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Old 09-24-2010, 09:12 PM   #106
HighFive OP
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Back to the motor, its time to re-check the valve clearance and make sure the gaps are on target with what I expected (when I did the math).



Sure enough, this one is right on the money at 0.18 mm (if you can read that feeler gauge...bad focus, I know).



After double checking all my valve clearances, I can button up the valve cover and finish this install.

CAUTION: The two bolts securing the valve cover are anchored into threaded holes which are built into the soft aluminum camshaft cover.



The threads in these holes are VERY fragile and weak. Take extra precaution when both removing and reinstalling the two steel valve cover bolts, to prevent stripping the stupid, lightweight, aluminum threads in the receptacle. This cheap, lousy, aluminum thread anchor was surely concocted by the biggest mechanical ignoramus on the planet. Seems the cover should have 4 bolts (one on each corner) versus just two in the center....with soft aluminum threads, no less. But what do I know....??

You probably should use a brand new valve cover gasket, but I didn't. Just cleaned up the original gasket and put it back in place carefully. This piece goes on top of the Head Assembly and includes those trademark black rubber circles on both sides of the motor (near the top). That's all part of the chunky, rubbery, valve cover gasket. It lays flat on the Head, and stabs into a recessed groove on the valve cover. So, be very careful as you meticulously work your way completely around the Head, to ensure that gasket is seated in the groove correctly. You don't want anything twisted or pinched here, when you cinch it all up....to the whopping torque level of a mere 8 ft-lbs. Better use a 1/4" torque wrench for this duty...I did.

Next, put the spark plug back in the motor.



Why are we talking about something as basic as the spark plug cap in this big complex procedure? Because I've seen a lot of people fail to get their coil fully snapped down in place. This seal on the coil must be flush & tight with the edge of the valve cover. Don't be fooled by a preliminary "click" sound or feeling. Take a careful look around the side of the motor and make sure you see this seal locked down in this position (shown with screwdriver above). A coil that is not fully snapped into place, may well still fire the plug and get the bike running. But its likely to run poorly as the plug misfires from a loose connection with the coil. I've had at least one friend show up at my doorstep with his poorly running bike, thinking he had a fuel delivery problem (clogged carb, bad fuel, etc), when it turned out to simply be a loose coil connection just like this.

Here's another shot behind the motor which shows where the Starter blocks access to the Camchain Tensioner....and why I removed it (which was very easy to accomplish).



Now that the motor is finally all buttoned up, I have the challenge of lifting & rotating it back into proper place within the frame mounts. I tried lifting, pushing, & pulling. I wasn't getting anywhere by myself. So, I had to recruit another assistant....wth more muscle than 'Krabill the chicken'. Here's my newest bike mate:



Once I got the angle right, it worked like a breeze! I purposely only used two fingers to pump the hydraulic jack while I laughed out loud at that engine!

Re-installed & tightened all the frame bolts, the radiator, pipe, gear shifter, brake pedal, etc......in reverse order of how it was removed.

Now, let me jump ahead a little bit (for good reason). I did get the bike running, as you can see here:



She started right up on the 2nd turn of the crankshaft. Wow, I guess I set the valves and timing correctly after all.

Letting it idle, I carefully began studying every gasket sealed area that I had messed with...looking for leaks. This is a VERY important thing to do, before doing anything else.

And guess what? I had a huge leak out the back center of my valve cover....CRIKEY!

Something is wrong, and now I have to dig back into it to find out what I screwed up!

It happens...

HF

p.s. The motto just got changed to: "If it can happen to me, then it can happen to you too!"
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Old 09-24-2010, 09:34 PM   #107
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HF,

I continue to appreciate your attention to detail! Sounds like some real challenges you've sorted out for us. Yeah, I'm gettin' the bigbore bug. And I guarantee I'll be reading this thread again a couple of times before tearing into it!

Sorry to hear your cam cover gasket is/was givin' ya' grief... No doubt, ya' really wanted to ride it right then as anyone would, but good on ya' for looking for leaks. Disaster averted, hopefully, by finding it before running out of oil.

I'm following your excellent writeup with great interest!



Thanks again,

Artoo
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Old 09-24-2010, 09:51 PM   #108
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Dingweed and I dove into a twelve-pack of Tecate' and this:




Man, there's a lot of little screws and thingies.



.
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Old 09-25-2010, 04:21 AM   #109
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Aaah....geez! You're in a whole different league from me.

You've got one of those fancy bike lifts AND a full-time Helper that ain't a chicken!

No fair....

HF
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Old 09-25-2010, 05:48 AM   #110
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My Pain, Your Gain

STOP! Do NOT continue your project before reading this next post.

The Bad News is I have a little leak around my valve cover. Ok....more like a Humongous LEAK. Same difference to the motor (eventually).

The Good News is you're going to find out right here & now, if the Valve Cover can be removed for a valve check & adjustment with the engine all bolted up normally in the frame.

Step 1: Remove the seat (2 bolts)

Step 2: Remove the tank (3 bolts...for my Safari)

Step 3: Remove the radiator (3 bolts and loosen a few hose clamps)

Step 4: Remove the valve cover.....BINGO! That's it.







Golly...that was easy!

So, what's the catch? There's always a catch....right?

Yup, just one that I can tell.

TRICK: The secret is hiding right here:



Loosen this intake manifold to the max, so you can pull back on the fuel injection unit (as far as possible) to make a little extra room for the valve cover as you lift and twist the cover out in a clockwise motion. Yes, its a tight fit....very tight. But there is enough room to do it, no problem. Be patient, you'll get it. Then, you can easily check your valve clearance and make any adjustments required, following the same procedure I posted earlier.

So, what's up?

Hhhhmmmm....these valve cover anchor threads don't looks so good:





Let's take it off for a closer inspection:





Ugh...me got em problem! The threads on this back side look all boogered up. Did I use a 1/4" torque wrench? Yes. Did it seem to work right? Yes. Did I over torque it? No. Did I have any suspicion I might have any problem with this thread upon re-installation of the valve cover? No. Is this a total complete surprise to me? Yes. So, what happened to my threads?







Holy Smokes! The entire thread fell out...sort of in-tact in one whole piece. It didn't so much strip out, as it simply broke completely free from the side wall of the bore. To be certain, there were indeed a few broken chunks of metal here & there. But the reality is these threads broke free from the wall and just clung to my bolt spinning freely in circles. So obviously, it lost its torque somewhere in the process and let the valve cover leak oil (badly) out the back side. Thank goodness it was a bad leak. I'd much rather have a bad leak (like this) than a slow weaping leak, which might have taken much longer to notice. Or worse, catastrophically failed all at once while I'm running cruising down the road....a more likely scenario.

WARNING: Notice these anchor threads in the top of the camshaft cover are "Open Hole". That means they are open at the bottom. So, any broken threads &/or metal shavings will drop right into the moving parts of the engine. On the bright side, its real soft aluminum. On the dark side, a little piece of this metal could clog an oil port or something worse, as it gets chewed up and spit around the motor on a wild ride to the oil filter (if it ever made it that far). NEVER, NEVER try to make any kind of repair on these threaded holes while it sits mounted on top of the motor. Just sayin.

So, now what? How do I ever fix this pickle?

Piece of cake! Meet my New BEST Friend (sorry Krabill):



You've heard about this but never seen it, eh? Thought it was some kind of fancy welding term. Well, its really a "Do It Yourself....dream come true" toolkit. This is the same thing you would use to fix a stripped out oil drain plug (with a few extra precautions down there). Best of all, its like building the Six Million Dollar Man (if you remember that TV show). We are going to make it better and stronger than it ever was before!

Buckle up your seat belts...

HF
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Old 09-25-2010, 08:09 AM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFive
STOP! Do NOT continue your project before reading this next post.


Being the lazy person that I am, Dingweed an I figured out how to get the valve cover off without even messing with the intake and fuel injection.

Option 2:

1. Get the wire bundle out of the way from the front left corner of the cover. (The big fat bundle clamped to the frame by the coolant reservoir.)

2. Remove the two hold down screws and lift/rotate valve cover about the right rear corner. Rotate it to the right, out the right side of the frame.

We'll see if it goes back in that easy.


That's Dingweed's lift. He kept asking me if I wanted to raise it up a little to make it easier to work on the bike. Me: "Not yet, we're still trying to get the stuff up top off...." After about 20 minutes of lying on the floor dingling with something he asked again. Me: "Uhh, yeah I guess we could start using this nifty piece of equipment for what it was meant."



ps - I'm getting my bung hole welded this morning.


.
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Old 09-25-2010, 09:58 AM   #112
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Here we go...



The "Helicoil" kit is a truly amazing thing! Something I wish I had invented. But if I did, then there wouldn't have ever been this article...because I would probably never have to work on a bike again. No...not because I would have my own full time mechanic living in my spiffy state of the art shop with fancy lifts (like Dingleweeds). I'd probably just throw a bike away whenever it needed any kind of maintenance whatsoever, and just pull another one from the stable. Yeah...more like that. I imagine (or hope) the inventor of the "Helicoil" is wealthy enough to live like that, if they wanted to. That's how wonderful this special little kit is. Beyond a true lifesaver, its just a freaking blast to install. I don't know why, for sure. But, I just love drilling out threaded holes and installing these Helicoils. Its a lot of fun!

These (complete) kits cost about $40 and come with nearly everything you need to complete the task. Caution, there are watered down versions appearing in auto parts stores (for the same price) which contain fewer components and tools. That feels like a "rip-off" when you're used to buying the full enchilada for the same price. I order mine from "McMaster-Carr". You might find them at other places like Grainger, etc. They come in different sizes like (5mm, 6mm, etc.). That's based on the thread diameter of the bolt hole you are trying to fix. I've not seen one with a mix of sizes. So, purchase a couple on either side of what you think you'll need....if you're not sure.

This particular valve cover bolt hole required the 6mm size Helicoil, that looks like this:



A 5 mm size would screw onto my bolt, but its too tight...too small. You want to select the size that, when screwed onto the bolt, has a little side to side (lateral) play in it. Where if feels a bit loose in the threads...just a little. Not real tight (that's what the 5mm was). You want a loose fitting Helicoil because it is going to compress tighter when its gets wound into the new threaded hole (as you'll soon see). And you want it to "come out right" size for your bolt, when all is said and done. Start too tight, and you won't get the bolt to screw into your finished hole. fyi

The kit has a special set of tools custom made just for this particular Helicoil, including drill bit, thread tap, punch, & special installation tool.



Let's get on with the procedure.

Step 1: Drill the previous thread hole out using the supplied drill bit. I hear there is something special about it, so don't use a regular bit from your own stock.

I have a drill press on my crapola bench. So, I'm going to use that. But, I reckon you could use a hand-held drill if you have a more steady hand than me. Just drill it straight!

First thing I need to do is level this camshaft cover because there are two dowel spacers stuck in it (that I don't won't to remove), causing wobble. Here are my personal "bench" shims of choice.



You just can't beat a pocket full of change. Pennys, nickels, & dimes offer an endless combination of shim thickness. And, I masking tape together what I need to do the job.



Get things leveled and I'm ready to drill.



Step 2: Tap the new thread into the hole. I move the camshaft cover to my vise, using the soft jaw inserts (again).



Now, I'm going to make all you real mechanics JEALOUS. Bet you don't have one of these:



That there is quite possibly one of the greatest tools in my whole armada. A long shaft, ratchet style, tap handle. No more wobbling around for me, trying to keep those dinky horizontal handles aligned while I'm making threads. This baby rocks! You can hold it reeeeal straight, and turn it reeeeal precise (even in tight places) with the socket-style ratchet clicker. Another fine purchase from the likes of "McMaster-Carr".

Use the thread tap provided in the kit. Do NOT use a regular thread tap from your own stock. I hear these are specially designed for the Helicoil.

Also, VERY helpful & HIGHLY recommended that you have some cutting oil made specifically for aluminum. Yes, there is a difference in cutting oils. I don't recommend motor oil or grease. I don't recommend cutting it dry. Soft aluminum is very unique. If you want to do this job right, get some "Aluminum Cutting Oil". Its not very expensive.



Making threads...



Much deeper & stronger threads, at that:



Step 3: Insert the Helicoil into the fresh-cut threads. Basically, the Helicoil is a spring that, when installed, will provide a very strong coil of STEEL threads for your bolt. Much MUCH stronger than the original threads tapped into the soft aluminum bore. The Helicoil will be wound right into those new threads just like a bolt, except it can be a little bit tricky to get it started. That's because the Helicoil needs to be compressed slightly, and the kit provides a special tool just for this purpose. You are able to place the coil inside this tool and start winding (screwing it inward). The threads inside the tool start large and slowly get tighter, so when the coil starts coming out of the bottom its compressed to a tiny bit smaller size than the new threads you are screwing into. Long sentence....make sense? Works like this:



When the coil exits the bottom of the larger black housing, you can remove that outer piece and finish the job like this:



You want to wind the Helicoil into the new threads until the coil is past about one thread from the top of the surface. Don't leave the coil flush or sticking out at all. Go past flush just a bit....but not too deep. Different lengths of Helicoils are provided in the kit to fit the different thread depths that you might encounter. Select the longest coil that fits the job.

Step 4: Remove the "tag" using the punch provided:



The tag is a little piece of coil winding that crossed the middle of the hole (beneath the coil). Its the last part of the winding which has been bent across the hole. They come this way on purpose. You need it to "grip" with the insertion tool for twisting (winding) the coil into the threads. Now, you have to break it off so the bolt can pass all the way through the coil (not bottom out against the tag). Its real easy to knock out. Just a light tap with the hammer does the job.



Here is the finished product:



I put Helicoils in both holes, even though my other thread still seemed good. Its so easy and makes for a permanent solution, that it would be senseless not to do that.

Step 5: Screw the bolt into the new Helicoil threads to verify fit.



All done. Time to re-install the camshaft cover back over the valves, and button up the motor (again).

One thing is for sure, I'll never be losing any sleep over these cheapo weak aluminum threads holding the valve cover....wondering if they might have broken yet (after removing & reinstalling the valve cover). I don't like being held hostage to any weak link on my bike. These Helicoils are infinitely stronger...allowing me to apply even greater torque to the valve cover, if necessary, to get a tight seal. Still can't believe there are only two bolts (in the center) holding the entire valve cover tightly.

Knowing its designed like that, the Yamaha engineers knew darn good & well they should have put better threads into those holes. Why can I say that? One peak down the holes of the camshaft cover anchors will answer that question. There are eight bolts securing that part, and every hole appears to already have Helicoils installed in them from the factory. So, why did those cheap-skakes skimp on the last two holes up top? To save a buck? Give me a break!

Maybe mine just got missed. Maybe your engine is different. Maybe your engine has Helicoils on top too. All I know for certain, is the stock valve cover anchor threads on my bike were apparently only good for one round trip of the bolts.

My recommendation: if you ever remove your valve cover, remove your camshaft cover also and replace those two threads with Helicoils. You'll never regret it. Besides, its easy & fun. The sense of accomplishment will be immense.

HF

Next up....Power Commander installation...& get this puppy running!
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Old 09-25-2010, 10:41 AM   #113
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Old 09-25-2010, 12:59 PM   #114
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Nice thread



So how does she run?
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Old 09-25-2010, 01:40 PM   #115
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Very good on the HeliCoils HF. Having worked on airplanes over the years and quite a few cars and bikes, HeliCoils are a lifesaver. I have several common motorcycle sizes at home and we use a fair number at work. Whenever you have to reliably install and remove steel screws many times from soft aluminum, HeliCoils are the answer. Many aluminum assemblies in aircraft come pre-HeliCoil'ed because it's more reliable and stronger. I did all the clutch cover threads on my Aprilia RXV550 because the side cases are made out of uber-soft aluminum (to prevent cracking) and the threads pull out way too easy. With HeliCoils you can torque reliably and never worry again. So easy to install too.

Now, I see the real reason for the BigBore kit, so you could slip a buncha new tools into the garage "Honest Honey, I have to have these to do the job and I'll be saving so much by doing it myself..."

P.S. I do have a ratcheting tap driver, a bit smaller than the monster you have but handles my full tap set.

Nicely done on the BigBore install!
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Old 09-25-2010, 03:41 PM   #116
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Let's look again at the Power Commander V in comparison to my FMF Power Programmer. The PC installation instructions are actually quite thorough & clear. The operating instructions, well, that's another matter we'll discuss later.



Note, the connectors on the end:



One set of plug-ins for the FMF to connect to the Fuel Injector (only). While the PC-V has two sets of connectors:



One is for the Fuel Injector (same deal) and the other is for the Throttle Position Sensor (new deal). I found the TPS connection hiding in this big black wire cover down in here (in front of the airbox):



It was a little bit tricky to get disconnected. I finally wised up and studied the same connection in my hand (on the new PC-V harness) and figured out exactly where & how the lock worked. That helped a lot....as I sure didn't want to break this connection or tear a wire loose from it, through tugging on it.

Next up, I have to find a place to splice into the Speed Sensor. I decided to do that right here in front of my wonderful 12-O'clock Labs speed healer gizmo:



I simply tapped into the white line coming from the crank sensor (remember the one beneath the Starter), by using the standard cut, strip, twist, solder, & heatshrink method. The other end of my speed tap, was screwed into a terminal strip on the back of the PC-V, like this:



Sooooo, my new Closed=Loop FI system will now know that I just hammered the throttle, while already going 30 mph (for example). This is a completely different ballgame, than what I was playing in before.

But, what are those other two white lines with the stripes? Aaah...very good question. More on-board sophistication, its my wires for this:





My "Map Switch".

This let's me switch (on the fly) between a permanent stored map in the PC-V memory, and the live Autotuner....which is making fuel adjustments in real time based upon Wideband O2 sensor readings in the pipe versus the AFR settings built into the table. This is an important (add-on switch) which lets me turn off the AutoTuner, if I think its misbehaving. Example: temporary bad or inaccurate O2 readings (say.....Krabill borrowed my bike and dumped it in the creek....that rascal). I might need to return to my last "best" map, until I sort out the problems with the AutoTuner. Hypothetically, of course.

What a great feature! But you have to find your own toggle switch. I picked mine up on the super-cheap from O'reilly's Auto Parts, and mounted it just beneath my left leg within easy reach, and hopefully out of the weather.

I positioned my O2 sensor right here:



Between the frame and right side case...just in front of the airbox. Its a very well protected area. Ideally, you want to put it close to the Head. But I would have had to drill a whole through my Powerbomb Header to do so. The Krabill just wouldn't let me do it. This FMF pipe is made of stainless steel, and is very thin wall. So, I had to find me a really good TIG welder who felt confident in his ability, given the situation. And, I think he did an excellent job for me! He welded with stainless wire, so its all turning back to that beautiful bronze color the more heat cycles it goes through.



On the other end of the O2 sensor wires, there is a connector which has several loose color-coded wires that get manually screwed down into the terminal strip on the back of the AutoTune module (which is even smaller than the PC-V). You need a quality "TINY" flathead screwdriver for this surgical task....and super duper magnifying lenses (if your my age).



There is a plug & play "jumper cable" that connects the AutoTuner to the PC-V.....and voila, I'm done! Here is where I put my two PC units:



On top of my airbox scoop and beside my airbox scoop (lower to the left side). It all fit nicely in the little space that I had remaining. And, I have easy access to plug in my USB cord to the Laptop computer program. I'll cover more details about how the PC-V and AutoTuner work together....and the PC software features, later on. The adjustment controls are simply amazing! Here are just a few screen shots with and without the bike running. YES...It RUNS! And NO LEAKS ! ! !









The "Tuning" session will come. I'll cover where I started, what I've learned, and how the progression has gone through different steps.

But right now, I've got to go ride this thing. I can't stand the waiting anymore. I've got to know!

HF

p.s. WARNING: your fuel setup with the stock motor will be too lean for using with this Athena Big Bore kit. Don't do it! Don't even start the bike. Think "dangerously lean". And you want to be running "Rich" when you bring a brand new piston & rings online for the first time. I've got a lot of good info to share on this....and how to do it. Later!
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Old 09-25-2010, 07:22 PM   #117
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Cam chain tensioner is kicking our butts. But, after reading your explanation of how it releases tells me that the book is wrong when it says to rotate counter-clockwise.

If you hold the top and rotate clockwise, that tensions the right side of the chain up against the tensioner and releases it.

Going to go try it...



EDIT:



Set up all the marks with tension on the left side of the chain. That will be the side that is straight/taught when the tensioner extends. Hold the top of the cam chain as HF describes. Work the crank back and forth until the tensioner extends. It does not pop, it is smooth. If you get a pop you have turned crank too far and the cam chain has hopped teeth on the cam sprockets. That will happen because the slack in the chain and your ability to tension the chain with your hand as the cams try to open the valves isn't enough.


Also, another way to set the tensioner prior to installation that is easy single handed...

First, you MUST know what to do to lock the piston back. The outer most spring clip gets moved with your finger-nail while you slowly release pressure on the piston.

Clean your hands so they're not too slippery from the ever present oil on the tensioner. Clean the end of the piston on the tensioner. Set the tensioner on a rag on a firm surface with the piston pointing up. Push the piston down with a thumb while turning the base that is on the table. Push and turn until it is totally compressed. Use your free hand to set the clip.



.

emerson.biguns screwed with this post 09-25-2010 at 08:17 PM
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Old 09-26-2010, 08:01 AM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFive

Next up, I have to find a place to splice into the Speed Sensor. I decided to do that right here in front of my wonderful 12-O'clock Labs speed healer gizmo:



I simply tapped into the white line coming from the crank sensor (remember the one beneath the Starter), by using the standard cut, strip, twist, solder, & heatshrink method. The other end of my speed tap, was screwed into a terminal strip on the back of the PC-V, like this:



Sooooo, my new Closed=Loop FI system will now know that I just hammered the throttle, while already going 30 mph (for example). This is a completely different ballgame, than what I was playing in before.

The speed sensor (reads output shaft speed) and the crank sensor are 2 different things, no?

Anyway, thanks for taking the time to post all the pictures and document the work you're doing. I don't know how you have the patience for it.
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Old 09-26-2010, 09:43 AM   #119
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HF,

Where did you get the info to use the crank sensor? The instructions say not to use it unless instructed by Dynojet.

Thanks,

John
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Old 09-26-2010, 11:40 AM   #120
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Speed sensor....Crank sensor....beats me. That's too technical for me. Whatever those wires are coming out of the crankcase beneath the Starter motor. I traced those up to the white connector beneath my seat (in front of battery) on the left side.

I just tapped into the white wire on the upstream side of the connector (up top) where I spliced in the 12-O'clock labs speedo healer thingy-ma-jigger. Because it "felt" right.

Lucky guess...maybe.

HF

p.s. The ride was good. I had to get out of here and go camping....all alone.

Rē & I had a real good time! Just got back home.
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