ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-22-2010, 02:48 PM   #76
AKoffroader
Adventurer
 
AKoffroader's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Chugiak Alaska
Oddometer: 489
Thanks

Thank you HF for taking the time to post the installation of your Athena 290 kit as well as valve adjustment procedure.

It would be interesting to see a Dyno run with the new kit since you already have a baseline Dyno report of stock as well as modified with Q4 pipe, airbox mod, and FMF controller.

Take care,

AK Greg
__________________
2006 Yamaha TW200
2008 Yamaha WR250R
2008 Suzuki DR650
2012 Yamaha XT1200Z
1978 Yamaha TT500
AKoffroader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2010, 07:06 PM   #77
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
Thank you all, for the kind comments & encouragement. Its a lot of work to post this up. I'm glad you find it enjoyable & educational. I've learned a lot myself, during this project. And still learning...

Yes, I'm most definitely planning to make a Dyno Run #3. The saga continues!

HF
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2010, 09:07 PM   #78
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
Ok...so here comes the mighty valve adjustment. Let's do it while I've got this thing in my hands:



This motor has Lifters covering the 4 valve tops....shiny chrome cylinders that are hollow on the inside. Just pull one straight upward & out gently like this:



If you can't get ahold of it, just use a magnet to grab the top of it and lift gently. Carefully turn it over and you will find a miniature hockey puck stuck to the bottom side of the Lifter.



Its being held by oil stiction (adhesion). I then plucked it out of there using my magnet, again.



This little metal hockey puck is the "ShimPad". Some call it "Shim". Others call it "Pad". So, I call it ShimPad. Not bad, eh? I just now made that up!



WR250R...$5,895.

Nice Garage to keep it in....$15,352.

Dinky little 'ol fashioned ShimPad........Priceless!

Don't lose it, your bike won't run without it.


And just so you know, it goes back in place right here on top of the valve for reinstallation:



Not back into the bottom side of the Lifter. That's not a recessed groove holding it in the underside of the Lifter. That's just the ShimPad outline in the oil film there. However, there is a recessed spot on top of the valve in the photo above. Line up the ShimPad carefully and press it into place. It kind of snaps in lightly. Make certain its not crooked, but flush and smooth across the top, in alignment with the surroundings. Also, face your ShimPad # upward, so it doesn't get worn away by the valve action.

These particular ShimPads measure 7.5 mm in diameter. And, I've discovered that's the same one used in the WR250F. The motorcycle shop won't have any ShimPads for the WR250R (if you ask....its a special order item), but they will amazingly have LOTS of ShimPads for the WR250F. You figure it out...



The number etched on the ShimPad is (supposed to be) the thickness in millimeters. But Japs apparently hate the Dewey Decimal system, so they refuse to use decimal points. Example: the one in my hand says "195" which means its really "1.95 mm" thickness. See for yourself:



Someday....I'm gonna buy my a real English bike (like a Triumph) just because the Japs keep screwing with our minds, this way.

I strongly suggest you always measure the Shimpad (both diameter and thickness) to be certain. Don't just blindly trust the # or especially the guy behind the counter to get it right. He's not the one that has to redo all the work, if its wrong. The Motorcycle Shop usually has a digital caliper (like the one I'm using) behind the desk. So harass them if you must, but make them measure right before your eyes.

But, what do you buy &/or swap out for? A very good question. And you better not be drinking any beer when you're trying to figure it out.

I laid out all my lifters and ShimPads in order as they came out of the motor. CAUTION: Don't mix them up. Put the exact same Lifter onto the exact same valve it came from. The ShimPads can be interchanged....if they fit correctly.



And, I'm about to write down the measurements I took for each valve clearance, respectively....on the paper to the right. Guess I should have taken this photo later. But just use your imagination (again) if you still have one after this long-winded article.

I'm going to walk you thru one example of one valve. The same procedure works for each one.

Right Intake Valve:

Clearance measurement = 0.13 mm

Spec range = 0.13 - 0.20 mm

I want to increase the amount of valve clearance (make it bigger). I want to move toward the upper limit (closer to 0.20 mm without busting it)

My current ShimPad for that valve is a #195 (or 1.95 mm thickness)

The motorcycle shop seems to only sell ShimPads in 0.05 mm increments (like 185, 190, 195, & so on). So, I have to select the next smaller ShimPad that can be used which would not cause the clearance gap to break the 0.20 mm upper limit.

This is where it often gets confusing. Smaller means bigger. Less means more. And vice versa.

I select a #190 for this task. The 1.90 mm ShimPad is 0.05 mm smaller thickness than the #195.

So, that will increase my valve clearance by 0.05 mm (as I slip in the thinner ShimPad).

My new clearance gap should measure 0.13 + 0.05 = 0.18 mm

I cannot use the next smaller ShimPad, as it would increase the gap beyond spec for the Intake Valve.

And, I can attest that it did indeed measure 0.18 mm gap upon reinstall. You will get to see that photo later on.

You can basically do the same adjustment, the same way, without tearing down your motor. I'll show you this procedure, with the motor completely assembled in the frame, a little later. But here's a teaser....



Those flexible magnet thingy-ma-jigs sure do come in handy for jobs like this.

Well, now you know! And its not so scary after all....is it?

HF

p.s. But hold your hats .... "scary" is just around the corner!
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com

HighFive screwed with this post 09-22-2010 at 09:14 PM
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 04:38 AM   #79
vwsandman
Gnarly Adventurer
 
vwsandman's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Racine, WI
Oddometer: 259
Wink Micrometer needed

HF, for the future when doing valve adjustments, the digital calipers will work in a pinch, but generally do not have the range nor the precision for this work. For a little more money a small digital micrometer is THE way to go. Much more precise for measuring those shims, especially when they have been in there for 26,000 miles and no longer have any numbers on them...It was a must have when I did my FZ1, I had 20 of those little buggers to check and maybe three or four had legibal numbers on them.

Thanks again for the pics!
__________________
Ivan Sandoval
https://sites.google.com/site/sandmanparts/ ADV Vendor thread:http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=537271 and now T-shirts!: https://www.booster.com/sandmanparts
Home of The Original WR250R/X Case Saver/Freedom Sprocket Guard Kit
vwsandman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 05:11 AM   #80
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
Let's look at how all the numbers worked out through my adjustments.

For my own version of organized shorthand, I'm going to create some ratios. This is just something I made up (right now) to help you visualize what is happening.

Clearance measurement / ShimPad #

This will be an easy way to keep track of how I changed things...before vs. after. Always be mindful of the correct valve spec range, which is this:

Intake Valves: 0.13 - 0.20 mm

Exhaust Valves: 0.23 - 0.30 mm


Alright, here's what I did to it...

Left Intake
Old 0.13 / 198
New 0.16 / 195

Right Intake
Old 0.13 / 195
New 0.18 / 190

Left Exhaust
Old 0.23 / 185
New 0.28 / 180

Right Exhaust
Old 0.23 / 186
New 0.29 / 180


You'll notice the factory has used some 0.01 mm increments in the ShimPads. Apparently, they get to use sizes that we can't. Must be some international consumer protection law against that, no doubt.

So, that kind of screws with the numbers a bit. The valves that have ShimPads on .05 mm increments are pretty easy to resolve. But the odd balls force you to make a harder decision. Do you want to move it a little or a lot....you kind of fall in-between two options. And, you can see what I did by following the numbers.

I hope this makes sense to you, and provides a good visual of the adjustment. Should I have left them on the edge at the lower spec as I found them? Maybe....if I wanted absolute maximum power possible (from valve settings with the stock camshafts)....and if I knew they were not wearing down at all.

I am hoping the Athena Big Bore provides me enough extra punch that renders this "valve setting for max power" question meaningless....as a practical matter. I'm just looking to fatten my power band a good bit everywhere. Make the bike even MORE FUN to ride ANYWHERE. The goal of this project is not to wring every last ounce of HP I can from this mod. Someone already beat me to that with a Turbo Charger (which you can see on YouTube....Ho-chi-momma!).

So, if I do this right, I won't have to even think about adjusting my valves again, for a long, long time. Especially if the high mileage motors are discovered to be exactly the same valve settings as mine (0.13 IN & 0.23 EX) when they pop the cover. Time will tell, and I hope they will report their findings in this Thread for everyone to see.

If & when that happens, I might go back and tighten my valve clearance to where it was originally. I donno....its not a big deal either way to me. Sleeping good at night IS a big deal. Last night, I slept like an old lazy houndog, by the fire on a cold winter night! Well....except its still freakin hot as summer, here. And my air conditioner stopped working. And....aah nevermind.

HF
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com

HighFive screwed with this post 09-23-2010 at 05:35 AM
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 05:20 AM   #81
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwsandman
HF, for the future when doing valve adjustments, the digital calipers will work in a pinch, but generally do not have the range nor the precision for this work. For a little more money a small digital micrometer is THE way to go.
Most definitely Agreed, Sandman. I reeeeally would like to have one of those nicer gizmos.

But alas, I spent all my money on this project (over $1,100 ) just for the good of the Collective.

Maybe somebody will send me one for Christmas....

HF


By the way, I really love my VWSANDMAN CASE SAVER & SPROCKET GUARD! What a fantastic piece of workmanship. Pure quality. These things will last longer than I will, no doubt about it. Thank you for making them so well. Great design. It should be OEM issue.
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 07:54 AM   #82
motoman250f
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Oddometer: 434
HF, can you say how many miles your rr has on it? It would be interesting to check the piston/cyl clearance and compare that to the service limit. That would give us an Idea of how long the stock pistons should last on one of these.
Your description of the power problem on your wrr reminds me of whats wrong with mine so I will be interested in your end conclusion. The real problem in my head is that I believe yamaha really knew what they were doing with their real tight piston/cyl clearance and their 2 compression ring plan compared to only one on the athena.
I'm afraid that the athena kit rings wouldn't last near as long as the stock ones with additional compression and less ring sealing. Can anybody comment on this? My gut tells me the wrr in stock form will be a 40,000 mile top end and the athena will only run 20,000. Someone tell me the athena rings are much stronger and will last as long so I can order this kit! Thanks fore the information and entertainment.
Oh yeah, what's the piston/cyl clearance on the athena new??
motoman250f is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 08:00 AM   #83
kawagumby
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Location: California
Oddometer: 769
BTW, if you dislike having to run around trying to get the right shim, hotcams sells a shim kit with all the sizes, one size fits a lot of different jap bikes, including all the WR's. I bought one from RMMCATV for about 80 bucks.
__________________
the true tragedy of our times -
human overpopulation is destroying the 2-stroke
kawagumby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 08:18 AM   #84
vwsandman
Gnarly Adventurer
 
vwsandman's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Racine, WI
Oddometer: 259
Thumb Micrometer

Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFive

By the way, I really love my VWSANDMAN CASE SAVER & SPROCKET GUARD! What a fantastic piece of workmanship. Pure quality. These things will last longer than I will, no doubt about it. Thank you for making them so well. Great design. It should be OEM issue.
You are more than welcome!

Harbor Freight sells a half way decent digital micrometer for $34.99 and then you can always use one of the 20% off coupons... here is a link:

http://www.harborfreight.com/digital...ter-98485.html

Pretty sure that is the one I have and it saved my azz when I did my FZ1.

You can always spend more...but for occasional use this one should be good enough for most of us.
__________________
Ivan Sandoval
https://sites.google.com/site/sandmanparts/ ADV Vendor thread:http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=537271 and now T-shirts!: https://www.booster.com/sandmanparts
Home of The Original WR250R/X Case Saver/Freedom Sprocket Guard Kit
vwsandman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 05:29 PM   #85
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
Quote:
Originally Posted by motoman250f
HF, can you say how many miles your rr has on it?

My gut tells me the wrr in stock form will be a 40,000 mile top end and the athena will only run 20,000.

Oh yeah, what's the piston/cyl clearance on the athena new??
Hey...are you "The" Motoman, or just "a" motoman? I've had terrific results using the Motoman break-in procedure.

I had about 7,700 miles on my WRR when I started the swap. Don't know about the gap comparisons. Maybe the next guy can do that & post it up. But, I'm not sure how valid a comparison between a used stock kit and a brand new Athena kit would be. Seems you need to put similar mileage on the Athena, then measure it for comparison sake.

I'll be elated if I get 20,000 miles of useage from the first set of piston & rings. That would be a few years of good, hard riding for me (on this particular bike), because I have others for my ultra long duties. Especially if the performance is significantly enhanced.



Quote:
Originally Posted by kawagumby
BTW, hotcams sells a shim kit with all the sizes, one size fits a lot of different jap bikes, including all the WR's. I bought one from RMMCATV for about 80 bucks.
Thanks, kawagumby! I might have to get me one of those, because you're right. I usually end up running between multiple shops to find all the shim sizes that I need. Why do they always seem to have LOTS of everything BUT the ones I need?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vwsandman
You are more than welcome!

Harbor Freight sells a half way decent digital micrometer for $34.99 and then you can always use one of the 20% off coupons... here is a link:

http://www.harborfreight.com/digital...ter-98485.html
Does this mean I shouldn't be expecting one for Christmas....from anybody?

HF
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 07:55 PM   #86
cyborg
Potius Sero Quam Numquam
 
cyborg's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: Pacific NorthWet
Oddometer: 4,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwsandman
You are more than welcome!

Harbor Freight sells a half way decent digital micrometer for $34.99 and then you can always use one of the 20% off coupons... here is a link:

http://www.harborfreight.com/digital...ter-98485.html

Pretty sure that is the one I have and it saved my azz when I did my FZ1.

You can always spend more...but for occasional use this one should be good enough for most of us.
I got one of those cheapie micrometers, but it never seemed to take the same measument twice or go back to zero reliably. I went back to my Mitutoyo calipers which are accurate 4 decimal place and higher quality and they work fine for the several bikes I do valves on.



I will eventually pony-up for a good micrometer one of these days.
cyborg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 08:11 PM   #87
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
Time to put the new jewels in the safe! Here's the Athena piston with rings installed. No, it doesn't come that way...you have to put them on yourself. But, the Athena kit does come with everything you need, including all the gaskets. Its truly a complete kit.



This piston has two ring grooves. The upper groove is for the Compression Ring, and the lower groove (a little wider) is for the 3-piece Oil Ring set. The Athena instructions were decent enough, except they weren't very detailed about HOW to assemble the 3 pieces of oil ring. So, I made a wild guess that the the single "beaded" ring needed to be sandwiched between the two uber-thin flat rings and placed into that lower groove....because they sure weren't gonna fit in the top slot. Krabill thought maybe something else, so after some debate we settled it with a quick match of "Paper, Scissors, Rock". I won, so that's how we put it together.

The instructions are pretty good for where to position the ring gaps. Basically, stagger them out (all 4 ring gaps involved) so that none of the ring gaps are close to being aligned with one another. Just follow the instructions there. Lots of people struggle with placing the rings over the piston and into the grooves. I'm not sure why. It really doesn't require a special tool "ring spreader". Just start one edge of the ring in the groove, and gently walk it around at an angle until you get to the other end. Just don't over stretch (force open) the ring too much, and crack or break it.

I seem to be missing about three photos at this point. I didn't take one of the ring installation, attaching the piston to the connecting rod, and wrestling the cylinder over the piston & rings. Hhhhmmmm......sorry about that. So, here's three more photos to make up for it. I took them this evening, just for you:







That last one there has a real fine name. Not Whitey, not Charlie, we call it "Krabill". Follows me everywhere around Rancho Highfive. I should put her up on the handlebars and see if she can ride!

Two of only three real challenges associated with this whole project come right here. Installing the wrist pin retaining clips into the piston is not an easy task. They are not snap rings, but rather just 3/4 circle, straight edge clips. Probably got some more "official" sounding name, but that's what I call them. These boogers are tough, hard to squeeze in, & hard to set into the groove inside the piston cavity. Someone else will have to take some photos and post them when they get to this procedure. Working together, the Krabill and I carefully pressed those clips into the groove using a screwdriver and a few bloody fingers.

First thing you do is set one clip into one side of the piston. Then, place the piston onto the top of the Connecting Rod. Slide the Wrist Pin through the piston & connecting rod slot. Then, install the remaining clip on the other side of the piston. Easier said than done, particularly because that clip wants to shoot out of that hole (when you slip off of it) and across the shop like a rifle bullet. Better have someone help you for this step and the cylinder installation. And, make sure you cover the open crankcase (beneath the piston) with rags, so that clip doesn't disappear down the dark hole. That would be bad....bad....really bad.

Sliding the cylinder over the piston and rings was another challenge for us two greenhorns. It took all we could muster between our four hands to get all those rings squeezed in while we ease the cylinder down over them. Ok....maybe it was more like "forced the cylinder down over them".....with some cussing and hammering. Same difference in the end, we got-r-done. But to be fair, it had us completely tied up with no free hands to take a photo of the process. Another thing for someone else to add to this Thread later, I reckon.

Ah-ha....photos again:



Don't forget to use a brand spanking new Base Gasket, and transfer that O-ring to the water jacket dowel spacer shown above.



Those big black sticks are guides for the camchain....to keep it from rubbing on the cylinder wall, I guess. And they are actually used to put tension on the camchain itself. The blessed little tensioner assembly (to come) pushes against one of those guides to put constant pressure against the camchain....more or less. So, you've got to fish those thingys through that big hole in the cylinder over on that side and pull the chain through too.

Now THIS is a pretty site:



Time to put the Head Assembly back on the stack:







Of course, use a torque wrench for all these anchor bolts and follow the the torquing pattern shown in the Service Manual. If you don't have one, use a criss-cross rotational pattern, and build up to the final torque setting slowly. Add a little more tension....go around the bases. Repeat. Repeat. Until you get to the final torque setting. Take your time with this as it is critically important to evenly anchor the head and cylinder together.....so as to avoid distortion.

HF

Next up....the most fun part of the whole job: setting the timing & camshaft tension. Woo Hoo ! ! ! !
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com

HighFive screwed with this post 09-23-2010 at 08:24 PM
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 09:03 PM   #88
Roam
If you want to
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: NoVA
Oddometer: 1,037
Thanks for all your great write ups.
__________________
http://www.twowheelsgood.net




Roam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 10:23 PM   #89
HighFive OP
Never Tap-Out
 
HighFive's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Okiehoma
Oddometer: 2,636
I'm sad to say, that I lost the Krabill at this point. He's a good mate. We always have a good time when we get together. It was uncanny how he showed up (unannounced) at the exact time I needed an extra pair of hands. Super kudos to the (original) Krabill for helping out, when it was needed most. My little friend, Krabill the chicken, wasn't quite as helpful as his namesake....during the rest of the day.

Now, I have to put the camshafts back into the Head.



Do this methodically, one at a time, weaseling them into position (lobes facing outward) underneath the camchain. Look closely at the timing marks on the sprocket. You should now know where they are supposed to be located (of which one is correct, and the other is not).

Mess with it....rotating the sprockets relative to one another, until all the marks align parallel to the top of the Head (with the Timing Mark aligned on the magneto, as well). Just like it was when we measured the valve clearance. NOTE: I've learned the hard way, its very helpful to pull all the slack from the camchain as you set the Exhaust camshaft into correct position first....pulling the extra chain slack toward the back of the motor (over the Intake sprocket). In other words, try to make the chain tight on the front side of the motor, and put all the slack on the back side of the motor (where the cam chain tensioner will be pressing on the chain guide). This helps prevent the cams from getting out of sync when the chain gets "tensioned up"....as the tensioner is released to do its business.

After the camshaft positions are set correctly, re-install the camshaft cover.



This is another item that requires a precise torquing pattern to exacting measurements. There are 8 bolts securing this cover. The criss-cross pattern begins with the 4 inner bolts, then moves to the 4 outer bolts. Its shown very well in the Service Manual.

Finally, the moment you've all been waiting for: Conquering The Beast from the Far East!



This is the camchain tensioner, and its a real special variety for the WRR. Unlike most automatic tensioners, this one does not have a simple ratchet catch and bolt release system. Nope, they got a "better idea" for this bad boy. Made it a bolt-less, hydraulic oil pressured, tensioner assembly. The Service Manual has a great sketch of this unique part, but a not so good description of exactly how to "reset" it.

The Manual indicates you simply squeeze the shaft into the housing....between your fingers.....while you twist the housing around the shaft to "wind it up" in some fashion. It acts like a threaded screw, in a sense. It takes simultaneous pressure (extreme pressure) and rotation to get the tensioner assembly to compress. But then, they are real vague on how to lock it in place using a retainer clip. I couldn't do it with my hands. Neither could the Krabill, at first. But before leaving, he gave it one more Incredible Hulk effort and got that thing locked & loaded...by hand! But, that didn't last long as I had to set and reset many more times while I worked out my camshaft timing.

I'll spare you all my pain & suffering, and just show you the method I finally concocted to make this task nearly effortless. Indeed, necessity is the Mother of all invention. Here is the super duper HF way to do it!



Using a pair of soft jaw inserts, put the cam-tensioner-from-hell into your vice and teach it a lesson!

Slowly turn the vise inward (squeeze it together) as you twist the housing around the shaft in a clockwise rotation. Look at this next photo very closely to see where the groove on the shaft aligns with a groove in the housing (which contains the retainer clip).





We are looking at the outer most groove on the end of the shaft. Don't mess with the inner groove & clip....no, no, no. You are only working with the one closest to the very end of the shaft. When that groove aligns with the groove & clip in the housing, Squeeze the clip together and continue holding it compressed in the shaft groove, while you slowly release pressure from the vise....letting the shaft come back out of the housing. As it does this, it will snag (pinch) the clip between the shaft and the housing....causing a log jam, of sorts. THAT is what holds this cam tensioner "Locked & Loaded".

Then, put it back into the motor, here, using the fresh new gaskets & copper washes provided with the Athena kit. (photo for position only....I realize tensioner is not reset in pic):





Next, say a prayer that you're timing will come out right and you won't have to take it all back off and do over.

I was fortunate to be blessed with many "do overs" over many days. Oh, you'll see why soon enough.


Now, with the camshafts properly aligned with all the timing marks correct (at top on the sprockets, and down below on the mag) press your hand tightly on top of the cam chain like this:



while you slowly rotate the motor counterclockwise like this:



until you start feeling resistance in the cam tensioner and it FIRES like a cannonball at 300 mph....to tighten up the camchain. If you don't keep your hand pressed firmly on the top of th chain, it will jump the sprockets when the tensioner is released and skip the Exhaust camshaft out of time, and you have to "Return to Go without collecting $200". That means you've got to start the whole process all over.

Many thanks for the valuable advice I received from both SVR700 and Machtig regarding this final challenge. They each gave me some excellent ideas on how to release this tensioner without jumping my timing off the mark. This was the most difficult challenge of the entire project....at least until I fully understood what was happening and how to fix it. Now, I've gotten pretty good at it, as I've performed it several times. However, it still doesn't work smoothly every single time. It can really try your patience. So, just relax and take your time.

How the Cam Tensioner releases: when you turn the motor counterclockwise, there is eventually pressure exerted against the long black skinny chain guide....which pushes against the end of the Tensioner shaft. That causes the shaft to push back into its housing slightly....just enough to let that retainer clip (the log jammed one) release into the housing groove recess. Voila....the log jam is removed and the shaft comes flying out of the housing (literally). Apparently there is some serious spring and or hydraulic oil pressure in that housing which forces that shaft to come outward and press against the chain guide....creating the necessary chain tension.

That's what I figured out, and I hope it didn't bore you to death!

When it all works perfectly, it comes out looking like this:



HF
__________________
'13 Husky TR650 Terra, '11 Husaberg FE390, '10 BMW F800GS, '12 BMW R1200GS
Terra-izing the CDR Bergs Over the Rainbow Texas or Bust!
Rocky Mountain HighFive The Other Side of Nowhere
Athena Big Bore Project WRRDualsport.com
HighFive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2010, 10:40 PM   #90
Jrmobb
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Jrmobb's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Bryce Canyon Utah
Oddometer: 211
One word.....Amazing! Good job man. I dont own a wr250r but some day I may and I will be loving this thread. Its people like you who help give encouragment to other who are sketchy about these kinda jobs

Its what makes this site the best!
__________________
09 Te510

Bikes of the past:
02 rm125, 96 rmx250, 01 drz400E, 07 drz400sm
02 ktm 640, 06 ttr125
Jrmobb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014