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Old 08-27-2014, 08:40 PM   #1
LordSmoke OP
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Assuage my fears - HF chock

Can I really roll my '14 GSW in/onto this HF chock and walk away? Is it (highly) stable and (very) safe? I have no experience with such things. I don't want to find out otherwise with my precious.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:42 PM   #2
JimVonBaden
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No chock is safe to completely trust. That one is good for holding the bike in place so you can strap it.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:50 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSmoke View Post
Can I really roll my '14 GSW in/onto this HF chock and walk away?
No.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:07 PM   #4
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Hmm, so it is the principle and not this particular chock? Strapping would not be an improvement in convenience over hoisting the bike onto the centerstand.

Besides convenience, looking for a compact way to park bike and scooter upright in garage to make ample room for wife's car - a possible Christmas present (indoor parking, not a new car).

Also looking toward getting an HF lift at some point, which seems to benefit from a chock upgrade.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:16 PM   #5
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I'm not sure letting your wife park in the garage is such a great idea. Next thing you know she starts counting your motorcycles.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:21 PM   #6
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I've got two of those...bolted to the bed of my 10Ft trailer. We just got back from our Montana vacation and I towed an F800GS and an F700GS from Dallas to Dillon, MT using it. Obviously, I strapped the bikes down, but those wheel chocks worked just fine. I just traded my F800 for a new R1200GSA LC, and I wouldn't hesitate to roll it into the same chock and make the trip again.

EDITED: However, I just realized that you meant to just use the chock as a way to park the bike in your garage...not as part of trailering your bike. And in that case, NO, personally, I would NOT use one of these to park my bike in the garage, unless you plan on using tie downs from the eyelets to your bars!

Before I mounted them to my trailer, I rolled a bike into the chock just to see how it held it. For one thing, they tended to skate across the floor before the wheel finally went up and over the front part of the chock (and the 800 has a 21 inch wheel...I'd expect it to be worse with a smaller diameter). And once it was in, it is just not all that stable without any straps! On the trailer, I ride onto the chocks and they'll hold the bike upright while I gather the tie downs and strap it down...but I'd never walk away and leave it unattended just sitting in that chock. If I were to give the bike a shove to one side, I'm certain they'd fall over. The F800 was the worst, with it's skinny front tire, but the F700 was only marginally better! And it's not because of any particular issue with the HF chock...it's just the idea that you're balancing 500+ lbs of motorcycle by lightly gripping the front wheel 10" off the deck! That's a lot of leverage, if the bike gets shoved to one side or the other.

We park our bikes on their centerstands, and I feel they're 100 times more stable than they'd be if they were in a wheel chock with no straps!

aclundwall screwed with this post 08-27-2014 at 09:35 PM
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSmoke View Post
Hmm, so it is the principle and not this particular chock? Strapping would not be an improvement in convenience over hoisting the bike onto the centerstand.

Besides convenience, looking for a compact way to park bike and scooter upright in garage to make ample room for wife's car - a possible Christmas present (indoor parking, not a new car).

Also looking toward getting an HF lift at some point, which seems to benefit from a chock upgrade.
For a light weight dirt bike a chock might be fine, but any lean on the big GS and it will not safely stand for long. There are a couple chocks that might work, but the utility of them might be outweighed by the cost and difficulty of use.
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Old 10-02-2014, 03:45 AM   #8
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Thanks for the feedback.

So, I took my 20% off coupon to HF and picked up the Pittsburgh Motorcycle Stand/Wheel Chock (item#97841) - seriously, I wonder if any aspect of this product has anything to do with Pittsburgh, PA?.

It is a simple, well-constructed piece that works for the GSW...


and the Helix...


even with its 12" front wheel...


As you can see, it was necessary to bolt it to a 2x8x1/4 piece of strand board to keep it in place. Furthermore, extricating the Helix is not too bad, but getting the GSW out is a be-atch, requiring more muscle and effort than getting it on the centerstand. I nearly dumped the bike once as I lost balance and ended up lying over the bike holding it up by bracing against the workbench. A near disaster averted by pulling the bike until the tire dropped back into the chock.

So, am I doing it wrong? Is there a secret of getting the GSW out of the thing? I have found that by moving the front brace to the third position, the bike doesn't drop all the way down into the cradle, and getting it out is much easier, but that seems to compromise the security of the chock.

Anyway, in installing, testing, and working with this. I realized something I needed to do. I will post pics of the mod at a later time.
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Old 10-02-2014, 05:39 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by LordSmoke View Post
requiring more muscle and effort than getting it on the centerstand. I nearly dumped the bike once as I lost balance and ended up lying over the bike holding it up by bracing against the workbench. A near disaster averted by pulling the bike until the tire dropped back into the chock.

So, am I doing it wrong? Is there a secret of getting the GSW out of the thing?
The centerstand would seem to be the best solution to the problem, and with some practice it becomes fairly easy to use.
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Old 10-02-2014, 07:45 AM   #10
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The centerstand would seem to be the best solution to the problem, and with some practice it becomes fairly easy to use.
Standing on the center stand puts all of your weight plus gravity down on a fulcrum.. hell I got an F in physics. Center stand you get to use some body weight, and a little pulling.

Pulling out of a chock is a dead weight pull that you then have to overcome the hump in the chock itself.
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:27 AM   #11
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Here's a HF WHEEL CHOCK that I've got mount to my HF lift.

Good for rolling the bike into the chock and then IMMEDIATELY strapping the bike down to the FRAME at FOUR points, front and rear.

http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcy...ock-69026.html

LordSmoke,
Saw your STATIC solution pic:
http://i1002.photobucket.com/albums/...ps05c94609.jpg

Wouldn't recommended using the straps on the handlebars IF you make this your MOBILE solution and put it in a pick up, or the like.
Better to strap to FRAME POINTS.

Here's a nice PDF with some good ideas when you start MOVING the bike.
http://www.grassrootsbmw.com/uploads/Tiedown2.pdf


Now, get wrenchin'.

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Old 10-02-2014, 08:44 AM   #12
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The centerstand would seem to be the best solution to the problem, and with some practice it becomes fairly easy to use.
+1
With a bit of practice .... it's the way to go.

Paul
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:58 AM   #13
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Yes, I agree with the CS method. I pop my 600lb GSA on its center-stand every day in my studio, multiple times. I also use the CS in parking lots, when the surface is level. Much better than any wheel chock.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:15 AM   #14
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I use those chock all the time trailering bike and also in the bed of my truck. They work great with the bikes strapped down. I don't use the center stand when trailering. I like to have the rear suspension working.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:29 AM   #15
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I don't always strap down but when I do I choose this:
 photo imagejpg1-3.jpg

I find that if I let the tire into the mid-20's psi and sinch to some tire squish it's amazingly stable while on the trailer, it's super easy on the suspension, there's no risk of a strap coming unhooked over a bump and no strap interference/abrasion issues. Finally I am not hooking and pulling on the less than robust factory engine guards. In the case of you garage tie down I wouldn't bother letting the tire down or tightening more than a click or two beyond 'no slop'.

Back to your specific situation: If you can't make 'peace' with the CS what about using the chock, side stand down and one loose but secure strap to prevent a fall away from the side stand? From your pic that looks good to me too IF you don't collapse the forks more than a tiny bit. Storing with a compressed suspension is not a good idea in my mind.
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