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Old 12-02-2010, 08:58 PM   #16
Snr Moment
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I need to start paying attention here as I have a slight tendency to over pack. Not a real problem on the road, but, as I get further and further off the tarvy, it's an issue. Gravity on a bigger bike is not your friend.

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Old 12-03-2010, 02:52 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snr Moment View Post
I need to start paying attention here as I have a slight tendency to over pack.


Understatement of the year!
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Old 12-03-2010, 04:55 AM   #18
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Camping on a WR250R...

Loaded for four nights camping about a month ago - Giant Loop + Wolfman tail bag for luggage. Gear included hammock, tarp, poles, 0F sleeping bag, downmat, jetboil coffee pot + cooking pot, all food, two quarts water, clothes and shower stuff, Kermit Chair, Polar Bear 12-pack cooler (with beer) and tools/tubes for basic roadside repairs.

I insist on bringing along my comforts.

Total weight of camping gear is about 35-45 pounds, depending on how much beer or water is aboard. I've added a stiffer spring on the rear with remote preload so I can crank it up when loaded and still have decent handling, albeit a bit top-heavy. The GL keeps the heaviest items at the ideal location - low and ahead of the rear axle.

En route:




At camp:

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Old 12-03-2010, 06:36 AM   #19
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good thread though it's all covered already in other threads. I can't post pic's here but his is my setup.

suzuki bandit 1250s with hard bags. rt bag holds my clothes. socks/underwear/t shirt rolled up together and compressed inside a gallon baggy. one for each day. i ride in leathers and only need shorts (2 pair) for the campfire part of it.

left bag is tire repair kit, mess kit, stove, gas misc.

large dry bag on seat/rack holds hamock, tarp, soft cooler walmart sleeping bag and OVERFLOW :) .

my stove is a heineken penny stove (google it) and fuel is from home depot. my coffee is in the form of "tea" bags. one large cup of water takes 2.5 minutes to boil from my penny stove using one ounce of fluid. i look for a store before the end of the day and pull out my soft cooler for beer, ice, english muffins, sandwich cheese, ect.

for fire started, i make my own. i use dryer lint and melt a cheap candle on it, rolling it up like a cigar as i melt the wax.

the hammock and tarp pack really small too vs a ttent.
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Old 12-03-2010, 07:43 AM   #20
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Jeez, that chain looks like it could use a little love
what can you POSSIBLY tell from that picture?

chain and sprockets were replaced after that ride though
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Old 12-03-2010, 10:30 AM   #21
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i understand this subject might have been talked to death, BUT i am talking ENDURO riding (off-road) and bikes that are NOT GS1200, KTM ADV, Vstroms, etc.

bikes that are thumpers..... 500cc and under (yes, my previous KLR i could pack a fridge on the back).

more so i am talking about bikes with aluminum (weak) subframes, and the NEED to pack light.

i also wanna know what you eat on the road, what you bring with you for food, how you plan your routes according to food/gas (smaller tanks), and do you primitive camp or find a campsite.

i plan on doing a few long distance camping trips on my KTM 525 (a big bike to some, small compared to a KTM ADV).

try not to flood this thread with negative responses. take that shit to Jo Momma.

now back to the subject
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Old 12-03-2010, 11:32 AM   #22
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Great thread! There is alot to be learned from the backpacking and bicycle touring crowds. The biggest difference, though, is on a motorcycle you will see civilization at least once a day to fuel up. No need to carry 8 meals, 5 liters of water, and a 12 pack of beer. Reducing consumables will cut quite a bit of weight and space off of your camp kit.

One of my favorite lightweight foods is couscous. Add a pouch of chicken (similar to the tuna pouches) and a squirt of olive oil makes a calorie dense meal that one person would have a hard time finishing.

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Old 12-03-2010, 11:51 AM   #23
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As for food products that minimize the prep, cook and clean up time while still providing tasty nourishment, I prefer the Mountain House product.

I've tried about every competitors product in this category and some have not even been of quality to feed the ravens.

http://www.mtnhse.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=M&Category_Code=MHDL

You need to try these at home and determine what agrees to your pallete prior to your adventure.

Another plus of this product is that you pour boiling water into the sealable pouch, let it cook and eat from the pouch which minimizes plates, bowls and any washing after eating.

This is the stove I use.. MSR Pocket Rocket which has its own storage container to prevent damage during non-use. weight 3 oz exluding fuel




I only bring one small cook pot large enought to boil at least 2 cups of water. Titanium cook pot by REI. .9L size

4.9 oz

http://www.rei.com/product/764181?preferredSku=7641810010&cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-datafeed-_-product-_-7641810010&mr:trackingCode=7C894FFE-FB85-DE11-B7F3-0019B9C043EB&mr:referralID=NA


I have two down sleeping bags both made by Marmot that have dry-loft outer fabric that resists moisture. The Colour (-5F, 3lbs 3 oz) and Pinnacle (15F, 2lbs, 12 oz ). Both are very compact while transporting due to high down fill content of 800+.

For ultra light trips I use a North Face Trek Bivy a single wall tent. 2lbs 7oz. This tent is extremely compact when packed. Not sure if they are still available but they may have been replaced by North Face with a new product of similar design. It is a two stake tent that can be set up on very hard ground which again reduces overall weight. Since you do not have to tack in 5 or 6 stakes your tent site selection becomes greater.. with more opportunity to stay in unique spots.




overnight set up..
Marmot Rain suit, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tarp, breakfast, flash light, butane lighter and tools in a waterproof stuff stack with tent in black stuff stack on top. About 10lbs including minimalist tools/tube for trailside repair.




This is the water purifyer I carry for mulit-day use.. Katadyn Ceramic Mini Filter.. Filters down to .2 microns. The filter easily cleans with a 3M scrub pad trail side. Filters that screen down to .2 microns will clog quicker in glacier fed or dirty run off water so cleaning ease is mandatory on mulitday trips with several individuals. The Mini filters out carriers of dangerous illnesses such as Giardia, Cholera, Typhoid, amebas, salmonella and others. Weight 8 oz and approx 6"x2"x3".






If I need optics I carry Leuopold compact 9X in military green with inidvidual eye adjustments. These were purchased back in 90's when top end Leuopold binocs had Leica lens. Weight about 10 oz. cost $750+. Fit in a 5"x2.75"X1.75" soft case.





For a camp light I use the Black Diamond Spot headlamp. 50grams w/o batteries

http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-us/shop/mountain/lighting/spot-2009


For navigation I use a Zumo 550 and if lengthly uncharted terrain will be encountered I bring along a small handheld, Garmin Summit.


More later....
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Old 12-03-2010, 12:24 PM   #24
Dilligaf0220
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How about hobo or twig stoves? Takes a little longer to heat up than a Jetboil but as a canoe camper that has found too many of those fuel bottles in the campfire pit I have an inbred hatred of all canister stoves. You can make your own hobo stove out of any medium-large steel can or go whole hog for the collapsible stainless steel production jobbies.

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Old 12-03-2010, 01:50 PM   #25
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Multi-day dual sport camp kit includes tarp, sleeping bag, matches, tools, tubes and rain gear.
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Old 12-03-2010, 05:50 PM   #26
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GREAT ideas so far guys


i'm going to keep post #1 updated with what i find and what others bring to the table.

i want this thread to be similar to the "toolkit thread" where it will be ongoing.


here's another inmates camping prep.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=566863
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Old 12-03-2010, 05:58 PM   #27
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Packing Light

Great thread, especially since I plan on taking my 525 EXC to Alaska next summer and have to pack light for that. I modified the Dirt Bagz rack from an '03 to work on my '07 (Pgs. 12 thru 14 on the 525 As An Adventure Bike thread). So far I am planning on a ultra light tent, sleeping bag, light mattress and freeze dried food heated with the jet boil. I will probably add the Coyote bag on top of the Dirt Bagz Ranger bags. That will be all I can take and still clear the seat with my leg. The 525 is a tall bike. And I have mine set up to run crazy fast. I will also take my DSLR and a few lenses in my Wolfman tank bag.

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Old 12-03-2010, 06:00 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu View Post
Great thread, especially since I plan on taking my 525 EXC to Alaska next summer and have to pack light for that. I modified the Dirt Bagz rack from an '03 to work on my '07 (Pgs. 12 thru 14 on the 525 As An Adventure Bike thread). So far I am planning on a ultra light tent, sleeping bag, light mattress and freeze dried food heated with the jet boil. I will probably add the Coyote bag on top of the Dirt Bagz Ranger bags. That will be all I can take and still clear the seat with my leg. The 525 is a tall bike. And I have mine set up to run crazy fast. I will also take my DSLR and a few lenses in my Wolfman tank bag.

Stu

what is the load/weight capacity on the 525 EXC?

i am going to buy the Coyote Giant Loop (i already have the MoJavi for day trips).
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Old 12-03-2010, 07:46 PM   #29
Pete O Static
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAZR View Post
i understand this subject might have been talked to death, BUT i am talking ENDURO riding (off-road) and bikes that are NOT GS1200, KTM ADV, Vstroms, etc.

bikes that are thumpers..... 500cc and under (yes, my previous KLR i could pack a fridge on the back).

more so i am talking about bikes with aluminum (weak) subframes, and the NEED to pack light.

i also wanna know what you eat on the road, what you bring with you for food, how you plan your routes according to food/gas (smaller tanks), and do you primitive camp or find a campsite.

i plan on doing a few long distance camping trips on my KTM 525 (a big bike to some, small compared to a KTM ADV).

try not to flood this thread with negative responses. take that shit to Jo Momma.

now back to the subject

I don't ride a smaller enduro, I ride an f800GS but I am a fanatical minimalist and hope I can offer you some good ideas. I can pack for an indefinite trip with just a set of wolfman dry saddlebags and the small double ended duffel. These would easily fit on your ride.

http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Saddle...ddle_bags.html
http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Expedi...nd_duffel.html

The double ended duffel looks big in the picture but the beauty of it is that it is totally adjustable to what you got in it.

First off, the shelter I carry is super light, small, freestanding ( with cross pole ) and has a vestibule. Weighs in at about 2lbs.

http://www.tarptent.com/moment.html

Add to that an air mattress to sleep on, a self inflating pillow and a first aid kit. These are what go into the duffel because they are the lightest and the duffel sits on the tail of the bike where I do not want weight. ( With the first aid kit located here in the double ended duffel, it is accessible no matter which side the bike has fallen on. )

For cooking, once again, minimalist and I like stuff that does double duty. I carry a surplus military cookset and mess kit. I have something like the BCB Crusader but I sourced the parts from a local supplier for about half the cost. Various fuels are easily found everywhere and you can even use twigs in a pinch. Along my travels, I have always been able to find various sources of fuel for the stove whenever I hit a town and re-provision.

http://thekittchensink.blogspot.com/...ok-system.html

This takes up about 25% of one bag. Along with that, I pack a mess tin kit. Again surplus. This doubles as a plate, frying pan and sauce pan. Between the two is my sleeping bag which is cinched down in a compression sack. This has now filled 50% of one of the wolfman bags or about 9 liters of space. Along the inside of the bag, standing on end is one of these: It is called a campsaw plus. Stores in a small tube and within minutes, assembles to a great camp saw which allows you to get enough firewood for an all night fire. Once that is done, it converts into a pot holder and with the optional grill, you can actually BBQ on the fire you just made with it. I have the grill in this bag also.

http://www.modernoutpost.com/gear/de...ui_campsaw.php

I even carry a chair! Because it is nice to sit by the fire. It lies on top of the sleeping bag and mess kit / stove.


http://www.alitedesigns.com/monarch-camp-chair-5



So now we have shelter, heat and a means to cook and we are only half way there as far as available space goes.

In the next bag, I pack clothing, toiletries and microfiber towel and a silnylon tarp which is kept in a dry sack. Clothing is done in layers and all synthetic. I carry 3 pairs of synthetic underwear, 3 pairs of synthetic socks, three synthetic shirts, 2 sweaters of varying warmth which can be layered together and a pair of synthetic pants which have zip off legs and convert to shorts. That all goes into a compression stuff sac and packs down to about the size of a grapefruit. Because everything is synthetic, it dies quickly so when I am in a lake or taking a shower, I am also washing out clothing with camp soap. It is dry by morning. Oh yeah and a pair of flip flops. I keep some space in the top of this bag for my riding outerwear. I have a Klim traverse and don't always wear the jacket, so I keep space in the top to stuff it when I don't need it.

As for food, I learned to drink tea without the milk and sugar. I am a huge coffee fan and camping coffee does not do it for me. I now actually quite like clear tea. Packets of oatmeal are real easy for breakfast. I try to eat fresh as much as possible by getting a banana or some apples when I pass through a town. I can also buy fresh in town and cook on the campsaw BBQ. I avoid fast food at all costs. For the other times when I am really away, I carry some of that boil in a bag curry or beef stroganoff.

Now for the fuel part and this will probably be the biggest challenge on a small enduro unless you have an extended range tank. I personally hate "tankering" fuel around in either small bottles or rotopax containers which require expensive and sometimes complicated mounting hardware. Again, trying my best to keep it simple, I carry a foldable bladder which I only use if I know I will need it. As soon as I have burned 2 gals out of my tank, the bladder gets emptied and folded back up.

http://www.justgastanks.com/store/in...oducts_id=1155

I have a tool tube down low on the crashbars, so I do not carry tools in the bags. With this setup, the bike is lean and clean, doesn't look like a pack mule and I can literally cross the country.

I hope that gives you some ideas.

Cheers
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:06 AM   #30
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Tent = alps mountaineering zephyr II, 100 bucks and packs to 6x18. It feels like pretty good quality

Sleeping Pad = exped syn mat 9 dlx, 120 bucks and packs very small. I bought the 9 because it is thicker, and the dlx because it is wider and longer, and the syn because the down was too much money. I am a side sleeper with a bum neck, so the sleeping pad is really important to me. This thing is worth the money and size. Blow up pillow completes the set.

Sleeping bag = Highpeak comfort pak 20. 60 bucks, it packs too big, but I wanted a bag that was not mummy (square bottom), was not down, had a hood and could be zipped together (for when the lady comes along). This met the requirements. If I was going to pack smaller, I would buy a new bag for sure.

pot and pan = Snopeak trek-900 aluminum, 20 bucks for a pot and pan. works good for water and small meals. I can cook some pretty good stuff in this setup

guyot squishy bowl and cup, packs small and cleans up easy. I also have a bunch of small containers from REI that hold salt, pepper, oil, eggs, etc.

Tringia alcohol stove, 20 bucks off ebay with a wind stopping stand. its not the hottest or fastest, but it will burn regular denatured alcohol, which can be bought from any store an earth. I carry fuel in 8oz plastic bottles from REI. Figure about 2-4oz per day.

Other = small tripod chair, towel, lantern,

Packing = Aerostitch soft bags, plus a 40L sealine zip duffel.

tent straps to KLR rack, sleeping bag and a few other odds and ends in one side, everything else plus other odds and ends goes in the other side. cloths and toiletries computer, ipad, etc. goes in duffel bag. Yes I camp off my KLR, which has a ton o space, but if I bought a new sleeping bag that packed small and a giant loop bag system, I could easily camp off my XR.

Food... I could go on for ever. A few favorites are can of chili and instant rice (vegi chili is good too) and eggs with dried potatoes. Can tuna, oat meal, mixed nuts, all make a good meal. Really the food thing comes down to what you feel like carrying. I find my self stopping for lunch and keeping half for dinner. Then all I need to carry is beer and after dinner snacks, which can be purchased at the last gas stop of the day. I will cook a dinner now and then. Mostly I use the cooking stuff for breakfast.

If your doing it right, this should be a constant learning process.
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