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Old 12-09-2012, 06:24 AM   #31
Nailhead
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I'm not sure I understand how a certain type of hose could lower coolant temperatures in any significant amount.

Maybe the interior is smoother?
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:54 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Nailhead View Post
I'm not sure I understand how a certain type of hose could lower coolant temperatures in any significant amount.

Maybe the interior is smoother?

Wondering myself. Sent an email so we'll see or may call. Will post up when I hear back.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:27 AM   #33
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Only thing I can figure is that it insulates the coolant around the engine better, so that it coolant doesn't absorb any heat traveling through the hose from the radiator to the engine, only from the engine itself once it's inside.
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Old 12-09-2012, 11:28 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Katoom119 View Post
Only thing I can figure is that it insulates the coolant around the engine better, so that it coolant doesn't absorb any heat traveling through the hose from the radiator to the engine, only from the engine itself once it's inside.
I don't think the coolant could absorb any heat from the engine given the air space & hose material insulating it from engine heat once it exits the radiator.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:06 PM   #35
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opposite?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katoom119 View Post
Only thing I can figure is that it insulates the coolant around the engine better, so that it coolant doesn't absorb any heat traveling through the hose from the radiator to the engine, only from the engine itself once it's inside.
Could it be the opposite? Do silicone hoses dissipate heat better than traditional rubber hoses?

buzybraza screwed with this post 12-09-2012 at 12:18 PM
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:47 PM   #36
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I have them;





They certainly are slinky.

My opinion of them; I am very familiar with my bikes heat operation, I don't feel that I can say that it makes a noticeable difference to cooler running.

If you buy the clamp set be aware that you need to buy the special clamp tool too. A normal set of wire-cutters will not do the job.

That big tube coming towards us in the first photo is cut too long, about 40mm needs to come off.

I had leaks that needed me to go back in a tighten stuff up to fix it. It is working fine now but the issue is how tight is tight? I didn't know and through more error than trial - 3 goes at it - I have got it to where I am not losing coolant anymore.

Looks bling.... but unless you have the tanks off, very few people will spot them.

Not bad price considering what an OEM set cost.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:48 PM   #37
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Where did you get your clamp tool? I've had bad luck with auto parts store tools for similar clamps on CV boots on cars.
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Old 12-09-2012, 11:00 PM   #38
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Where did you get your clamp tool? I've had bad luck with auto parts store tools for similar clamps on CV boots on cars.
For the crimping type clamps i use a simple nail plier bought at a hardware store. I got the smallest one with a narrow mouth. Just make sure you don't cut the clamp by pinching too much.

While installing my Samco hose kit i used regular worm clamps. As Kamanya also mentioned, some hoses are a bit longer than stock and need trimming in order to achieve the correct fit. It takes time identify leaky connections and sort them out. I got 3 of them, 2 are tken care. The last leak is in the hose connecting the thermostat to the water pump cover. I need to take the tank off and am just being a bit lazy by filling up the overflow reservoir. when there is enough leaking to lower the coolant level in the rad, it just sucks some out of the overflow reservoir . But i will sort this out soon.

Also, when you cut and throw away the old hoseclamps, remember to keep the two spring type clamps used on the Radiator end of the stock hoses. These are good ones and should be (ideally) re-used with the Samco hoses too. I had a leak on the Samco hoses at these ends when i used worm clamps and this was taken care of when i re-installed the spring type stock clamps.
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Old 12-10-2012, 12:04 AM   #39
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For the crimping type clamps i use a simple nail plier bought at a hardware store. I got the smallest one with a narrow mouth. Just make sure you don't cut the clamp by pinching too much.

While installing my Samco hose kit i used regular worm clamps. As Kamanya also mentioned, some hoses are a bit longer than stock and need trimming in order to achieve the correct fit. It takes time identify leaky connections and sort them out. I got 3 of them, 2 are tken care. The last leak is in the hose connecting the thermostat to the water pump cover. I need to take the tank off and am just being a bit lazy by filling up the overflow reservoir. when there is enough leaking to lower the coolant level in the rad, it just sucks some out of the overflow reservoir . But i will sort this out soon.
I know KTMtwins sells the OEM pliers. They are expensive if all you are going to be using them for is this one time application.



I too only got a pair of end cut pliers and used them.

Funny the pipes you got your leaks at are precisely where mine were. I too was just filling the reserve tank for a few weeks. I got pissed off enough to remove the tank, oil tank, exhaust header and radiator to get it.
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:37 AM   #40
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Reply from Samco usa

"The engineers explain that the insulating properties keep the heat in the hose and to the radiator thus not reducing the engine compartment temps which in turn reduce operating temps and no loss of power at the end of a race. The factory BMW world superbike team has discovered up to 9 degrees difference. Having said all that it does not necessarily hold true for all makes and models"

Maybe I'm just not clueing in to the workings but the statement of "not reducing the engine compartment temps" which reduces operating temps didn't make sense. I asked about it and 2nd response...

"simple - run a engine in a heat makes a engine run hotter. Run a engine in cooler temps it run's cooler.


Have a look in the baking section at the store and notice silicone baking pans or gloves - try that with standard rubber..".
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:52 AM   #41
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Bringing this back up to the top to see if anyone else has these on their bike. The bike is new and looking at mods that are more functional vs flash. Supposed to be good quality and (advertisement yes) but says they drop temps app. 7deg. Also seen the aux fan kit and rheostat that drops the temp at which the OEM fan comes on too.

Any first hand would be appreciated - Thanks all
I installed the Silicon hoses about 2 years ago. I also installed a new thermostat and upgraded fan switch this year. I did notice a bit of difference with just the hoses, but that was probably due to not leaking coolant anymore. I noticed more of a difference with the upgraded fan switch/new thermostat. I think that you will see more of an improvement in heat management if the hoses were intstalled with the fan switch as opposed to hoping for a noticeable difference with just the hoses. I ended up getting the Motion Pro crimpers.
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:03 PM   #42
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A lot of talk about leaking hoses, and these hoses are supposed to be trick?

I'm not seeing it, I guess.
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:24 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCflyer View Post
Reply from Samco usa

"The engineers explain that the insulating properties keep the heat in the hose and to the radiator thus not reducing the engine compartment temps which in turn reduce operating temps and no loss of power at the end of a race. The factory BMW world superbike team has discovered up to 9 degrees difference. Having said all that it does not necessarily hold true for all makes and models"

Maybe I'm just not clueing in to the workings but the statement of "not reducing the engine compartment temps" which reduces operating temps didn't make sense. I asked about it and 2nd response...

"simple - run a engine in a heat makes a engine run hotter. Run a engine in cooler temps it run's cooler.


Have a look in the baking section at the store and notice silicone baking pans or gloves - try that with standard rubber..".

Take the "not" out and it makes sense.

It's called heat soak. Basically what is happening is that the heat is transferred from the engine to the radiator fluid, then goes to the radiator to be cooled. Well, the stock rubber hoses don't keep the heat in the hoses but lets it seep out into the engine compartment. So now you're running an engine in an oven, essentially. Because of this the radiator has to work even harder to cool the engine.

Put on the thicker Samco hoses and no heat is allowed to seep through the hoses into the engine compartment; the only place the heat is allowed to dissipate is at the radiator. Since the engine is now not-in-an-oven, it runs cooler, simply because there's not so much damn heat in the compartment. This lets the radiator run more efficiently and actually cool the engine, not the entire engine compartment.

Think of it like this: it's 95* outside and you have every window and door in the house open. A/C is going nuts, right? Can't cool the house no matter how hard you run the A/C unit. Close the doors and windows (I.e., change the hoses) and now you have better insulated the house (engine). So now when the A/C unit (radiator) cools the house, it actually works.
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Old 12-10-2012, 08:08 PM   #44
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I had similar problems. Used a radiator pressure tester to find any leaks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kamanya View Post
I have them;





They certainly are slinky.

My opinion of them; I am very familiar with my bikes heat operation, I don't feel that I can say that it makes a noticeable difference to cooler running.

If you buy the clamp set be aware that you need to buy the special clamp tool too. A normal set of wire-cutters will not do the job.

That big tube coming towards us in the first photo is cut too long, about 40mm needs to come off.

I had leaks that needed me to go back in a tighten stuff up to fix it. It is working fine now but the issue is how tight is tight? I didn't know and through more error than trial - 3 goes at it - I have got it to where I am not losing coolant anymore.

Looks bling.... but unless you have the tanks off, very few people will spot them.

Not bad price considering what an OEM set cost.
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Old 12-10-2012, 11:10 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailhead View Post
A lot of talk about leaking hoses, and these hoses are supposed to be trick?

I'm not seeing it, I guess.
The hoses don't leak, it's the connections that do. Mostly I feel because the clamps are the issue; not knowing how tight is tight, not having the correct clamp tool and lastly, some of the hoses need trimming which causes the joins to be under bending loads.

If I remember right, the instructions don't address any of these things.
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