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Old 11-05-2010, 07:38 PM   #16
ride2little
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
Plugs rarely hold and are not a good permanent fix... A new tube can be done quickly too and is a good permanent fix.
I really don't think putting a new tube in "can be done quickly". Although I agree that it's permanent fix, what a hassle.
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Old 11-05-2010, 07:59 PM   #17
Bucko
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Hold the tube, please

I've changed quite a few tubed tire flats, and it's never been quick. Maybe that's because I dislike it so much and build a huge wall between myself and the task and spend so much time dreading it that by the time I'm ready to tackle the challenge it's become so enormous and daunting that every single thing that I've obsessed about possibly going wrong does.

I'd take tubeless anytime. And carry a spare tube, of course
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Old 11-06-2010, 07:01 AM   #18
Motoriley
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Tubed flat

It isn't ever fast for me either. My new trick when a somewhat major problem occurs is to just resign myself to losing an hour. I take off all my gear. Have a little snack or some water. I carry a little 4x4' piece of tarp I lay out so I'm not working in the dirt. Maybe find a shady spot and drag the bike over to it. Then I pull out the tools. I also try to remember what tool or device would have made my little problem easier to solve and add it to my kit for next time. Things go much smoother when you don't feel a big rush to get going.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucko
I've changed quite a few tubed tire flats, and it's never been quick. Maybe that's because I dislike it so much and build a huge wall between myself and the task and spend so much time dreading it that by the time I'm ready to tackle the challenge it's become so enormous and daunting that every single thing that I've obsessed about possibly going wrong does.

I'd take tubeless anytime. And carry a spare tube, of course
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Old 11-06-2010, 08:37 PM   #19
bxr140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raider
In 2010, the advantage of tubes over tubeless is one, and one only - lower manufacturing costs.
Except that, in 2010, there is no tubeless spoke/rim configuration that is as strong, durable, reliable, or repairable (and, I think, light) as the 'classic' configuration with tubes.

I look forward to the day when that is not the case.
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Old 11-07-2010, 03:07 AM   #20
tmex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raider
Really? What, 5psi? At pressures low enough to worry about tubed tyres unseating, you have to worry instead about tubes getting pinched (for exactly the same reasons).

This is neutral ground for the two types of tyre, IMHO. In 2010, the advantage of tubes over tubeless is one, and one only - lower manufacturing costs.
Not at all. With tubes I routinely run down to 18PSI or less on the F8. I would be reluctant to go below 25PSI with tubeless (HP2 and 12GS).

This thread has taken a bit of turn and I will add to it. With any skill at all and the proper tools you should be able to change a tube in less than 30 minutes. I can do it in less than 15 minutes front or rear on the F8. By far the most time consuming task is breaking the beads. Once that is done it is pretty trivial.

FWIW, HP2 rims are NOT compatible with F800 hubs.
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tmex screwed with this post 11-07-2010 at 07:29 AM
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Old 11-07-2010, 09:39 AM   #21
EnderTheX
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One tool most people don't know about (and makes great christmas gifts for riders) is a tool that helps thread the valve stem through the rim during a tube change. Threading the valve stem through the rim is by far my most dreaded part of the repair...



Image borrowed from here: LINK

Just be careful searching for "tube snake" in your local search engine
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Old 11-07-2010, 09:47 AM   #22
ride2little
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THAT little tool would cut down the time and effort of a tube change dramatically! NICE!
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:02 AM   #23
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With basic care (nothing special) getting the stem through the rim (and not pinching the tube, which is the bigger issue) is quite easy. No need for the chain.
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:06 AM   #24
EnderTheX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bxr140
With basic care (nothing special) getting the stem through the rim (and not pinching the tube, which is the bigger issue) is quite easy. No need for the chain.
Don't know what kind of "basic care" you're giving it but when I'm covered in dust, sweating and my hands are getting crushed under the tire trying to fight the the f-ing stem for 15 minutes I would give the world for something to help out. I hate valve stems!
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:55 AM   #25
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here's a different take on the same tool; saw this one in action; little bigger but works just the same. remove all the extraneous cables from your slime pump kit and it'll fit just fine.

website is slooooow today but will eventually (and i mean eventually) load.

http://pitposse.com/airvalvepuller.html
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Old 11-07-2010, 12:11 PM   #26
tmex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
Don't know what kind of "basic care" you're giving it but when I'm covered in dust, sweating and my hands are getting crushed under the tire trying to fight the the f-ing stem for 15 minutes I would give the world for something to help out. I hate valve stems!
I've used the stem snake, and it works well in the field. Although if you have two people (one to pull a pair of irons and one to feed the stem) it is not needed. In the garage I use a "tire tamer" tool which is special designed to reef back the edge of the tire. Most shops that change a lot tires use the tire tamer tool which is where I first learned of it.
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Old 11-07-2010, 04:34 PM   #27
bxr140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
Don't know what kind of "basic care" you're giving it but when I'm covered in dust, sweating and my hands are getting crushed under the tire trying to fight the the f-ing stem for 15 minutes I would give the world for something to help out. I hate valve stems!


I just put the stem through the rim before I seat the first bead...Run the nut down a couple threads to keep it in place and its all good.

Stems have never, ever been a problem for me, anywhere, on everything from a dirt bike rear wheel with two rim locks, to the 4.25" wide GS rim with street tires. What am I missing?
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Old 11-07-2010, 04:36 PM   #28
EnderTheX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bxr140


I just put the stem through the rim before I seat the first bead...Run the nut down a couple threads to keep it in place and its all good.

Stems have never, ever been a problem for me, anywhere, on everything from a dirt bike rear wheel with two rim locks, to the 4.25" wide GS rim with street tires. What am I missing?
Oh, yeah that is easy if you are putting on a new tire...

I'm talkin field repair, break the bead on one side, pull out the tube, re-insert tube, fight with valve stem, curse, finally tube is in and then re-seat bead.

I don't pull the entire tire off the rim when I'm repairing in the field...


Not sure if we are on the same page.. ?
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Old 11-07-2010, 05:09 PM   #29
The Griz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
One tool most people don't know about (and makes great christmas gifts for riders) is a tool that helps thread the valve stem through the rim during a tube change. Threading the valve stem through the rim is by far my most dreaded part of the repair...



Image borrowed from here: LINK

Just be careful searching for "tube snake" in your local search engine
+1 It is kind of a bitch getting the valve stem through. Especially with a stiff-walled tire like the K60.
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Old 11-07-2010, 05:22 PM   #30
rockinrog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmex
This thread has taken a bit of turn and I will add to it. With any skill at all and the proper tools you should be able to change a tube in less than 30 minutes. I can do it in less than 15 minutes front or rear on the F8. By far the most time consuming task is breaking the beads. Once that is done it is pretty trivial.

FWIW, HP2 rims are NOT compatible with F800 hubs.
I couldn't even take the rear wheel completely off and put it back on in 15 minutes....let alone change the tube...lol
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