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Old 09-11-2014, 01:04 PM   #1
beechhunter OP
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KTM 990 Vibration/ Sprocket loose

Look at my post 9/22/14

I just picked up a "new to me" 2008 990 Adventure. When I met the seller for the initial inspection I was able to ride the bike <15 miles on curvy roads, near Suches GA. The bike felt great with loads of power. Needless to say I bought it. Over the last couple of weeks I have ridden the bike several short jaunts around town and few back roads. I noticed it was a bit vibey, put chalked it up to V-twin, K60 tires. Last week I had to visit my dad in the hospital 100 miles round trip. I noticed under constant power and at speed the bike would vibrate like crazy. Example. 70mph 4500 rpm. Any slight adjustment in power, more or less, would stop the vibs momentarily. (think chain under load or no load) Clutch in or neutral and 8500 RPM no vibs. So I am thinking drive line at this point. I dismiss my fears and try not to think about it.

Well, yesterday I took the bike for a proper shakedown.. 375 miles total 100+ dirt. Something is for sure amiss. I tried not to loose any sleep over it last night, but that was hard. I like my bikes to run flawlessly. It was dark when I returned home so I did not look at the bike until today. The first thing I noticed was small metallic flakes on the wheel. I rubbed it with my fingers to verify it was metal. Yep. Rear sprocket and chain look fine. On to the front. I remove the counter shaft sprocket cover to find fine metal flakes everywhere. I understand there is a groove in the swing-arm to accommodate the 17t, which my bike has.

Immediate reaction is swing-arm bearings are shot but that is hard to believe at 26k. The miles look easy too. Clean bike. I grab the sprocket and it is loose. I bend the retaining washer up and remove the nut by hand. According to the interwebs that should be torqued to anywhere from 45 to 73 ft/lbs. 60 to 100nm. What the consensus? Loose sprocket hitting swing-arm at certain chain loads? Bearings? Comments? Thoughts?

Look at the pics closely. The metallic flake can be seen everywhere.

I plan to tighten the sprocket nut to spec and do a test ride.

[IMG] photo IMG_20140910_160110187_zps353360af.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG] photo IMG_20140911_150445093_HDR_zps52dfc95e.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG] photo IMG_20140911_150333334_HDR_zps06c84bd5.jpg[/IMG]

beechhunter screwed with this post Yesterday at 09:09 AM Reason: change
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:12 PM   #2
crashmaster
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First thing, I would change that front sprocket if it were my bike. The teeth are very worn IMO. Since its cheap and easy, I typically change out the front fairly often (5k to 7k miles). Yes it is a bit of overkill, but I seem to get better chain life doing that with a DID ZVMX chain. Yours is shot.

I've had my front sprocket come loose a couple of times but I run a 16T so swing arm clearance is not as much of a problem. It did cause a bit vibration when loose. Hard to tell where the flakes are coming from but from the pics it appears the sprocket may be gouging out the edge of the recess on the swing arm. Clean it up and have a good look at it.

Also for good measure, check you wheel bearings as well, or just change them out for good measure. Sloppy rear bearings have caused vibes on my bike on occasion.

If I have a torque wrench handy I torque to 90-100 nm, and now I put a very small dab of blue juice on the threads to keep it from loosening.

Others way more qualified than me will chime and give you some good advice.

Welcome to the OC and congrats on the new bike, you're going to love it.
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crashmaster screwed with this post 09-11-2014 at 01:33 PM
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:28 PM   #3
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Wow! That sprocket is toast...which means the chain probably is and the rear, too. New chain and sprockets are like new tires: you forget how sweet they are till you put the new parts on.

Last time I changed mine I found the countershaft sprocket finger tight as well...but I'd bet that's not the cause of the vibration you feel What you're feeling is toast chain and sprockets.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:34 PM   #4
crashmaster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckracer View Post
Wow! That sprocket is toast...which means the chain probably is and the rear, too. New chain and sprockets are like new tires: you forget how sweet they are till you put the new parts on.

Last time I changed mine I found the countershaft sprocket finger tight as well...but I'd bet that's not the cause of the vibration you feel What you're feeling is toast chain and sprockets.
Good call. Change out the whole drive train.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:36 PM   #5
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Chain and sprocket time!! Besides the worn sprocket you can see significant wear of the chain rollers..... that's from where all the metal flakes are coming.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:36 PM   #6
beechhunter OP
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Chain and Sprockets

The guy I bought it from said the chain and sprockets had less than 5k. Normal for them to be that worn?
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:37 PM   #7
crashmaster
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Originally Posted by beechhunter View Post
The guy I bought it from said the chain and sprockets had less than 5k. Normal for them to be that worn?
No way that's 5K miles on that front. But if it was loose for a long time, maybe, but I tend to doubt it. Since the bike is new to you and you are not 100% certain what was done when, change the whole drive train and might as well pop new wheel bearings in there as well. Then you know exactly where you are.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:38 PM   #8
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Chains

The last bike I had with a chain was a KLR and it would do 10k + before needing these items. But it only had 30hp.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:44 PM   #9
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I use DID's strongest 525 X-ring chain and a rear Ironman sprocket, regular steel front sprocket. Like I mentioned, I change out the front often and tend to get 15,000+ miles out of the rear Ironman and chain doing that.

Preventative drive train maintenance will save you a lot of headaches, or worse. Like you mentioned, its not a 30 hp bike.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:45 PM   #10
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That front sprocket may be the original. Perhaps he only changed the chain and rear sprocket?

This would be a great time to re-gear. I highly recommend a 16 tooth front at the very least (stock is 17), and a 45 rear if you're riding off road a bunch.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:50 PM   #11
crashmaster
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That front sprocket may be the original. Perhaps he only changed the chain and rear sprocket?
Didn't the original 17T that came on the bike have the rubber damper in the center? I think he probably did change them all out at one point, but no way it was 5K miles ago IMO.
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Old 09-11-2014, 01:53 PM   #12
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Parts?

Where is the best place to source said parts? KTM Twins? Bike Bandit?
How hard is it to change the wheel bearings? I did this years ago on dirt bikes and farm equipment. I managed with a hammer most of the time. But my ass wasn't going down the freeway at 90 mph on a dirt bike or a tractor either.
I am sure this requires more finesse.
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Old 09-11-2014, 02:02 PM   #13
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I get this chain here: http://sprocketcenter.com/index.php/...led-chain.html

Or you can order the kit with JT sprockets: http://sprocketcenter.com/index.php/...r-s-05-13.html

$222 bucks with the ZVMX chain. You will need a rivet press for the master. I also order up a couple of extra masters, both rivet and clip style to carry with me. Cut a few links off your old chain and with the extra masters throw it in your trail kit.

Try 16-42 for your gearing. I think you'll find it much more friendly gearing all around than 17-42. In fact, I think with the '09+ bikes 16-42 was stock.

Wheel bearings can be really easy to change if they are totally shot. I do with rubber mallet and a punch and socket. Just don't bugger up the wheels, that gets expensive. Put the bearings in the freezer for a while before you mount them up. There is a bearing for the wheel and the cush drive on the rear.
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crashmaster screwed with this post 09-11-2014 at 02:17 PM
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Old 09-11-2014, 02:02 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beechhunter View Post
Where is the best place to source said parts? KTM Twins? Bike Bandit?
...
In the interest of preserving the shaft spline, I recommend OEM only for the front sprocket. For the rear sprocket and chain, I just shop for the best price on decent quality goods.
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Old 09-11-2014, 02:22 PM   #15
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Bad stuff I think. I would certainly check all sprockets, chain, bearings. I think they probably all be effected.
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