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Old 12-05-2010, 12:39 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by Dazed Productions View Post
Thanks, but I have seen the giant loop stuff and I am sticking with the Ortlieb plan. As for the stoves (this might not translate into american) there are those who use gas (butane/propane), those who use meths (Trangia stoves), and those who use proper fuel (petrol, paraffin). Pick your group and pick a stove. There will always be advocates for each class.

i originally wanted a GASOLINE (petrol) stove so i could just stick to ONE fuel for bike and stove, BUT i have heard if you are doing anything other than boiling water, your food sometimes picks up the GASOLINE (petrol) smell/flavor.

BUT if i was to go on a 2 week or more trip, i don't want to worry about WHERE i am going to get more fuel cannisters.


hmmmm.....
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Old 12-05-2010, 12:54 PM   #47
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as far as food goes, any of the dehydrated food is GREAT!

BUT what else do you carry?

i always pick up a potato or two when in town and you can do so many variation of meals with them and they don't bruise, they last for a long time.

the Starbucks VIA is the BEST thing to happen to camping !!!!!!
easiest thing to make. and i actually make mine COLD most of the time.
they have NEW ones that are meant to be ICED. http://www.amazon.com/Starbucks-VIA-.../dp/B003QKBDX4
they are lightly sweetened so no need to bring sugar packets (what i did in the past cuz i like to sweeten my coffee)

RICE is also an amazing ingredient to camping food.
whether you are preparing the dehydrated packs or fishing, or something else you got when in town, it cooks fast and can be carried ANYWHERE on the bike.

apples or oranges keep well and are great for energy.

Clif Bars are my choice when it comes to energy bars. they also have other products for electrolytes.

peanuts and trail mixes are great.

Snickers or Payday bars are good source of protein and carbs.

i only put water in my Camelbak because if i can't clean it right away i don't need to worry about bacteria.
and if i need WATER for a rag to clean my goggles, WATER to seat the bead when changing a flat, WATER for the inside of my helmet if it's HOT out, etc.

i got this "spice rack" at REI and my buddies laughed at me BUT were envious when they tasted my creations in the "kitchen".
http://www.rei.com/product/784120
with 6 spices available for storage, my choices are ....
1.salt
2.pepper
3.italian seasoning
4.cayenne
5.chili
6.garlic powder
a separate spice holder i put vegetable oil.

i got this "egg holder" for more close to town weekend camping trips where you can buy the eggs and eat them the next morning.
http://www.rei.com/product/696008

i'll think of more later....
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:13 PM   #48
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Tasty Bite (http://www.tastybite.com/) if you like Indian food/curry.
Comes in bags that you reheat in boiling water and can eat out of. Stuff is the real deal.

I shop a lot at health food stores and have found great organic gravy/sauce mixes without a hunderd chemicals in them to go over pasta & rice. Just add boiling water.

If I were to carry only one spice, it would be a shaker of Tony Chachere's Original Creole Seasoning. Essentially salt with cajun spices. Use on about any meats or veggies.

Cheese will keep a few days or longer, depending upon temperatures. Also will bring along the dry Italian salami, which will keep for days after being cut into.
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:31 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAZR View Post
i originally wanted a GASOLINE (petrol) stove so i could just stick to ONE fuel for bike and stove, BUT i have heard if you are doing anything other than boiling water, your food sometimes picks up the GASOLINE (petrol) smell/flavor.

BUT if i was to go on a 2 week or more trip, i don't want to worry about WHERE i am going to get more fuel cannisters.

hmmmm.....
Coleman makes two dual fuel stoves. The smaller more expensive one that REI sells and a slightly larger one that places like Walm_rt sell. I like the larger cheaper one myself. It has a larger tank. Start your trip with a full tank of Coleman fuel and you may not have to use much gasoline before you're done.
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:53 PM   #50
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That's about it. Hit a market before sunset to buy a little something dehydrated, instant brown rice, ramen noodles maybe a little 50 cent bag of frozen veggies but get to camp before they thaw too much. Use them to keep your beverages cold.

If you want to learn to catch and clean squirrel meat, I know a guy... Its ok to eat fish, cause they don't have any feelings. My tackle box fits in my wallet. Hooks, thread, float, bait. Weighs about a half an ounce. Garlic salt and pepper to taste.

You can run down to your favorite big box retailer and buy a $200 whiz-bang stove or you can go to the Army-Navy surplus store and get something smaller, lighter and fully bomb-proof for about $3 (three) My stove can also be used as an entrenchment tool should I feel the need to dig a hole to hide in.
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Old 12-06-2010, 02:10 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAZR View Post

BUT if i was to go on a 2 week or more trip, i don't want to worry about WHERE i am going to get more fuel cannisters.

Despite many years successfully using an MSR Whisperlite (not the multi-fuel/international version) for Alpine climbing trips, last year on the OBDR we had a couple of comical accidents with it (I won't go into the embarrassing details - they are in a thread somewhere in RR) but the end result was that we used 75% of the allotted fuel on day 1.

Most remote gas stations we stopped at had cannisters of isobutane but none had Coleman fuel.

I have a 3.5oz isobutane stove (SnowPeak) and a titanium pot that I've always used for backpacking. I was kicking myself for not bringing it.

I think if I was starting from scratch, I'd just get a JetBoil. If you need 2 pots for cooking, you're picking food that is too complex. I like the Tasty Bite's also. Too heavy for backpacking but excellent for motorcycle camping. I usually bring some Couscous and the combo is plenty of food for one person.

I just sold my 625SXC (Ortlieb panniers) and the next trip will be on my 450EXC with Coyote bag and PMB rack. Hopefully I can pack light enough so this thread is interesting.

Stuff I still need to do:
  1. lighten my toolkit for weight and volume
  2. new sleeping pad, right now I use a old Thermarest (no insulation) backed up by a Z-rest closed cell. Super redundant but takes up a lot of room. Thinking of a down KookaBay (not pictured) but punctures are a concern. I've fixed many a leak on the Thermarest but they always seem to fail at 3am sitting on cold snow
  3. new sleeping bag. I'll get a Mountain Hardware as I can get 60% off at the employee store, need to figure out what temp rating I need. Probably 15-20 degree down (have a 35 and 0 degree down). I use a silk liner which minimizes the oils from your skin getting into the down, meaning you can wash it less often and it's good for 5 more degrees.
  4. new tent. I have a BD BetaMid for snow camping, super light (1 pound) but you need to dig out a sleeping area, so that's not very useful on hard ground. Have an 10yo Kelty Clark that I use for m/c trips and backpacking but I think I can get lighter than 3.5 pounds and more importantly, less bulky. Curious on recommendations. Was thinking either single wall tent or a poled bivvy sack.
Most of this stuff (enduro camping) is a pretty good crossover from backpacking, except you don't see too many people telling you to cut the excess straps off your Coyote or shorten the handles on your wrenches
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Old 12-06-2010, 03:04 AM   #52
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luggage

Razr - hopefully you'll have plenty of fun on your 525 as it takes you from adventure to adventure.

In regards to luggage you seem to be looking at decent options. i've used the DirtBagz



and I like these if your trips are only going to be a few days. They are easier to to get on and off the bike than the GiantLoop and if you're a short arse like me it makes swinging your leg over the tall KTM a lot easier. I've owned both the original GiantLoop bag and the new Coyote that has great improvements in terms of zipper access and ease of mounting. Though the Dirt BagZ still mount a lot quicker and easier. Check the 525 as Adventure thread and there are pics of some simple brackets I made up that took thirty minutes to fab up. They are all you need with the DirtBagz and not some expensive custom tubes bent and welded up. Mine are still mounted on the bike, mount to existing bolts, and those brackets have been going for three years without sustaining any damage.


The GiantLoop bags work a charm and are my go to bag when the trip is longer than a couple days. The longest trip I've done unsupported so far is a three country month long off rode ride on the 525 and the Giantloop performed well and was able to handle all I needed for the trip including camping gear.



I used rubber straps to mount my Giantloop as its quicker and more secure than the current Coyote fastening method. I notice on my current Coyote the side pods of the bag flop about a bit, even when battened down. My old strap method was secure enough I could yank on the bag to pull the bike out of mud holes.


Overall the Giantloop products have been fantastic, having said that I would not overlook the DirtBagz if they suit your purposes better and are a short arse.

By far how ever, the product I have been most satisfied with has been the Wolfman Numberplate bag.


This bag originally started on my KLX 300 about 5 years ago and is still going strong.




I utilize it to store items I may need quickly like raingear, maps and snacks since I'm a type 1 diabetic. It has been hammered on the trails for many days a week for 5 years, through many countries and still shows no sign of wear and by far the best item for these types of trips I have found.

The Wolfman Enduro tank bag is another option but I hated the thing. It occupies space where I want to be when sliding forward on a dirt bike. When standing my crotch hits the thing. utterly useless for short arses like myself. Used it once and have never used it again.

Enjoy your rides.
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:35 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by team ftb View Post

By far how ever, the product I have been most satisfied with has been the Wolfman Numberplate bag.


This bag originally started on my KLX 300 about 5 years ago and is still going strong.




I utilize it to store items I may need quickly like raingear, maps and snacks since I'm a type 1 diabetic. It has been hammered on the trails for many days a week for 5 years, through many countries and still shows no sign of wear and by far the best item for these types of trips I have found.

The Wolfman Enduro tank bag is another option but I hated the thing. It occupies space where I want to be when sliding forward on a dirt bike. When standing my crotch hits the thing. utterly useless for short arses like myself. Used it once and have never used it again.

Enjoy your rides.

the number plate bag is my next purchase for sure. snacks, wallet, phone, maps, etc.

the tank bag is annoying for any off-roading, so i will use it only as an addition to storage if i REALLY need it.
i just hold onto it for the possibility on longer trips that i MIGHT need it but i will leave it if i don't really need it.

i'm not that short (5'11") , but even if the camping gear gets packed high, i have the ProMotoBillet kickstand that can withstand my weight if i need to put the kickstand down, and stand on the pegs to dismount the bike.
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Old 12-06-2010, 10:32 AM   #54
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What method do you use to keep the content of the numberplate bag dry?

How secure is it for woops?

Can you access the content easily after giving it a coating of offroad frosting?
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Old 12-06-2010, 10:36 AM   #55
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I'm average height and weight (6', 175 lbs) and have ridden the 525 almost 15,000 miles of extended off road trips. Everything from axle deep mud to skid pan deep poof dust in the deserts and mountains of the American west.



Back packing, winter alpine mountaineering and skiing are the roots of my minimalist kit. Choosing to ride with other KTM owners makes it even simpler as we share tools and spare parts although each rider is required to carry their own flat repair equipment and spare tube(s).



In the USA, we're never more than a day's ride from fuel so I'll occasionally grab a can of chili or soup to heat up on a fire. You gotta get gas pretty much every day so I'll supplement my freeze dried (Mountain House brand) meals with something canned or fresh when available. I also carry some flour tortillas in my tank bag which greatly extend my evening meals and usually there's enough left to make a little burrito for lunch the next day.



This was a 9 day, unsupported trip through Oregon and Nevada.

Big Agnes inflatable insulated sleeping pad

The North Face down bag (rated to zero)

The North Face Flight solo single wall 'tent' (love that thing and hate it too, 2.5 lbs, easy to set up, works really well in a stiff wind but if it's warm out, it sweats).

Various tools and KTM bits 6, 8, 10 mm bolts, etc.

Super light and easy to pack indoor soccer shoes. (I prefer an actual shoe vs. flip flops or Teva-type sandals as mine have toes for walking around in the desert).

Platypus gravity water filter. (I take care of the water for the whole group in exchange for some Jetboil time - we also carry a back up water filter like Pur or Katadyne depending on who's riding with us and what they own).

Frogtoggs rain gear - works as an additional layer if it gets cold around camp and is actually waterproof if you have to do some rain riding.

Silk long underwear - works really well, packs tiny and you can use the top for a bug net on your head.

I use the same set up on the XR6550R.



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Old 12-06-2010, 10:57 AM   #56
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Wachs, good description/detail.
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:32 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fast55 View Post
What method do you use to keep the content of the numberplate bag dry?

How secure is it for woops?

Can you access the content easily after giving it a coating of offroad frosting?
Fast55 the Wolfman numberplate bag is not waterproof. In it i carry raingear that can get wet, my maps are wrapped in a generic plastic bag and all my snacks are kept in Ziplock sandwich bags. This has worked through many monsoon seasons without issues.

If still concerned you can treat the bag with a water repellant treatment with something like this: http://www.surplusandadventure.com/shop/clothing/product-care-waterproofing/nikwax-waterproof-treatment-polar-475362.html

I have treated gaments and such with it and has worked decently.

The Wolfman bag fastens with two webbing and adjustable Fastex style buckles around the bottom fork tube clamps and two more adjustable webbing clamps around the handlebars (you do not need a crossbar for this bag to clamp properly). Once adjusted on the bike and cinched down (takes two minutes) the bag has not moved during my years with it. I have even carried two liters of fuel in the thing which is a heavy load and something I would not normally place in the bag but it handled it without any issues. The bag also has two half inch webbing straps across the front of the bag to keep the contents snug against the numberplate. here's another pic for reference that shows a different angle.


The bag in the above pick is not packed to its capacity.

In regards to zipper functionalitywhen dirty and muddy the bag has twin zippers mounted on the zipper rail and there is a fabric flap that covers the zipper quite well and despite the muddy dunkings it has received over here it has always remained easily accessable.

I dont have the three foot sand whoops over here that i did in my native southern California ( not enough off roaders over here to create whoops) but I would not hesitate to give it a go based on how it has performed for me over the years.

I referenced some homemade brackets I put together for my Dirtbagz a few posts above, here are some pics of the brackets I found. Note that they are minimal and unobtrusive.




When I first put together brackets this size on my KLX 5 years ago I was worried that the bags would not be supported enough to keep them out of the rear wheel, especially compared to the brackets that were sold for these bags. Five years later though and now hooked up to the KTM this style of bracket has not failed me or let the bag get into the rear wheel. The idea was to keep the bracketry to a minimum and therefore reduce the risk of damaging the brackets in crashes, which sadly I do far to frequently.



The DirtbagZ are supported primarily with the straps looped over the top of the seat and the brackets are only utilized to keep the bags from flopping about (which they do more than the GiantLoop bag) and from getting stuck in the rear wheel. So far they have worked well and quite simple to put together.

Great post Wachs!!! Thats is exactly the idealogy thats needed on these 525/530's to have them excel. Another alternative to compact shoes to pack if you want an actual shoe versus sandal is something like this: http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4162443

The back folds down easily so you can wear it like a flip flop if you like and the mesh material compacts quite well. I pack them with the soles facing out and positioned heel to toe. Wrapped together with a innertube rubber band they take up no more room than a single normal tennis shoe and weigh next to nothing.

Wachs - Have you or any of your buddies thought about the Nuetech Tubliss system as an alternative to tubes? i keep dreaming about the weight and space saved if I could ditch the innertubes out of my packing list. Hell even packing a couple extra Nuetech tubes you'd still be saving some decent space overall I would think.
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Old 12-06-2010, 11:14 PM   #58
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....

Wachs - Have you or any of your buddies thought about the Nuetech Tubliss system as an alternative to tubes? i keep dreaming about the weight and space saved if I could ditch the innertubes out of my packing list. Hell even packing a couple extra Nuetech tubes you'd still be saving some decent space overall I would think.

I have run the Tubliss system on my little bike for the last year. The biggest problem I have had with it is just not getting to ride enough. I have had the tires go flat while sitting and had to deflate them and wet the bead to get them to seal again, not a big deal at all but a bit inconvenient but I have not had a failure on the trail or the street. It is a small price to pay to not have to carry tubes or deal with them on the trail, just plug and go. Also, when I rode the Urban Enduro last Spring I had a flat for the whole thing. Not only did I ride the whole route but I rode home. The benefit of the whole wheel rimlock is priceless. Check the 2 noobs racing thread. Oregoncoast has had at least 1 failure but he is still sold on them and continues to use them. I got mine from Renazco Racing.

I'll add a link later...
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Old 12-07-2010, 02:47 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by RLK View Post






You can run down to your favorite big box retailer and buy a $200 whiz-bang stove or you can go to the Army-Navy surplus store and get something smaller, lighter and fully bomb-proof for about $3 (three) My stove can also be used as an entrenchment tool should I feel the need to dig a hole to hide in.
+1 for hexamine stove! No leaks, reliable, light.
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:33 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by crazybrit View Post
Most of this stuff (enduro camping) is a pretty good crossover from backpacking, except you don't see too many people telling you to cut the excess straps off your Coyote or shorten the handles on your wrenches

I do.

The one spanner I carry, other than an adjustable one, is cut in half. It's for adjusting the chain adjusters and has plenty of strength/leverage the size it is. I cut tags, labels, toggles, etc. that I don't use off my kit too. I started because I do this for backpacking, but it's habit forming. :)
It seems a bit extreme, but I used to keep a little bag of this stuff to remind me how it was worth doing. Like all weight saving, in isolation, it seems to not be worth it, but it does add up. It ended up being very little weight*, but the main thing I found was that all this stuff was a fair bit of pack volume. This is fine by me, within reason, I'm more into reducing pack size than volume on the bike.

I draw the line at cutting dehydrated food packet edges down more narrowly to save literally only a single gram, even when hiking. The time cost vs weight/size benefit is too small for me. To quote my father, "that sounds more like a mental illness than weight saving". At least when I trim tags from my tent, they're gone for the life of the tent and not just one use. Sometimes, depending on the contents and how long I'll be on a trip, I do put the contents of tins into food bags, but this is more to do with getting an easier to pack size/shape than a can. Many real ultralight minimalists do this to eliminate the need for a tin opener, but I have one on a Leatherman which I carry anyway, so that particular consideration is a non-issue for me.

*too little to be concerned with on a bike, but enough that I'd bother on a pushbike or hiking.
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