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Old 11-22-2012, 06:45 PM   #721
fetchfire
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Are your rolie bags just hanging by one side there? I can't get them in my country unless I pay a huge shipping cost so I got some sea to summit dry bags with tie down loops, I have quite a strong top rack that I could hang them off but not sure if they would flap around violently.
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Old 11-23-2012, 03:19 PM   #722
cyborg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fetchfire View Post
Are your rolie bags just hanging by one side there? I can't get them in my country unless I pay a huge shipping cost so I got some sea to summit dry bags with tie down loops, I have quite a strong top rack that I could hang them off but not sure if they would flap around violently.
Hi fetchfire,

The Rolies are strapped on with Wolfmans Rolie Bags Saddle Bag Mount system. 3 straps per Rolie, two on the sides and one end to end, very secure.





As for how I mounted them, see the links below.


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=155

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=167

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Old 11-23-2012, 03:46 PM   #723
tshelver
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Location: Beween here (SE Asia) and there (NH/VT)
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I was camping off my Husky TE610E, equipped with a rear rack and bag protectors.
Used a 50L Ortlieb dry bag to carry tent and allied equipment, stove and sleeping bag and associated stuff went in one Ortlieb saddlebag (the old 25 liter throwovers) and clothes and so on in the other.
WOflman dual sport tankbag for tools and heavier items.

That whole setup (excluding the racks, I am still working on that) is being moved to a Yamaha YBR125G, a 'dual sport' model made in China and imported into the Philippines and several other countries.

While that seems crazy, the bike has a higher carrying capacity than the Husky, and the saddle is actually bigger (wider and longer). A 3.2 gallon tank takes me over 240 miles if I am pushing it.

Bike is quite competent at trail crawling: low weight and low saddle height and narrow width let you go places that will give a rider on a 'real' adventure bike fits.

For a stove, it is hard to beat the Trangia system: http://www.trangia.se/english/5615.27_series_ul_ha.html. Alcohol, so you can get fuel around the world. Mine is a 30 year old knockoff, comes with an extremely efficient windshield / base / pot holder that makes up for the lower efficiency of alcohol. I've used it at 10,000 feet in sub zero temperatures without too many issues.
No need for plates as the Trangia comes with two pots and a fry pan, base / stove holder and windshield in one compact package.
No moving parts, no wearing parts, really robust, simple and easy to use. Very stable in all conditions.

For a tent, I've switched to a Nemo 3P. The extra space (50 square feet) costs only a pound in weight over the 2P. Great for tropical climes as well, with doors and mesh on 2 sides for optimal flow, and I don't get claustrophobia if I have to spend a few days in one spot.
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Old 04-03-2013, 02:54 PM   #724
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getting to be camping season again

Bump
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:05 PM   #725
nuggets
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Small bike loaded for camping.

This is my bike fully loaded ready to camp. I will not be wearing a backpack.


I have gotten the total gear weight down to 23.6lbs(10.7kg).

I am packing:

In side bags,
Hammock
Rainfly
Para cord
50ft small rope

Alcohol stove, cookpot, stand, spoon, Heet, lighter.
2 days food, coffee, and tea.
1 liter water
water purification tabs
first aid kit
water shoes
Tools and repair supplies

In dry bag
20 degree Sleeping bag
Change of clothes
sweater
long underwear

This setup keeps me pretty comfortable.

With this camp set up, I do not have any camping gear getting near my seating area, and do not have to wear a backpack. The bike also handles a lot better with a smaller load.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:27 PM   #726
UpST8
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Lookin good nuggets! Funny how I have acquired all this camping stuff over the years and now I find myself wanting to get smaller, smaller, lighter and lighter.

Still keep all the big stuff for when Mamma wants to go truck camping
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Old 04-29-2013, 08:29 PM   #727
nuggets
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Originally Posted by UpST8 View Post
Lookin good nuggets! Funny how I have acquired all this camping stuff over the years and now I find myself wanting to get smaller, smaller, lighter and lighter.

Still keep all the big stuff for when Mamma wants to go truck camping
Hah! Look at you slumming over in Thumpers!

I can help you go light.

Funny you say truck camping, I just got a big 2 burner coleman stove.
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Old 05-02-2013, 03:35 PM   #728
drikko
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Location: Brisbane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuggets View Post

I have gotten the total gear weight down to 23.6lbs(10.7kg).

I am packing:

In side bags,
Hammock
Rainfly
Para cord
50ft small rope

Alcohol stove, cookpot, stand, spoon, Heet, lighter.
2 days food, coffee, and tea.
1 liter water
water purification tabs
first aid kit
water shoes
Tools and repair supplies

In dry bag
20 degree Sleeping bag
Change of clothes
sweater
long underwear

This setup keeps me pretty comfortable.

With this camp set up, I do not have any camping gear getting near my seating area, and do not have to wear a backpack. The bike also handles a lot better with a smaller load.
No beer/port/rum??????
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:10 PM   #729
nuggets
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Originally Posted by drikko View Post
No beer/port/rum??????
Sorry no, can usually snag a night's supply at a gas stop.

I should have packed a bit more. That 20 degree bag was a lie. Cold at night.
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Old 05-03-2013, 05:15 AM   #730
duanew1
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A 20 degree bag will only keep you alive at 20 degrees. It will not keep you comfortable at that temperature. I am pretty sure that is the way the ratings work for sleeping bags.
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:58 AM   #731
nuggets
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Originally Posted by duanew1 View Post
A 20 degree bag will only keep you alive at 20 degrees. It will not keep you comfortable at that temperature. I am pretty sure that is the way the ratings work for sleeping bags.
True enough, but considering lows were mid 40's at worst, I should have been warmer. I have a 40 degree bag which has kept me warmer in similar weather.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:11 AM   #732
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Originally Posted by duanew1 View Post
A 20 degree bag will only keep you alive at 20 degrees. It will not keep you comfortable at that temperature. I am pretty sure that is the way the ratings work for sleeping bags.
That's the way rating works for "cheaper" sleeping bags. Quality ones will normally give you a "comfort" and and "lower limit" rating where the lower rating is roughly (although not exactly, the "exact" definition is the "temperate an average man can halfway comfortably get through the night while wearing a base layer and a hat") what you refer to here.

My 15 degree Marmot Helium (15F lower limit, 28F comfortable for women) was comfortable around 20F two years ago. But, and that's another big one: these ratings assume that you are out of the wind and have an insulating sleeping pad. So, as long as you don't put an insulation layer in that hammock, the rating won't even come close.
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Old 05-03-2013, 08:28 AM   #733
HaChayalBoded
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Here's a tip, do not carry the stove, cookpot or alcohol for it in the side bags. If the bike goes down you'll crush it all and have spilled fuel all over everything. Keep the squishy stuff in the side bags.

Of course this is if you are off roading, if you're on the street disregard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuggets View Post
This is my bike fully loaded ready to camp. I will not be wearing a backpack.


I have gotten the total gear weight down to 23.6lbs(10.7kg).

I am packing:

In side bags,
Hammock
Rainfly
Para cord
50ft small rope

Alcohol stove, cookpot, stand, spoon, Heet, lighter.
2 days food, coffee, and tea.
1 liter water
water purification tabs
first aid kit
water shoes
Tools and repair supplies

In dry bag
20 degree Sleeping bag
Change of clothes
sweater
long underwear

This setup keeps me pretty comfortable.

With this camp set up, I do not have any camping gear getting near my seating area, and do not have to wear a backpack. The bike also handles a lot better with a smaller load.
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:09 AM   #734
nuggets
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Location: Virgina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HaChayalBoded View Post
Here's a tip, do not carry the stove, cookpot or alcohol for it in the side bags. If the bike goes down you'll crush it all and have spilled fuel all over everything. Keep the squishy stuff in the side bags.

Of course this is if you are off roading, if you're on the street disregard.
This is my stove: http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....&postcount=267

It is small and tough, and the heet bottles are very tough also, so I am ok with letting them live in the side bags. I know a lot of other stoves would not do well in a crash.
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:49 PM   #735
bymbie
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Originally Posted by nuggets View Post
I should have packed a bit more. That 20 degree bag was a lie. Cold at night.
There is no mention of any kind us insulation underneath you... Hammocks are more sensitive to convective heat loss than traditional tent/tarp setups. At least you need a sleeping pad, but an under-quilt is preferred... Without that, your sleeping bag is relatively useless... No wonder you were cold.
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