ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-20-2010, 10:46 AM   #106
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
Polytone









tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 10:58 AM   #107
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
The Hotel Maela

In the midst of all the hotel Options in Oaxaca, I found the Hotel Maela as recommended by Traditions Mexico

This is a small company specializing in backcactus Mexico tours, especially artesania based tours. I tried linking up with the owner, Eric Mindling, but just flat ran out of time. I highly recomend that you familiarize yourself with Eric's offerings if you are at all interested in artesanias, Day of the Dead, Oaxaca and/or Patzcuaro.

Note the walking distance to the zócalo, as well as Santo Domingo and even the first class bus station:


tricepilot screwed with this post 12-20-2010 at 11:21 AM
tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 11:03 AM   #108
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
Fruit Salad



One of the best things about Oaxaca are the infinite number of walk-in alleys and discombobulated nooks and winding entrances to the many restaurants, businesses, and homes. Walking by this address I almost snapped my head. I'm jealous. I want to duplicate this at home.
tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 11:10 AM   #109
Lunatic
Dan Keyhoety
 
Lunatic's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: DOWN ON THE BORDER , LAS CRUCES, NUEVO MEHICO
Oddometer: 611
Report

Great report !!! Loaded with lots of usefull info .
__________________
LIFE IS A BANQUET AND MOST POOR BASTARDS ARE STARVING!

Don't be afraid your life will end, be afraid that it will never start.

Arrogance is the anesthesia that dulls the pain of stupidity
Lunatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 11:12 AM   #110
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
The Last of the Mohicans



This was the last I saw of our posses's motos - the first morning in Oaxaca, they all took off for San Cristóbal de las Casas for the Beemer Rally. Their wives/girlfriends flew in the day before, and rented a car. The traveling caravan, bikes and the rental car, took off on a bright blue morning after I had joined them for a goodbye JAVA

By the end of the day, there would be one crash, one abandoned bike, and a little getting lost and a whole lotta rain. I may get into that a bit later, but suffice to say, my time by myself in Oaxaca was pura vida.
tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 11:17 AM   #111
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatic View Post
Great report !!! Loaded with lots of usefull info .
Glad you are enjoying. We're just about to crack open the keg of Oaxaca happenings and recommendations this week. No single visit to a Mexican city can do it all, but Oaxaca is tailor-made for a mega-stay the first visit so that you can get your bearings and sample what's available, sort of like tapas.

Then you go back and feast.
tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 06:24 PM   #112
bigdon
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Oddometer: 2,545
I Love those old solid wood doors. They must be at least 4" thick.
Very Cool!
__________________
ADV Relay Rider 08 (The Texas Connection)
Ride Pooie Ride

Don't stop riding until you get to the crash , you might save it!
bigdon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 06:54 PM   #113
PirateJohn
Banned
 
PirateJohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: Uvalde, TX
Oddometer: 22,219
Quote:
Originally Posted by crashmaster View Post
Excellent! Thanks for the detailed maps. I need to go pay those cops a visit for sure on my way back and see how good they are.

Next time I ride through there I hope to have some cameras mounted on the bike. I can see myself now - bad Spanish, pulling out your map, comparing notes (and images) with the Transitos.

Hell, they will probably be paying me to get me the hell out of there.
PirateJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 07:56 PM   #114
Gitana
A work in progress
 
Gitana's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: Rocky Mountain High Colorado
Oddometer: 7,049
Pura vida - si! Much better than puro pedo.

I so enjoy your ride reports. And the photographs. It's such a nice contrast to the gray, drizzly Seattle winter. I need a Mexico fix.
__________________
Anne
“Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by assholes.” - William Gibson
"Don't be afraid to be open-minded. Your brain isn't going to fall out." - Unknown
2008 WR250R | 2008 DL650
Gitana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2010, 08:48 PM   #115
DocAxeYarYar
RideDualSport.com
 
DocAxeYarYar's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Oddometer: 780
Tricepilot's Oaxaca

Looking forward to the next installment, and what's up with the bikes! Beautiful colors, its like walking through an oil painting. Have a great Christmas and thanks for sharing!

__________________
My XR650R Build:
http://ridedualsport.com/forum/index.php?topic=2748.0
DocAxeYarYar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2010, 04:26 AM   #116
farrell caesar
Seezer
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Location: Trenton Il.
Oddometer: 399
mexico

Thanks for the report. We still have a place we can go and not have TSA fondling our junk. How long can I resist the temtation to return
__________________
seezer
farrell caesar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2010, 08:22 AM   #117
BajaRat
Studly Adventurer
 
BajaRat's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Austin, Texas - Köln, Germany
Oddometer: 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post


Meet Juan Pelota. I don't know if that's his real name, or if he has a name at all. Its the name I gave him because for some reason, I thought of Juan Pelota, the name of the coffee bar at Mellow Johnny's Bike Shop, owned by Lance Armstrong, in Austin, Texas. But this hog isn't a Texas hog, he's a Mexican hog. And he doesn't live on the route we were taking to Veracruz (the city) either, but far off the beaten path. His pen is on a hillside behind a house in Tlapacoyan, Veracruz state, with a lot of other hogs. Their Mexican owner has been labled by the United States Government as a criminal. I think he's a hero.

That story, next.
Juan Pelota
One Pelota
One Ball
Lance Armstrong

So,

Did you name the pig Juan Pelota because he had one nut?

Inquiring minds want to know.
__________________
'Charlie' owns the night....
BajaRat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2010, 01:33 PM   #118
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
It All Boils Down to Calcium Carbonate

Hierve el Agua - "The Water Boils"







One of the great ways to leave your base of Oaxaca and begin some exploring is to start by selecting one of the pinwheel highways that fan out from the city and penetrate the surrounding valleys. And one of the classic agendas is to head out to find Hierve el Agua and then work your way back, visiting as many sites as you are interested in and/or have time for.

Hierve el Agua is Spanish for “the water boils”. You’ll find it about 50 miles east of the center of Oaxaca, off of Mx 190. On the way you’ll be passing some amazing places, like Tule, Dainzú, Teotitlán de Valle, Tlacolula, Yagul, and Mitla. Keep them in mind as you keep a keen eye out for signage for Hierve el Agua, as you’ll be leaving the highway and bending through some backcactus towns on dirt roads before you begin the climb into, and over, the mountains to find this prize. The road though well maintained is uneven in many places. If you’ve been up to Real de Catorce or down to Batopilas, this route will be a walk in the park, but use caution if you’re visiting on a cruiser or any heavily loaded bike. This is a somewhat touristed spot, so from time to time the hotels will arrange tours via taxi colectivo.

You’ll have to pay a minor fee upon arrival, which goes towards the maintenance of the road as well as care of the site itself. There are the equivalent of street stalls that make up the collection of structures at the top of the site, catch something cold to drink before hiking to the observation locations.

Hierve el Agua is, essentially, several formations of solidified mineral deposits that look like waterfalls on the side of a cliff overhanging a picturesque valley. The setting is stunning and unlike any other I’ve seen in Mexico or elsewhere . The only thing that comes close in my mind are the similar deposits and formations at Yellowstone, albeit on a much smaller scale than their cousin in Mexico.

Water (up to 80 degrees), with a lot of dissolved calcium carbonate (mainly) bubbles up through the ground and drains over the cliff, in the process leaving behind what appears to be a white pony tail, or cola de caballo. At one of the falls locations called “cascada chica”, there are mineral pools available for soaking and relaxing, or you can grab a spot nearby and watch those that do. The water that produces the falls are also form the chief water supply for the nearby communities of San Isidro Roaguia and San Lorenzo Alabarradas.

In true Mexico fashion, there is both fascination and danger with visiting Hierve el Agua. These are, after all, cliffside formations with no guardrails for visitors. And it is this danger that is the attraction: you are literally allowed (and encouraged) to walk on the tops of the formations and look over the cliff. Only the actual spots where the springs come to the surface are boxed off, and even there you can stand right on the location and watch the water bubble out from the ground. I’m sure under some provision of Mexico’s Napoleonic Code, if you slid or fell off the slick surface and went over the side, the fault would be your own and not some responsibility of the National Park Service.









You can hit the "full screen" button in the lower right corner of the video below (press escape to exit):






tricepilot screwed with this post 12-26-2010 at 07:43 PM
tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2010, 02:03 PM   #119
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Dent View Post
It's tempting to double back to take in Oaxaca. 3 and a half weeks just wasn't enough time to take in Mexico and all it offers. Next time.
Oaxaca and the state thereof probably needs at least a month to itself, IMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdon View Post
I Love those old solid wood doors. They must be at least 4" thick.
Very Cool!
Door and windows in colonial Mexico are an endless facination of stone, wood, paint, and the passage of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PirateJohn View Post
I can see myself now - bad Spanish, pulling out your map, comparing notes (and images) with the Transitos.
If you pull that off, for the sake on anonymity, please refer to me as Juan Pablo Montoya

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gitana View Post
...such a nice contrast to the gray, drizzly Seattle winter. I need a Mexico fix.
What about your house in the Yucatán?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buell78753 View Post
....and what's up with the bikes!

If you mean the posse that left out of Oaxaca for San Cristóbal and their crash and the bike left behind, I'll be getting to that story for sure...

Quote:
Originally Posted by farrell caesar View Post
How long can I resist the temtation to return
Your Mexico low-level light is lit. I know the feeling often.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajaRat View Post
Juan Pelota
One Pelota
One Ball
Lance Armstrong

So,

Did you name the pig Juan Pelota because he had one nut?

Inquiring minds want to know.
You're onto it. That's also the reason Lance named his bike shop's coffee shop Juan Pelota - a play on words and a nod to his medical past.

tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2010, 02:19 PM   #120
tricepilot OP
El Gran Payaso
 
tricepilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: San Antonio
Oddometer: 8,392
And Now a Pause for......

Our Spanish Word: Cojones

We often see common useful words misused or misprounced in spanish. One of these words is cojones, as in "I wonder if Tricepilot has the cojones to walk out to the edge of the falls at Hierve el Agua and look over the edge".

The most common mispronounciation of cojones is cajones, which among the cognocenti, means drawers - in the furniture sense. As with other Spanish words, a substitution of an a for an o changes the entire meaning of what you are really saying, although for the gringo, a kind listening audience often grants you a pass.

Cojones:



Cajones:




Link
tricepilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 12:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014