matter how easy the trail seems. Even a dirt road with the right rock can smash through your case. And this is why you have you JB weld in the toolkit which you always carry. You've already noted that you won't lose enough oil to worry about, depending on how it lands and where it gets smashed. If you can find the parts you can JB weld them together and it will work a treat. In some instances riders have left their repairs intact for the remainder of the riding season since it held so well. In the case when you can't find all the pieces or the pieces are too small to handle, you'll turn to your beer cans. This is why Gaspipe recommends that, when riding Baja, you carry your JB Weld and drink a lot of beer. You can always use the aluminum to fashion a makeshift case.

you're welcome.
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:48 PM   #59
EnderTheX
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I always carry half a stik on my longer rides...




EDIT: Make you you clean any gasoline or oil residue from the area as well as you can!!!!! JB weld doesn't do so hot if it is trying to set in contact with a solvent....

(Think pure alcohol, alcohol wipes (baby wipes), or maybe some bourbon in a pinch lol)
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Old 11-01-2010, 07:59 PM   #60
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Thanks Bobby, what would we do without you and Gaspipe?


I've had good luck with JB fixing a huge hole in the transmission of a rental car I decided to DS drive on Colorado...

No ADV rider should leave home without a tube, luckily I haven't needed it on my bike. Yet.


I wonder, in a real pinch (like in Africa) if you could (painstakingly) "rebuild" the two outer clutchplates pads with JB weld....





MCMXCIVRS,
Back on topic, it seems that not all clutches burn up the same... go figure.

Too bad I had no way to measure my plates, but I know and from the pictures the two outer ones were very worn, and the center ones looked fine. As why I could still ride the bike, just couldn't give it too much throttle...

Thanks for adding to the information pool!
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