ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > Parallel Universe
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-07-2010, 04:36 PM   #31
MCMXCIVRS
Begining the Adventure
 
MCMXCIVRS's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Oddometer: 1,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmex
FWIW, HP2 rims are NOT compatible with F800 hubs.
This doesn't suprise me, what was the final uncrossable hurdle?

The next question would be on the availability of suitable aftermarket hubs that will accomodate the dual disks and ABS and work with the cross spoke rims.. Probably too much to expect
MCMXCIVRS is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2010, 05:35 PM   #32
tmex
Beastly Adventurer
 
tmex's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: NorCal
Oddometer: 2,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by MCMXCIVRS
This doesn't suprise me, what was the final uncrossable hurdle?

The next question would be on the availability of suitable aftermarket hubs that will accomodate the dual disks and ABS and work with the cross spoke rims.. Probably too much to expect
F8 - 36 spokes
HP2 - 40 spokes

Mush different angle and method of hub interface and very different spoke lengths. Just about everything.
__________________
my favorite bike - R1200GS
tmex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2010, 08:38 PM   #33
bxr140
Flame Bait
 
bxr140's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: On high
Oddometer: 1,038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
I'm talkin field repair, break the bead on one side, pull out the tube, re-insert tube, fight with valve stem, curse, finally tube is in and then re-seat bead.

I don't pull the entire tire off the rim when I'm repairing in the field...
Oh. Got it. Its just as easy for me to unmount and remount the second bead. I guess I don't mind spending the extra 2 minutes. I always change tires with field tools, so its all pretty much second nature.
bxr140 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2010, 03:24 AM   #34
tmex
Beastly Adventurer
 
tmex's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: NorCal
Oddometer: 2,039
It is much harder to get the bead over the rim (on or off) if both beads are not broken. Breaking the beads is by far the hardest (and most time consuming) part of tube replacement. When working the edge of the tire always be sure to have both beads on the opposite side near the middle of the rim.
__________________
my favorite bike - R1200GS
tmex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2010, 05:42 AM   #35
woody's wheel works
Built to Last
 
woody's wheel works's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: 39*40'33.86N 104*59'54.69W
Oddometer: 3,299
slight modification to ease ''breaking the bead''...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tmex
It is much harder to get the bead over the rim (on or off) if both beads are not broken. Breaking the beads is by far the hardest (and most time consuming) part of tube replacement. When working the edge of the tire always be sure to have both beads on the opposite side near the middle of the rim.
howdy tmex,,,,

FYI,,,there have been numerous posts prompted by the troubles folks had busting the bead on the 950Adventure rear wheels....the Behr rim has one of the highest/tallest safety beads i've ever seen

Rx= grinding/filing down about a 6''section of bead near the valve stem on both sides [we do that so you'll know where to apply the pressure from your sidestand]

now you have a place to apply the pressure and get instant results,,,using your side stand works wonders...

w
__________________
If you have any questions... Post Em Here
..For more info check our website...
www.woodyswheelworks.com
....Wanna e-mail us... woodyswheelworks@gmail.com
......Wanna talk,,,call us
toll free... 1-866-936-0232
........If you're lost???... GPS = 39*40'33.86N x 104*59'54.69W
woody's wheel works is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 08:21 AM   #36
LaPorte
Gnarly Adventurer
 
LaPorte's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Northern Ca.
Oddometer: 455
Replacing the tube

I have changed many tubes due to flats in the field. It's not to bad a job, especially if you have someone there to help. Just had a flat on the rear of my F8 last week. Changing the flat was not bad, got it done in about an hour. Had trouble getting the bike on the center stand. Bike has been lowered. Getting the wheel back on, now that was a PITA. Couldn't get it on unless I removed the brake pads. Something in the braks calliper would not allow it to return to the full open position. Needed to complete my ride home without rear brakes. Next day I played with the calliper and found no trouble, in the garage it would open to the full open position. I replced the brake pads and it's ready to go!

You tell me???????

LaPorte
__________________
If you don't know where your going don't lead!
LaPorte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 08:33 AM   #37
The Griz
North Forest Rider
 
The Griz's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 3,768
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaPorte
I have changed many tubes due to flats in the field. It's not to bad a job, especially if you have someone there to help. Just had a flat on the rear of my F8 last week. Changing the flat was not bad, got it done in about an hour. Had trouble getting the bike on the center stand. Bike has been lowered. Getting the wheel back on, now that was a PITA. Couldn't get it on unless I removed the brake pads. Something in the braks calliper would not allow it to return to the full open position. Needed to complete my ride home without rear brakes. Next day I played with the calliper and found no trouble, in the garage it would open to the full open position. I replced the brake pads and it's ready to go!

You tell me???????

LaPorte
Sometimes you need to get in between the pads with a flathead screwdriver or similar tool and pry them open wider. There was nothing in there that was preventing movement other than than a lot of hydraulic pressure. Most of the time it is too much to overcome with just the human hand, which is why you need to use the rotor itself or a flathead screwdriver or something to re-widen the opening. Why did you need to widen the opening between the pads anyway? Did someone squeeze the rear brake lever while the wheel was off? If the rear brake lever is left alone while the rear wheel is off, the rear wheel's rotor should slide right back in between the pads no problem.

The moral of the story is: don't squeeze the brake lever even the slightest bit while the wheel is off, or you'll have to re-widen the opening between the pads so the rotor will fit.
The Griz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 08:45 AM   #38
The Griz
North Forest Rider
 
The Griz's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 3,768
PS, the reason it was too hard to re-widen the space between the pads/calipers by hand out in the filed is because the the brake fluid, brake lines, brakes, etc were just in use a wee bit ago. Therefore there is a higher level of hydraulic pressure within the system pressing against the calipers in the brake itself.

Now fast forward to the next day when it was easy enough to re-widen the calipers by hand. This is because the brake system was not in use for a number of hours. Therefore there was less hydraulic pressure pressing against the calipers. Easy-peazy lemon squeezy to press 'em open by hand at that point.

Rule of thumb is that when out in the field, the brake system is in use and there is a operational level of hydraulic pressure against the calipers. Therefore it will be extremely hard to re-widen the space between the calipers by hand. So don't squeeze the brake lever while the wheel is off even a tiny bit.



You can feel what I'm talking about when you get into your car and go for a drive after it has been sitting overnight or longer. Notice how easy it is and how far you have to push on the brake to get it to actuate? The brake feels squishy and you have to push it in farther. Then pump the brake a few times. Now notice how much less you have to press the brake to get it to actuate and how much more firm it feels? There is a lot more pressure against the calipers now and the brake system is in operational state.
The Griz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 08:50 AM   #39
LaPorte
Gnarly Adventurer
 
LaPorte's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Northern Ca.
Oddometer: 455
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
Sometimes you need to get in between the pads with a flathead screwdriver or similar tool and pry them open wider. There was nothing in there that was preventing movement other than than a lot of hydraulic pressure. Most of the time it is too much to overcome with just the human hand, which is why you need to use the rotor itself or a flathead screwdriver or something to re-widen the opening. Why did you need to widen the opening between the pads anyway? Did someone squeeze the rear brake lever while the wheel was off? If the rear brake lever is left alone while the rear wheel is off, the rear wheel's rotor should slide right back in between the pads no problem.

The moral of the story is: don't squeeze the brake lever even the slightest bit while the wheel is off, or you'll have to re-widen the opening between the pads so the rotor will fit.
The first thing I did before trying to replace the wheel was spread the calliper with a screw driver. Seeing that the wheel wouldn't fit because of the brake pads, I tried spreading them again and again. No go thats why I removed the brake pad to get home.
The next day with one pad in (piston side) I pumped the brake pedal until the calliper touch the brake rotor. Then with my thumbs, I slid the calliper to full open and replaced the second brake pad.

Like I said-----you tell me???????

LaPorte
__________________
If you don't know where your going don't lead!
LaPorte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:01 AM   #40
The Griz
North Forest Rider
 
The Griz's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 3,768
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaPorte
The first thing I did before trying to replace the wheel was spread the calliper with a screw driver. Seeing that the wheel wouldn't fit because of the brake pads, I tried spreading them again and again. No go thats why I removed the brake pad to get home.
The next day with one pad in (piston side) I pumped the brake pedal until the calliper touch the brake rotor. Then with my thumbs, I slid the calliper to full open and replaced the second brake pad.

Like I said-----you tell me???????

LaPorte
I just did. Read thoroughly above.

The wheel's rotor will slide right back in between the pads if no one touches the lever while the wheel is off. Someone or you squeezed that lever while the wheel was off. Don't do that again. That is the answer.

The technical answer as to why it was hard to re-widen between the pads is in my post above. Let the bike sit for a bit then try and re-widen the space between the pads again. Time is your friend.
The Griz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:17 AM   #41
itsatdm
Beastly Adventurer
 
itsatdm's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: Nor Ca.
Oddometer: 4,411
It is fairly easy to bump one of the pads out of position when struggling with the tire. It pops out and hangs down a little. If you see it, usually you can put it back with that screw driver. If you don't it won't retract.
itsatdm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:20 AM   #42
digdesign
Hack
 
digdesign's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Location: Boston
Oddometer: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
Now fast forward to the next day when it was easy enough to re-widen the calipers by hand. This is because the brake system was not in use for a number of hours. Therefore there was less hydraulic pressure pressing against the calipers. Easy-peazy lemon squeezy to press 'em open by hand at that point.
What you're saying is that hydraulic lock is present immediately after use but dissipates over time. This goes against everything I know about modern braking systems. Is that your personal theory or a fact? Can you point to root cause of lock in the system?
__________________
2010 F800GS
2009 Buell XB12Scg FOR SALE
1990 E30M3 track rat
digdesign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:24 AM   #43
tmex
Beastly Adventurer
 
tmex's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: NorCal
Oddometer: 2,039
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaPorte
The first thing I did before trying to replace the wheel was spread the calliper with a screw driver. Seeing that the wheel wouldn't fit because of the brake pads, I tried spreading them again and again. No go thats why I removed the brake pad to get home.
The next day with one pad in (piston side) I pumped the brake pedal until the calliper touch the brake rotor. Then with my thumbs, I slid the calliper to full open and replaced the second brake pad.

Like I said-----you tell me???????

LaPorte
You need a metric screwdriver to spread the pads on a BMW.
__________________
my favorite bike - R1200GS
tmex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:46 AM   #44
The Griz
North Forest Rider
 
The Griz's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 3,768
Quote:
Originally Posted by digdesign
What you're saying is that hydraulic lock is present immediately after use but dissipates over time. This goes against everything I know about modern braking systems. Is that your personal theory or a fact? Can you point to root cause of lock in the system?
Firstly, I didn't say "lock" I said "pressure level". Secondly, I don't fully understand why what I was saying happens, but it is my experience with changing tires and tubes that what I said in my posts above actually happens. And again, I wasn't saying that hydro-lock happens. I understand how hydraulics work and specifically hydraulic brake systems, but we need to understand that there may be things about it that are very complex that cause things like what I was talking about. Just because you and I understand the basics of 'modern' hydraulic brake systems doesn't mean we know what could or could not potentially happen within the system while changing a tire on the F800GS.

It obviously happens, and happened to LaPorte. Why that is? I don't fully know. If you want to go figure it out be my guest. I was simply telling him my experience of what works and how to go about it.
The Griz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2010, 09:49 AM   #45
The Griz
North Forest Rider
 
The Griz's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Minnesota
Oddometer: 3,768
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmex
You need a metric screwdriver to spread the pads on a BMW.
The Griz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014