ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-13-2011, 02:00 PM   #106
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
San Borja y Montevido

The next day we decided to be turistas. George wanted to take his wife out to the San Borja mission and the rock-art hieroglyphics…or maybe they are petroglyphs...regardless, they were taking the ATV so BABs and I took our time to let them get a head start.

It gave me a bit of time to take yet some more pics of Bahi….hope no one minds.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

The road is nothing to write home about, but any miles on the bike are good miles in my book. I have to say it is pretty fun wheeling and jumping the rises while banging handlebars with a good friend.

href="http://s1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/Z_HARSH/Baja%20II/?action=view&current=P1040117.jpg" target="_blank">Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

We ran into George a few miles before the mission and were impressed with how quickly they were scooting down the road.

We pulled up to the mission, had a few bites to eat and little old lady walked up to show us around.

There is a family that lives on site and does the restoration. Behind the stone mission there is the old adobe one, but it is pretty shrunk back. The first one was built in 1700 and then stone one was then built circa 1760. They would build the missions near water and the family has a big garden of everything from carrots to limes. Apparently there is even a luke-warm hot spring to soak in.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

So, as the legend goes…….

When the Spaniards took over, most of the people converted but the old medicine man held out adamantly. They had worshiped their ancestors and to embody them, the medicine man had a cape woven from the hair of all the members of the tribe, present and past. To protest the old medicine man would light a huge bon fire on the mountain next to the mission.

Dressed only in the sacred robe.

Night after nigh, dancing around the fire, but as the legend goes, the Jesuits never stopped the old medicine man.

Photobucket

Photobucket

After leaving the mission BABs and I decided to take a little loop we found on the map back. It was rocky, just as the doctor ordered.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket


Then we turned off on the sandy little 2-track to Montevideo. We passed a white pick-up with a couple good old boys, they looked a bit out of place but we didn’t think too much about it. George and his wife had arrived already and were walking around, but George wasn’t feeling the greatest. 80 dull miles on the ATV was rough on him, but we did get a good laugh about the good old boys in the pick-up asking them which way the boarder was……”ahhhh……first right, first left, first right and 500 miles North????”

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Staring at this ancient art, wondering who the artists were and what they were trying to say is mystifying.

Some think that they were done by shamans on hallucinogenic drugs, perhaps wearing capes woven from their ancestor’s hair.

We climbed around for a quite a while, it was almost hard to leave.

BABs and I had so much fun on the road in we had to see where it led. Then the sky turned silver and we jumped into the pages of a Dr. Seuss book.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Not a bad 100 mile day.
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 06:28 PM   #107
BDKW1
KL"X" not "R"
 
BDKW1's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: SoCal
Oddometer: 896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z_HARSH View Post
but I always figured that the only ones that don’t like GPSs don’t because they can’t figure out how to use them.
Guilty....... You would think for someone that has spent as much time in the right seat of a race car being a crash test dummy that I would be better with them, but no..........

Nice pics! I need to go for a ride, Maybe some Tecate single track self abuse mid week......
BDKW1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2011, 10:45 PM   #108
crashkorolyk
just happy to ride
 
crashkorolyk's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: vancouver island
Oddometer: 24
brilliant trip,great job on the photos,can`t wait to see it for myself!
crashkorolyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2011, 09:46 AM   #109
Fast1
Twisted Throttle
 
Fast1's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: Bridge over Troubled Water
Oddometer: 1,875
beautiful photography and rugged single track.. very nice ride report!
__________________
14 Husqvarna FE 501 10 Yamaha FJR 1300 11 Husqvarna SM630
Fast1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 10:51 AM   #110
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
Much Appreciation

BDKW1 – Love it, oh how I wish I could head down there on a whim.

crashkorolyk – Thanks, glad you like it. Good luck on the trip planning.

Fast1 – Thanks for tuning in!
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 11:03 AM   #111
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
La Rocka Ventana

We headed out of camp and started out the same way as the other day,

Photobucket


Photobucket

Photobucket

down the little cut.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

After a couple rocks and a little sand….

Photobucket

Photobucket

We stopped for a little break. I saw a few tracks leading up the hill last time and it looked like a nice place to stop for a minute.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Then we bushwhacked a section to cut out a few miles of woops. Blasting around your own cacti slalom course is always good fun. It’s just another great thing about Baja riding, but plan ahead. Soon enough we were en-route for the crazy looking rock.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Not sure why I’m always sitting in BABs’ pics, although it is nice to have the option to sit on a relatively comfy seat. On longer trips with multiple tough days of riding I always find myself trying to conserve and not sit too much especially in the beginning of the trip, major monkey butt es no bueno. I’ve never been one to carry baby powder, not that there is anything wrong with that of course.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Definitely a few nice little technical sections on this one

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Just the way we like it….

Photobucket

Photobucket

Not exactly like last year with all the flowers and living desert, but still beautiful if you ask me.

Photobucket

Right after I stopped to take this picture I realized I had a flat. I knew we were close so I putted down the trail a bit further.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

And soon enough I saw her rise out of the desert.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

In Colorado we look for an old stump, in Utah a big rock, this time all we could find was a dead agave plant. It actually worked surprisingly well, the bike perhaps sat a bit crooked, but never tipped.

Like a dumbass I never slimed my spare tube that George gave me after the last Baja trip, so we took a bit of vent hose and connected my punctured tube with the slime‘s valve stem to the new tube’s valve stem and started squeezing. After a good hard laugh about the sound, I got it back together. Not exactly in ISDE 3-5 minute time I might say. I always feel like I am going to put the tire iron through the tube when putting a 21-inch front tube into the rear rim. But after what seemed like hours of pumping my trusty little POS bicycle pump and one CO2 cartridge we had it filled and made for camp.

Photobucket

A bit of woops and a bit of slab later

Photobucket

We were done with another beautiful day in the desert. I debated with myself for a bit, I wanted to be lazy and just leave the spare tube in but I had a brand new thick tube and slime with me. I did the smart thing and switched tubes, and then we hung out by the fire. We went to bed pretty early, -insert foreboding statement here- BABs and I didn’t know it then but we were going to have a big day mañana.
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 06:35 PM   #112
TemeculaRider
Studly Adventurer
 
TemeculaRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: La Paz, Baja California Sur
Oddometer: 565
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z_HARSH View Post


It was good but not exactly Mexico prices at $40 (US) with a couple drinks and lobster stuffed mushrooms for an appetizer, no complaints though.
$40 and no complaints? Oh man! We learned the hard way to only eat seafood at Las Hamacas in Bahia. Last time we were there at the end of the year, the owner pulled up in a brand new Ford pickup and asked us if we wanted lobster. I'm not kidding when I say ours were at least 3x that size and we paid $20 each.

Gringo pricing is one of the very few things that really bothers me about many hotels and restaurants in Baja. Last time we were in San Ignacio the old lady at Rice 'N Beans wanted 1000 pesos for a room late one night. As I shook my head and went to the car she came out and cut the price in half, which I refused even though dead tired. If I were in the US she may have gotten two middle fingers. I will never stop there again because she thought she'd get greedy and take advantage of the late hour.

Man, I loved that area around Mission San Borja. Was the English-speaking boy not there this time to show you around?
__________________
Justin
2009 KLR650 (now a KLR685-Stage II)
My Ford E350 4x4 Baja Van

Quote:
Originally Posted by PirateJohn
you are safer in 99% of Northern Mexico than you are in 99% of Jacksonville, FL.
TemeculaRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2011, 07:29 PM   #113
satmike
n00b
 
Joined: May 2008
Oddometer: 6
Hey Zach Nice ongoing report. Funny to look at the photos, they are all backwards as we were going the other way the next day.
the other funny thing, I ran into George in El Rosario the other day when he was heading north. I stopped and Jawed with him a while as they ate breakfast.
Later Mike
satmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2011, 09:19 AM   #114
RockyRoads
RockyRoads
 
RockyRoads's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2005
Location: Aptos, California
Oddometer: 250
Your photos of the Rockman Trail are absolutely incredible! A small group of us were fortunate enough to experience that trail a few years ago, but our photos didn't quite capture how truly rocky the trails were. Yours are outstanding! We rode that trail because I had been captivated by an advrider story a couple of years before that, showing a photo of that first dog-leg hill climb (the one with the challenging boulders) after the long sand wash--and I said, "We've got to find that trail!" Our ride had some hiccups (all adding to the "fun," of course), and we ended up riding half the trail in the dark, getting into Cataviña close to midnight. It was one of my most memorable, and favorite, rides ever. Anyway, thanks for posting your story and sharing your amazing photos!
__________________
"You will do foolish things, but do them with enthusiasm!"
Around the World, One Journey at a Time
RockyRoads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2011, 09:06 AM   #115
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
TemeculaRider – Thanks for commenting, I was wondering you were tuning back in. I hear ya, just because I’m not going to complain doesn’t mean I’ll be rushing back. Thanks for the tip on Las Hamacas, I’ll have to remember that one. As for San Borja, the English-speaking boy walked over later and we talked with him for a while. He is great, as nice as they come and he has a ton of pride in the place, awesome to see.

satmike – Makes the tracks you were following make more sense. It’s funny that we were following fresh tracks when we rode it too. That is cool you ran into George. Have fun on the rest of your stay down there.

RockyRoads – Thank you, thank you, thank you! Sounds like quite an adventure. I know what you are saying, rides that end on the headlights always seem to be the most memorable. Although, I’m not sure I would want to do that one on the old headlight.
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2011, 09:19 AM   #116
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
La Puerta Verde

The next day George wanted to spend some time with his wife so BABs and I decided to head down to the beautiful beach at Punta San Francisquito. We probably should have hurried out of camp a bit more than we did, but we kind of moseyed around instead. George had a little side mission for us to check out if we felt up to it.

He was out there in the late 90s and the previous owner of San Francisquito told him about a little beach and some old roads that would cut out a bunch of the main road. George convinced his crew, friends like Don’t Do It Doug, Crazy Dave, Cheese, and a couple others to try the route out. All was progressing well, but the roads were not there. Well into it and well after anyone wanted to turn around, it became apparent that there was nothing more than an animal trail and no motorized vehicle had been there before. I’ve heard it said many times before, “then we took some little goat trail…” and I always think yea, what ever. After growing up riding with George, I have found that when he makes a big deal of how rocky something is, typically it is not that bad, however when he down plays a trail it could get real rough. Any ways, they followed the animal trail(s) and when they got around, there was a huge rocky hill they had to climb to get to the road. They were all just about out of water, pushing sunset, and one of the guys was so dead tired that he couldn’t make several previous sections and there was no way he was going to make it up the hill. George rode his bike up, got them all out right as they ran out of daylight, gave the ones that were out a swig of his water and they made it back on their headlights after an epic battle with the terrain.

He didn’t have enough space on his GPS that day so all he had were a few waypoints for the route. George told us that if we felt up to it, we should do it on the way there so we would be going down the nasty hill. He said it was pretty rough and all that was there were some animal trails. He told us to use our best judgment and that he would look for us on the road in a day if anything went wrong. With that, BABs and I headed out through the Green Door.

First we stopped by the jail/vault.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

The route we were doing seemed much less torn up this year, or maybe it was just easier with out the extra crap. It is nothing to write home about, just a sandy 2-trac and maybe a few cacti corpses…

Photobucket

Photobucket

and some green trees…

Photobucket
but even they have their spikes.

Photobucket

There is one tricky part in the route, the road wants to kick you off in one direction, but to get out you need to go in another. A after a little backtracking and bushwhacking through the arroyo and we found it. BABs had his doubts but that’s OK. The road materialized and we were off.

There are defiantly lots of interesting types of cacti.

Photobucket

But these cuddly little guys remind me of teddy bears for some reason.

Photobucket

The Teddy Bear Forest

Photobucket

The road goes right through it,

Photobucket

Then it gets a little rocky.

Photobucket

But soon we hopped onto the main road. At this point we had a decision to make. Go seek out George’s side mission, or just head to the beach. We wanted to, but earlier in the day BABs wanted run a bit harder than I, so I let him go ahead, apparently he laid the pumpkin down and busted the stop for his rear break. Subsequently he fried his break fluid and had nothing back there. Long story short, he wussed out and we headed for the beach

The road in was so torn up from the SCORE course activity that BABs and I had to work at riding side-by-side.

But then we saw it in the distance, the beautiful little hole-in-the-wall, Punta San Francispuito.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

I was hoping for some fish tacos, they were amazing last time, but unfortunately they didn’t have any fish or shrimp. They didn’t seem to have a whole lot at the time but we didn’t care, they had what we wanted most…gas. After deciding to order some huevos rancheros BABs and I grabbed a beer and hung out on the beach while we waited for them to whip up some lunch.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Over lunch we discussed out options. It was already past 2:00, we already rode 85 miles, we felt good but BABs didn’t have a rear break, we had full bellies and plenty of packed food, our water was full, we had our best chance to do the side mission but decided not to, we had no idea what to expect on it, our gas was full, and we had a lot of boring road to do and only a few more hours of daylight left.

We were both torn but decided the smart thing to do was ride the road back. So we saddled up and hit it.
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2011, 03:12 PM   #117
TemeculaRider
Studly Adventurer
 
TemeculaRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Location: La Paz, Baja California Sur
Oddometer: 565
Beautiful shots! I found out this last trip that the former owners of San Francisquito are now helping operate the little resort on the road to El Arco called Piedra Blanca. Javier showed us where to see the cave paintings at Cueva El Carmen and we were delighted to find them!

Keep it coming, man!
__________________
Justin
2009 KLR650 (now a KLR685-Stage II)
My Ford E350 4x4 Baja Van

Quote:
Originally Posted by PirateJohn
you are safer in 99% of Northern Mexico than you are in 99% of Jacksonville, FL.
TemeculaRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2011, 06:25 PM   #118
TooTallRacing
Gnarly Adventurer
 
TooTallRacing's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: Lanesville, IN
Oddometer: 159
Too Cool

This is a dream trip for me, fantastic photos. Thanks for posting.

Hey TemeculaRider - Sweet Van!
TooTallRacing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2011, 10:39 AM   #119
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
TemeculaRider- Thanks, BABs and I came up with some decent shots. Another tip for future adventure is always greatly appreciated, that’s good to know.

TooTallRacing – Make it happen, tahnks for coming along!
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2011, 10:59 AM   #120
Z_HARSH OP
Like margarine?
 
Z_HARSH's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Denver
Oddometer: 487
El Camino de Cabra

[Continued from post #116]



As soon as we hit the road I knew there was no way I wanted to do 80 miles of it back.

We passed a couple 950/990 type pumpkins on the way out, one definitely had a Colorado license plate. He slowed like he wanted to talk, so we stopped, but then he took off. It’s too bad; he had to be cool considering the plate. But we didn’t mind, for we had more important things to find as far as I was concerned.

Then we were there, the first waypoint. I pulled over, fully aware that we had just discussed that we weren’t going to try George’s side mission, but I figured I would give it another shot. I asked BABs:

“Well, what do you think?”

First thing out of his mouth was:

“Why not?”

That was music to my ears but I have to say, expected.

We knew that darkness was going to be our enemy number one. But, I still haven’t had a chance try out my nifty little emergency blanket, although it seems that folding it back up may prove difficult.

We had a few waypoints to follow giving us a general direction. After a couple wrong turns we followed our nose to the water. I was thinking to myself, this isn’t going to be a too bad……

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

We came out on a beautiful, secluded beach.

It looked like a perfect camp spot for a more bonified adventure ride one day.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

After a snack and a few pics we got our first real taste of the beach, well for this trip.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Then came decision time. There was a bit of a ledge we had to climb, but I thought I found a good track up off the beach a little before that so I decided to give it a shot, thinking a good vantage point wouldn’t be bad.

Photobucket

It turned out to be way too soft for the momentum I had so I turned off the hill……right into the giggle bushes like a dumb ass.

Photobucket

ooooooooops…..

Photobucket

Photobucket

Not sure if giggle bushes happens to be the proper term, but that’s what Jocko would have called them, rest his soul.

Thorny suckers, had to stomp a path through by foot. My goretex/gelnox what ever it is now riding gear got a bit of a beating, but it comes with the territory I suppose.

After a bit of wasted effort we were back on track and went around to the step.

On the in-run before the step you had to turn at the last moment to get the right angle, I lost too much speed and didn’t make the rear up. BABs gave me a hand and did the old roll the front tire trick, then he cleaned it in usual form.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

After a bit more beach, wooped out by the elements, it ended and that was that. We maybe should have checked the tides, they were out a ways but it is hard to tell how far in comparison. After a bit of snooping I had BABs follow an animal trail up onto the bluff. I was thinking it was going to be super soft again but it wasn’t a problem.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Animal trails can be tricky to follow, darting in and out, zigzagging back and forth, splitting and coming back together. You need to be constantly evaluating, looking for the best and biggest one headed in the right direction.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

We stopped for a sip of water and I noticed the ol’ pumpkin had a leech.

Photobucket

After a bit of cutting he was free and we ventured on.

Photobucket

Photobucket

I wasn’t on my A-Game and my front got a little to much elevation on this little ledge, I had to back off and killed it, gave a decent vantage point though.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

We were burning daylight and had to keep a move on it.

Photobucket

We were cruising along quite easily though; it’s pretty fun flopping the bike around the jagged trails. I honestly was thinking to myself, “well, this isn’t so bad….almost easy.”

Photobucket

But then came the rocks.
Photobucket

Photobucket

Not the constant bounce of the front tire from left to the right, betting with a great amount of certainty that the next will straighten you out (like on Bill’s infamous trail) type.

No, no, no, the creep over this one get straight for the next one, 1st gear is too fast, miles of clutch slipping because otherwise you’re thee feet below the trail type instead.

At this point it is nineteen minutes after four o’clock in the afternoon, not sure what timezone, but the going was slow.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

During this time I kept thinking we need to come up with a name for this trail. George’s trail, BABs trail, no, that isn’t it. How about Billy-Goat-Rough, no that is too cutesey, plus I’m not a fan of names with more than one syllable, call me chromagnum. How about just the Goat Trail.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Seeing this gave me a good feeling, knowing that at least someone was around at one point in history.

Photobucket

And here we are approximately 18 minutes and 22 seconds later, having traveled a whopping .9 miles. Looking at this now, maybe that’s because we took too many pictures.

And on we pushed, stopping only long enough to let our bikes slow their percolation.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

And then there it was, George’s hill.

Photobucket

Photobucket

The pictures here are a bit light; I guess our concerns were elsewhere. We had to push on, no time to lollygag, the problem is, which one do you choose. First I tried the path to the right, made it about half way and was stopped. With no more going up I turned off to the left, gas it through the gulley, get the momentum, stay straight over he watermelons and bust up the side of the other hill. After a bit of struggle and having to turn the bike off about 4 times to let it cool down I was up. Walked down to point out the path to BABs and that was that.

Photobucket

Photobucket

No time for celebration though, we still needed to get to the road and the sun was going down fast.

And finally we made it,

with little time to spare….

Photobucket
…..after about 3.9 more miles in 50 minutes and 3 seconds.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

but we still had quite a few miles, so we took few minutes, then pushed on some more. We wanted to use up the last of the dusk light gefore we had only our headlights to rely on.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

There is just something about watching the sun set while in the saddle. It’s a pity my camera wouldn’t zoom by this point, watching the sun go down behind the hills was beautiful. Then it really started reminding me of the day last summer I watched the sun go down over Atigun Pass. When I kind of talked myself into riding to Prudoe Bay, and back, in one day, from the road leading to Circle. Albeit 8 hours and 800 miles less. But I digress.

Photobucket

Photobucket


We found it is a very good idea to get your headlight dialed in beforehand (I had to replace mine after last Baja trip) especially with one as bright as Old Yellow’s. I blinded myself trying to adjust it and was seeing a big white spot for miles.

Photobucket

But at last, there they were, the lights of BoLA in the distance…

And we made it.

Photobucket

Z_HARSH screwed with this post 03-13-2011 at 10:21 PM
Z_HARSH is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014