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Old 01-07-2011, 03:35 PM   #181
tricepilot OP
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Originally Posted by Kiko View Post
Hey Trice will you share some camera info with us? Your photos are stunning and without a doubt some of the best I've ever seen on this site.

Did you use some state of the art hi tech camera that does it all with an automatic setting? Or have you taken a lot of photo classes to get these results?
Thanks for the compliment. I'll say that I've asked the same questions of other ride report photographers and most answers share the same common denominator:

Light + Composition + Story = results you want

The answer is NOT in how much money is spent on equipment. In fact, fancy equipment provides capabilities that most people never use.

The camera I have used to this point is either the following or a version of it (link):

Canon PowerShot SD870IS 8MP Digital Camera with 3.8x Wide Angle Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

Although I no longer will be carrying that camera as a primary. I now recommend the Canon G12 for the express purpose of adding the capability of capturing images in RAW format. In future ride reports my images will be post-processed on a Macbook Pro with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3.

Even these cameras are not required. One of my favorite stories is the high school photography contest won by a student who used a shoebox pinhole camera.

While I haven't fully explored it yet, anyone who wants a good thread to start browsing should check out this one by Antontrax

Although I have a full-on DSLR with some excellent glass, I personally don't bring that type of equipment to Mexico. Too bulky and too stand-outish for the way I roll. I do recommend a small tripod for any portable digital camera due to their inherent disadvantage in night photography.

My photographs pale in comparison to what Igorshen accomplished in Yet another KLR succumbed to the Latin fever. The photography there is eye-poppingly delicious and a visual feast. The original testimonial for the don't-need-to-carry-a-DSLR-on-a-motorcycle-ride mantra was coined by Raoul Duke in:
Nebraska to Alaska - Top of the World Moto Odyssey - Summer 2008

Truth be told, all ride reports (and the photographs in them) all fade away with time. What they really are, are personal journals shared for a brief moment and then put away like an album of memories in a closet. I can go back to each photo taken in Mexico and the feeling of the moment comes back...the texture, the mood, and the emotion.

Latin America, and especially Mexico, is a fusion of time and patina, stone and paint, and most importantly the shadows and history that fade into each other.
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Old 01-08-2011, 03:56 PM   #182
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post

*snip*

Truth be told, all ride reports (and the photographs in them) all fade away with time. What they really are, are personal journals shared for a brief moment and then put away like an album of memories in a closet. I can go back to each photo taken in Mexico and the feeling of the moment comes back...the texture, the mood, and the emotion.

Latin America, and especially Mexico, is a fusion of time and patina, stone and paint, and most importantly the shadows and history that fade into each other.
Beautifully stated.

I'm guessing PUI??

Seriously, though, you may be underestimating the value of Ride Reports such as your own as an archived and searchable database for the rest of us inmates. I've spent untold hours poring over RR's from you and Arte, Vinnie and Misery_Goat, as well as others and have benefitted greatly in both trip planning and general attitude about travel. Then there's all the mechanical and gear stuff. This place is a treasure chest.
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Old 01-08-2011, 04:27 PM   #183
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Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
Beautifully stated.

I'm guessing PUI??

Seriously, though, you may be underestimating the value of Ride Reports such as your own as an archived and searchable database for the rest of us inmates. I've spent untold hours poring over RR's from you and Arte, Vinnie and Misery_Goat, as well as others and have benefitted greatly in both trip planning and general attitude about travel. Then there's all the mechanical and gear stuff. This place is a treasure chest.
Can't argue with that . John

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Old 01-15-2011, 09:34 PM   #184
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I'm sure I'll have plenty of adventures yet still before my kids spread my ashes to the winds, but reading of the two bicyclists makes me want to start life all over again. Good on them, and nice job TP of sharing what you could with them...they'll probably be riding through India in the near future and one will ask the other..."hey what was the name of that crazy motorcycle dude we ran into in Oaxaca?" And they'll both smile and raise the glasses for a heartfelt toast.
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Old 01-19-2011, 08:41 PM   #185
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...they'll probably be riding through India in the near future and one will ask the other..."hey what was the name of that crazy motorcycle dude we ran into in Oaxaca?" And they'll both smile and raise the glasses for a heartfelt toast.
Actually, see Kelly's "Oaxaca" entry of 17 November on her blog....
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Old 01-19-2011, 08:56 PM   #186
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¡Holy Mole!

The Culinary Side of Oaxaca

7 Moles

Chocolate

Cheeze

Coffee

Mezcal

Chapulines

Markets

Tlayudas

Without question, Oaxaca is a destination all by itself for cultural cuisine as anything else. I consider it the epicenter of Mexico for foodie explorers. Gringos used to Taco Bell, Taco Cabana or the usual rice-beans-lettuce combo band found everywhere in the north will be shocked by the food in Mexico in general, but particularly in Oaxaca. Chefs from around the world come here to study and learn, and major portions of cook books have been dedicated to Oaxacan cooking and the specialty ingredients found here. The main idea to grasp is that Oaxacan cooking traces its roots to pre-colonial times and the foundations of many recipes are tied to the traditions of the zapotecs and the mixtecs. Above are the 8 themes that should form the foundation of your motorcycle trip to Oaxaca. Don’t leave there without trying each one for yourself

7 Moles of Oaxaca




At the top of my list of recommendations is to come to Oaxaca for the express purpose of trying each of the “7 moles of Oaxaca”. What is a mole? (pronounced mo-lay). Well, simplified, it is “just” a sauce, but that’s an unfair description. Oaxaca and Puebla sometimes compete for “mole capitol of Mexico”. Puebla is famous for mole poblano, which you might have heard of. The king of the moles in Oaxaca is mole negro. It was the first mole I was eager to try in Oaxaca. I had a plate of it at the Asador Vasco on the Zócalo and it was delicious. Mine was served over chicken, with a side of rice. The word mole comes from the Nahuatl word molli, which means “mixture”. And there are a lot of ingredients in most moles. Chiles, tomatos, tomatillos, fruit, chocolate, seeds, nuts – the list is often long and the process of preparing the mole can be complicated.



Here is a sample list of ingredients for a mole negro:

1/4 lb. chilhuacle or mulato chiles, seeded and deveined
1/4 lb. pasilla chiles, seeded and deveined
2-3 cups hot water or broth
1 whole head garlic, unpeeled
1/2 cup sesame seeds
2 dried avocado leaves
1 head garlic
1 bolillo or French roll
2 tortillas
3 ounces each almonds and shelled walnuts or peanuts
1/4 cup raisins
4" stick cinnamon
3 whole cloves
6 whole allspice
1 sprig each marjoram, thyme and oregano or 1/4 teaspoon of each dried
2 medium white onions, chopped
lard or corn oil necessary for frying
1/4 lb. tomatillos, husked 1/2 lb. tomatoes
2 tablets Mexican chocolate (4 ounces)
salt and sugar to taste

In addition to mole negro, which is a must-try, here are the other 6 Oaxacan moles to put on your to-do list:

mole colorado
mole amarillo
mole verde
mole chichilo
mole coloradito
mole mancha manteles (a.k.a. “the tablecloth stainer”)

And to complete your Mexico Mole Tour: mole poblano (from Puebla)






Each of these moles are distinctive. They all contain one or more types of chili pepper (ancho, pasilla, mulato or chipotle). In the past, the women of the family would gather to prepare moles, but the availability of electric grinders means that many families take their ingredients to a centrally owned grinding service to get the job done.

Mole is always served over something like chicken, turkey or pork, with turkey (Mexico: guajolote; elsewhere: pavo) being the most traditional. If you want the really authentic meat with your mole, ask for guajolote.

Mole sold by the kilo is available in many Oaxacan markets, such as mole negro and mole colorado. Examples of these two that I’ve seen at Mercado de Abastos were extremely thick and placed for sale in colorful tubs. Without the accompanying sign it would be difficult to tell what they were. Customers buy these mole pastes by the kilo, then take them home to use as a base for their own cooking.




Some famous chefs/cookbook authors who love Oaxaca are Diana Kennedy, Susana Trilling, Rick Bayless and Zarela Martinez, among many. The following titles are in my library at home. Stop by, you're welcome to go through them on your visit to Casa Tricepilot:












Chocolate


Oaxaca tops the IgoUgo.com list of the top ten worldwide chocolate destinations.

Link




Chocolate is known as the “food of the Gods”, and the current Lord of Chocolate in Oaxaca is Mayordomo. This is the store/company in Oaxaca to whom the locals come to buy freshly ground chocolate for cooking and drinking. I literally stumbled upon a Mayordomo store walking back from Mercado de Abastos. I could smell the chocolate in the air well before I came close to the actual store and the line of people inside it, waiting for their turn at the register and the grinders. The idea is to pay first at the register for what you want, then take your receipt to the crew of grinders to get your product. I didn’t buy any ground chocolate this visit (next time I will), I was happy to buy some boxed Mayordomo chocolate to sample on the street and bring home (the supply for home got smaller as my time in Oaxaca lengthened).



The Mayans were early users of chocolate in rituals, and the Aztecs learned many uses of chocolate from Mayan tradition. To taste chocolate in Oaxaca is to taste history – so don’t expect the flavor of a Hershey Bar. Chocolate is used in drinks such as Atole, Champurrado (actually, chocolate based Atole), Mexican hot chocolate, and Tejate. All of these are traditionally whisked with a molinillo.


Atole: masa (corn) based drink, often contains cinnamon or vanilla. Sold on the street almost everywhere in Mexico. Kind of thick and takes just a little getting used to. You’ll love it once you do. Very classic Mexico drink. You have to have your Atole stamp to be considered a Mexico Adventurer.


Atole Recipe

Serves: 5-6
Ingredients:

1/2 cup masa harina (masa flour)
5 cups milk or water, according to taste
1/4 cup piloncillo, (Mexican sugar cones) chopped fine or grated
1 stick cinnamon (canela) or 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 vanilla bean (split lengthwise) or 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Preparation:

In a large saucepan, whisk the water or milk into the masa flour little by little until completely mixed and free of lumps. Heat over meadium heat, stirring constantly, until it just begins to thicken. Add piloncillo and cinnamon stick or ground cinnamon. Scrape seeds from vanilla bean into pan or add vanilla extract. Stir vigorously until sugar is dissolved, then bring to a boil, stirring constantly to keep it from becoming lumpy.
Remove cinnamon stick. Serve hot in mugs.

Champurrado: Atole with the addition of cacao. Often served with churros or tamales during Christmas and Día de los Muertos.


Mexican Hot Chocolate: milk with melted Mayordomo chocolate chunks (typical example)



Tejate: Maize and cacao drink. includes seeds of the mamey fruit. Very popular with Mixtec and Zapotec people in rural areas as well as in Oaxaca proper. Kind of a pasty drink because of the ingredient rosita de cacao that floats to the top. It’s served cold. Very Oaxacan. Look for women selling Tejate at the markets, they’re known as Tejateras. Its an historic drink and not to be missed in Oaxaca.




As mentioned, these drinks are often frothed using a molinillo, a type of fancy wooden whisk. You’ll find them all over Oaxaca so get one as a souvenir (something I purposed to do but forgot until I had left Oaxaca). As I was typing this, I took a break and broke out my supply of Mayordomo Clásico to make Mexican hot chocolate. Funny thing was, when I bought the box in Oaxaca, I thought I was buying chocolate bars. I opened the box there, unwrapped one of the gold foil bricks of chocolate, and commenced to munching. It wasn’t until I read the instructions on the side of the box that I learned they were bars for melting in milk for a drink. (hint: to speed up the melting process, pulverize the individual chunks in a blender. Use as many as you wish, to suit your taste). I stirred in the chocolate powder with a spoon, I wish I had a molinillo. To use a molinillo, simple place between the palms of your hand and move the molinillo back and forth rapidly to froth the drink.

Keep an eye out in a Mayordomo store while there, as in addition to chocolate and its derivatives, they also sell mole negro and mole rojo(coloradito), although I recommend buying moles in a market for a more rustic experience.

tricepilot screwed with this post 01-20-2011 at 07:48 PM
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:31 PM   #187
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Hell Trice, you're more Mexican than I am and I am Mexican. Born in Valle Hermoso. Dual citizenship.

Arte, Andres and several others are doing Doos on their KLRs on the 29th at my place. If you are in the RGV area you're welcome to drop by and help me shoot spit balls at 'em while they work.

Great report, looking forward to having a beer with you someday. Sounds like you're a wealth of Mexico travel knowledge...
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Old 01-20-2011, 10:30 AM   #188
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Hell Trice, you're more Mexican than I am and I am Mexican. Born in Valle Hermoso. Dual citizenship.

Arte, Andres and several others are doing Doos on their KLRs on the 29th at my place. If you are in the RGV area you're welcome to drop by and help me shoot spit balls at 'em while they work.

Great report, looking forward to having a beer with you someday. Sounds like you're a wealth of Mexico travel knowledge...
If there was a way for me to get dual citizenship I'd gladly do it

I've been talking with Arte via PM about the DOO jobs for the KLRs. Don't let them reinstall linear springs! Go for the torsion springs!
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Old 01-20-2011, 10:34 AM   #189
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Hairy Bikers Cookbook - Mole Negro

You probably haven't heard about the Hairy Bikers Cookbook.....hilarious! Entertaining and informative at the same time....

"If mezcal is the signature drink of Oaxaca, mole is the signature dish of Oaxaca"






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Old 01-20-2011, 04:44 PM   #190
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Food report hit the spot, I gotta go find a couch!

I can't remember if it was this thread or some other, but I have a sticky in my notebook of Sue Trilling's cooking school "Seasons of my Heart". Is she still there in Oaxaca?

I was eyeballing the one-day class that included a shopping trip to the local markets and cook-off back at the school. Sounded like a worthwhile splurge while in Rome.

Keep it coming, man.

(an elixir for the 3 feet of snow sitting right outside my door )
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Old 01-20-2011, 07:59 PM   #191
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Susana Trilling: Seasons of my Heart (Oaxaca cooking)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripod View Post
Food report hit the spot, I gotta go find a couch!

I can't remember if it was this thread or some other, but I have a sticky in my notebook of Sue Trilling's cooking school "Seasons of my Heart". Is she still there in Oaxaca?

I was eyeballing the one-day class that included a shopping trip to the local markets and cook-off back at the school. Sounded like a worthwhile splurge while in Rome.

Keep it coming, man.

(an elixir for the 3 feet of snow sitting right outside my door )
Glad you asked about Susana Trilling and her Oaxaca school: YES, she is still going, as strong as ever. Here is the link with course schedules, descriptions, and prices.



Susana Trilling



Her classic book:





Another great one a little bit off the radar.....but teaches the 7 moles of Oaxaca down to the last detail:





Found this for you: Susana gives a tour of the market at Etla:


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Old 01-20-2011, 09:24 PM   #192
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You're making me hungry. Nice find on the Susanna video, grasshopper.
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Old 01-24-2011, 11:44 AM   #193
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Mole Fantástico



When Paul and I were in Mexico this Summer he found this restaurant in San Cristobal de las Casas. He ordered a mole that looked exactly like this. I came a few minutes later and ordered the same thing. Absolute heaven. So sweet and delicate. I almost cried when I saw this picture.

Those ride reports do get put away, but reading someone elses report causes us to remember those undefineable moments that are not explainable to anyone because it is just a pure memory. You experienced it and if you have experienced this type of "México" you are changed forever.




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Old 01-24-2011, 11:52 AM   #194
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Those ride reports do get put away, but reading someone elses report causes us to remember those undefineable moments that are not explainable to anyone because it is just a pure memory. You experienced it and if you have experienced this type of "México" you are changed forever.






Well said Jeff
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Old 01-24-2011, 09:34 PM   #195
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Oaxacan meals

One of the things I miss most is a traditional Oaxacan breakfast. The huge mug of chocolate, perhaps a pan dulce but most of all one of those big, delicious tamales! Yum! Now that's the way to start the day!
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