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Old 01-26-2011, 04:47 PM   #211
Sourjon
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Thanks for the great insights into the local culture! Do you haggle over price in these markets?

John
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Old 01-26-2011, 05:41 PM   #212
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Originally Posted by EmilianoXR650L View Post
.... aveces me parece que conoces mi pais mas que yo .... !!!!!!!!!

saludos y felicidades por documentar cada detalle con tan buen estilo !!!!!!
Gracias por el cumplido

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Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
Best chapulines I've had were served on a grilled flat tortilla (like a chalupa) with melted Oaxacan cheese and chorizo seco. Also a little celantro and cebolla. My friend pulls all the legs off before serving.

Yummy!
Excellent recipe

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sourjon View Post
Thanks for the great insights into the local culture! Do you haggle over price in these markets?

John
Excellent question. As a general rule, never. Usually while traveling on a motorcycle there's no room for anything large, so smaller items aren't worth haggling over PLUS there should be a sensitivity to the fact that one doesn't have to go into automatic Morrocan Bazaar mode when traveling as an American outside the U.S.. The vast majority of these folks are making a scratch living so I pay the going rate. I bought the mezcal bottle outside the market place, so I shopped around before I picked out an añejo and I think I mentioned I found the same bottle for thus&such price and so got it cheaper.

While in the travel mode, and shopping for a hotel room, it isn't uncommon to ask for "a cheaper room", or in an empty hotel, say thanks and then feign walking out the door. You'll usully get offered a better rate if the first one was known to be high. But in markets, you're really not buying anything where haggling makes a difference anyway, and to do so often marks one as an obtuse clod. If you really don't like the price, just walk away without haggling. If they really want to make a sale, a new price will be offered as you begin to leave. In these instances, always let the shop keeper make the call. Certain exceptions may apply to jewelry and leather goods, and other higher-end commodities. On those items a certain level of give-and-take bargaining might not only make sense, but be expected. Just use common sense.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:05 PM   #213
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And Now Time Once Again For......

Our Spanish Word

Today we actually have two culinary related phrases for your travel use:

tengo hambre

vs

tengo hombre


and


¿hay huevos?

vs

¿tiene huevos?

In the first example, it is very common in spanish to use the verb tener (to have) to indicate a state of being. For example, "how old are you?" is translated "¿cuantos años tienes?"; literally, how many years do you have. In other words, in our own culture, "I am 21" is custom, in spanish "I have 21 years" is the norm. Same with being hungry or thirsty. We say quite literally "I am hungry" or "I am thirsty", when in spanish, you have one or the other (or both, if you're unfortunate). So you would say "tengo hambre" or "tengo sed".

But be careful when pronouncing "tengo hambre", because if it comes out as "tengo hombre", well, you've just said that you have a man. And, well, our best wishes to you both in your future lives together if that's the case.



In the second instance, let's say you're at breakfast and you'd like to order some eggs, or huevos. The waiter comes to the table and you say "tiene huevos hoy?". He looks at you with a glare. That's because you've just asked him using a common colloquialism if he basically has balls, or cojones. In other words, to have huevos is to have the balls to say or do something (or not, si no tienes huevos).

Much better to ask "¿hay huevos?" - "are there eggs?", so as not to give chance that you'll be taken as a rude viajero. Don't forget to ask for a little tocino in your order...everything tastes better with bacon. But you knew that.
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Old 01-26-2011, 06:36 PM   #214
SchizzMan
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How 'bout a brief discourse on the trepidations of asking to hug (embrace) a woman or maybe trying to say you're embarrassed? Have had riotous good times with this part of the Spanish lexicon.

A Gringa in my party once responded to an off-color joke by exclaiming to the young Mexican man how embarrassed she was. Or so she thought.
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Old 01-26-2011, 07:00 PM   #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
How 'bout a brief discourse on the trepidations of asking to hug (embrace) a woman or maybe trying to say you're embarrassed? Have had riotous good times with this part of the Spanish lexicon.

A Gringa in my party once responded to an off-color joke by exclaiming to the young Mexican man how embarrassed she was. Or so she thought.
Estoy (estar) embarazada - to be pregnant - I'm pregnant

Tengo (tener) vergüenza - to be embarrassed (lit. to have shame) Also, me da vergüenza or estoy avergonzado/a

Abrazar - to hug. ¡Abrázame! - hug me! ¡Quiero abrazarte! - I want to hug you!
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:53 PM   #216
SchizzMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
Estoy (estar) embarazada - to be pregnant - I'm pregnant

Tengo (tener) vergüenza - to be embarrassed (lit. to have shame) Also, me da vergüenza or estoy avergonzado/a

Abrazar - to hug. ¡Abrázame! - hug me! ¡Quiero abrazarte! - I want to hug you!
So when my friend said to my Chilanga "daughter", "Quiero embarazadate", she was very polite to smile and give him a hug?
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Old 01-27-2011, 12:46 AM   #217
pdedse
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TP you're killing me with with las siete delicias oaxaqueñas...just when you thought you'd seen all there was to see in ride reports on Mexico...
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:13 AM   #218
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
PLUS there should be a sensitivity to the fact that one doesn't have to go into automatic Morrocan Bazaar mode when traveling as an American outside the U.S.. The vast majority of these folks are making a scratch living so I pay the going rate.

Thanks TP. Here's the other end of that: Is tipping a common part of the culture as it is here.

John
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Old 01-27-2011, 07:47 AM   #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SchizzMan View Post
So when my friend said to my Chilanga "daughter", "Quiero embarazadate", she was very polite to smile and give him a hug?
Considering the fact that he said "I want to impregnate you" (), her response was very gracious

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdedse View Post
TP you're killing me with with las siete delicias oaxaqueñas...just when you thought you'd seen all there was to see in ride reports on Mexico...
Just the benefit of picking one fabulous spot in Mexico and spending the time to get to know it better. Beats the "If its Tuesday, it must be Rome" thing by a mile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sourjon View Post
Thanks TP. Here's the other end of that: Is tipping a common part of the culture as it is here.

John
This is an excellent question John. Let's talk propinas (tips).

Yes, tipping in Mexico is appropriate and is as appropriate as it is back here at home.

The crucial idea is to remember that as gringos, we represent not only ourselves but those that come to Mexico behind us. Therefore, how we behave is, in my humble opinion, extremely important. Following normal tipping guidelines therefore goes a long way to not only "doing the right thing", but adds to the image of moto travelers in general.

Tourism in Mexico is huge, somewhere around 15% or so of GDP. Travel and tourism wages are low for the common worker, so when you factor the percent of GDP with that fact, you realize how many people are employed in the business. Outside of the three major tourist draws, ruinas, colonial cities, and beaches, millions of everyday people also make their living at restaurants and hotels. And don't forget your roadside taco stand.

RESTAURANTS:

Leave a 10-15% tip based upon the total of the bill before IVA is added. IVA is Impuesto al Valor Agregado and means Value Added Tax. Since IVA is normally around 16% of the bill (11% in border states), you can use that figure to calculate your tip. Scan your bill in large hotels and make sure that propina is not already listed. If it is, then your bill already includes a tip and you of course don't leave a second tip.

FOOD STANDS:

Different than the above. When you pay the person preparing the food directly and not a waiter, you do not tip, even if there are chairs available to sit at and eat your food. Remember - its when you're seated at a table and someone serves you, thats your cue to consider leaving a propina if you get good service.

TAXI DRIVERS:

Taxi drivers are not normally tipped. The exception is when they go out of their way to provide service such as carrying a lot of bags or waiting for you a long time. There are times when tipping a taxi driver may be a good idea: (1) When you hire a taxi by the hour to take you on a tour. I did this in Puerto Vallarta. I agreed to a set price per hour, and then told the driver to take me around the city to see everything that was on my list. He would wait while I jumped out to take pics or to read things, then I'd jump back in and off we would go. He did such a good job that I paid him the agreed fee, plus a propina. (2) Using the "taxi trick" which is hiring a taxi to lead you to your hotel when entering a city or out of the city when leaving to your next destination. Here again, an agreed upon fee is a good idea, but if the guy does a good job and is fun to deal with, I usually give him a tip, just for fun.

BARTENDERS:

Easy one. Always tip your bartender home or abroad. I always tip up front for two reasons: ensures good service (and good drinks) the whole evening and (2) Ensures you have money to actually leave a tip at the end of the night

HOUSEKEEPERS:

This is an important area. Always tip your housekeeper by leaving a propina on the night stand, add a note ¡gracias! with your tip. I don't like piles of coins so I always empty my riding pants of all coin pesos, plus add bills to leave the amount I want to leave. These people are often at low or now salary and depend almost entirely on the tips they receive. Tip your housekeeper! Important! For a long stay with more than one person in a room, leave more. For single overnights on a motorcycle trip, anywhere from 20 to 50 pesos is good, more if the room is left a mess.

THE BOTTOM LINE: Represent yourself well as a moto traveler in Mexico, and set the stage for others riding behind you in the future - being kind, offering respect, and dispelling the image of the "ugly American" goes a long way to good relations for both cultures. Tip fully and appropriately in Mexico, and leave a cheerful note when you can.
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Old 01-27-2011, 08:21 AM   #220
mundobravo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
Estoy (estar) embarazada - to be pregnant - I'm pregnant

Tengo (tener) vergüenza - to be embarrassed (lit. to have shame) Also, me da vergüenza or estoy avergonzado/a

Abrazar - to hug. ¡Abrázame! - hug me! ¡Quiero abrazarte! - I want to hug you!
on my first trip to mexico many years ago I freaked out a few Mexicans trying to telling them I had ridden down from New mexico on a Motorcycle.
What I was telling them was that I was from #9 mexico and I'd come down on a fine Joint of pot.
New - nuevo
#9 = nueve
motorcycle - moto
pot ----- mota
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Old 01-27-2011, 09:32 AM   #221
Arte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mundobravo View Post
on my first trip to mexico many years ago I freaked out a few Mexicans trying to telling them I had ridden down from New mexico on a Motorcycle.
What I was telling them was that I was from #9 mexico and I'd come down on a fine Joint of pot.
New - nuevo
#9 = nueve
motorcycle - moto
pot ----- mota


also be aware of accentuation as you speak.

El Bebé = The Baby

El Bebe = He Drinks

Como = I eat

Cómo? = How?

and more endless samples.

but lets now let Trice keep going on iluminandonos with his great report

...well just one more:

Iluminar = to light up

Iluminar - to briefly educate
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Old 01-27-2011, 09:42 AM   #222
Aanarchy
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Tequila, Mezcal and Chapulines

Maguey, blue agave and popcorn.

I dig the chapulines - kind of like a spicy popcorn.

Your ride reports just get better and better. This one is fantastic. I wish I could get pics like these. Mine are never worth saving.

I've been to Oaxaca twice, my favorite place in Mexico.
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Old 01-27-2011, 10:17 AM   #223
Wolverine1305
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good lessons

Trice. thanks for sharing your ride report and your experience
good lessons of English and Spanish. It is very easy learning english and spanish this way.
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Old 01-28-2011, 07:20 PM   #224
SchizzMan
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Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post
Considering the fact that he said "I want to impregnate you" (), her response was very gracious
My friend and I used to take church mission teams to Mexico City and he was a hoot! Former AF jet jockey flying for SWA. You know the type.

My MC "family" was visiting and the remark was made after church - right out front. In front of her parents and novio. I thought I was going to cough up a lung! They never even flinched. Just smiled and hugged like nothing funny was said while I was rupturing blood vessels in my face.

Good times.
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:19 PM   #225
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Trice. thanks for sharing your ride report and your experience
good lessons of English and Spanish. It is very easy learning english and spanish this way.
damn I'm trying not to highjack this most excitant thread but you got to see this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngRq82c8Baw
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