ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool > Airheads
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-06-2010, 11:08 PM   #31
lulu
Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Location: Schenectady NY
Oddometer: 94
What worked for me was a lot of penetrating oil + heat + hammering on the bmw tool. I tried a breaker bar, but that was useless. I spent many days on that issue.
lulu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2010, 01:45 AM   #32
fishkens
Further...
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Oddometer: 5,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbasa View Post
Alloys are a blend of two metals, neither one of which has to be aluminum.

Steel is an alloy.
You are correct.

Apologies for the cross-thread (attempt at) humor.

"Alloy" ... does NOT mean ALUMINUM !

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=642533
__________________
Forging ahead, down a false trail.
fishkens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2010, 02:18 AM   #33
Beemerboff
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2005
Oddometer: 2,298
This topic came up somewhere else - consensus was impact was the thing , and that the flat spanner from the older Airhead toolkits was strong enough to move most.

I tried a 3 ft breaker , and couldn't shift the nuts on my G/S, but the flat spanner from the /7 and a belt from a rubber mallet freed them no trouble.

On my well worn G/S tightening down the centre cap nut changes the steering head bearing adjustment by almost a third of a turn , so when the time comes to reassemble the forks tighten it down in stages, checking the bearing adjustment as you do - no point in us both crushing a set of bearings------.
__________________
Adelaide Hills, Australia. 93 R100 GS, 77 R75/7 ,70 BSA B44VS, , 86 R80 G/S PD, 95 BMW Funduro F650 ST
Beemerboff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2010, 02:40 AM   #34
motu
Loose Pre Unit
 
motu's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2001
Location: New Zealand
Oddometer: 4,429
Mine came loose at the start of a 3 day ride last weekend.I tightened it with that short ring spanner in the tool kit (not my toolkit,the R90S on the ride had one) and it stayed for the 1,000km.Maybe I should check it again sometime.
motu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2010, 05:59 AM   #35
Beater OP
Mighty Unclean
 
Beater's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
Oddometer: 3,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper ST4 View Post
With a name like Beater, I'd a thought he got it figured out.
"That man has some strangely large wrists. Very strange"

__________________
Fred
'85 R80RT G/Sified <|> '91 R100GS Bumblebee (103K miles and climbing) <|> '73 R75/5 LWB
Airhead Zen: Ride - Repair - Ride - Maintain - Ride - Repeat
Beater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 11:31 AM   #36
DoktorT
BigBrowedNeandereer
 
DoktorT's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Chewelah, WA
Oddometer: 1,143
I Hve never had a problem loosening them with the toolkit wrench and blws from a big hammer. When one retightening, place a drop of paint on the perimeter of these nuts so you can monitor if one starts to looen. If it does, remove it and retorque it with 2 drops of blue loctite. If you see wear marks on the nut/topclamp from shuffling, consider adding abit of shim stock to take up slack betwen the hole and center nut flange. It is movement here that will loosen the nut over time. Remove that slack and reduce movement under load.
DoktorT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 11:59 AM   #37
danedg
Horizontally Opposed
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: U-puku-ipi-sing
Oddometer: 6,461
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazydrummerdude View Post
Ya know, I've read a lot about the advantages of using oil instead of water; introducing carbon into the steel, yadayada, but I've never done it.
why would you stick a red hot piece of steel into a bucket of volatile petrolatum?
__________________
51/3 , 60/2 , 60US , 74 Eldorado , R100M
The journey was comparatively uneventful. I never had to shoot anybody and nobody shot me!
danedg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 12:31 PM   #38
Beater OP
Mighty Unclean
 
Beater's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
Oddometer: 3,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by danedg View Post
why would you stick a red hot piece of steel into a bucket of volatile petrolatum?

Because we were all 14 once. Me personally lit a stick of dynamite and went fishing. Worked great. Didn't really need a reason (that made sense). Just something to do.

__________________
Fred
'85 R80RT G/Sified <|> '91 R100GS Bumblebee (103K miles and climbing) <|> '73 R75/5 LWB
Airhead Zen: Ride - Repair - Ride - Maintain - Ride - Repeat
Beater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 12:34 PM   #39
rkatapt
Indo-Kraut
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Dallas, TX
Oddometer: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by danedg View Post
why would you stick a red hot piece of steel into a bucket of volatile petrolatum?
For quenching...
rkatapt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 01:06 PM   #40
mark1305
Old Enough To Know Better
 
mark1305's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Oddometer: 5,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by danedg View Post
why would you stick a red hot piece of steel into a bucket of volatile petrolatum?

Because oil, as typically used in this scenario like good old motor oil, has a high enough flash point that it won't just burst into flame before quenching the workpiece to below ignition point. Sometimes you may get a little flash of flame at the surface, but the workpiece must be thrust in quickly so that it quenches and cools evenly. So even if you do see a flash, it quickly drowns out in the oil. In other words, oil isn't very volatile at normal temperatures.

Oil quenching, especially for pieces destined to be tooling or needing that kind of durability, typically provides a better hardening and temper than water which on some steels makes the piece too brittle and more care must be used in retreating to draw the temper of the steel.
__________________
Mark J
Merritt Island, FL

When a person asks you for advice, they don't want advice. They want corroboration.
mark1305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 07:51 PM   #41
fishkens
Further...
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Oddometer: 5,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
Because oil, as typically used in this scenario like good old motor oil, has a high enough flash point that it won't just burst into flame before quenching the workpiece to below ignition point. Sometimes you may get a little flash of flame at the surface, but the workpiece must be thrust in quickly so that it quenches and cools evenly. So even if you do see a flash, it quickly drowns out in the oil. In other words, oil isn't very volatile at normal temperatures.

Oil quenching, especially for pieces destined to be tooling or needing that kind of durability, typically provides a better hardening and temper than water which on some steels makes the piece too brittle and more care must be used in retreating to draw the temper of the steel.
I was just thinking the same thing...sort of. But yes, my dad sometimes did this when heat treating steel. He knew, I just watched.
__________________
Forging ahead, down a false trail.
fishkens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2010, 08:21 PM   #42
mfp4073
Beastly Adventurer
 
mfp4073's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Central Florida
Oddometer: 2,343
is there any reason i could not use a big impact gun? I have a half inch drive northern tool "big boy" that would probably do the job. Just have not seen much mention of power tools and wanted to make sure there was not a reason for it.
__________________
1974 BMW R90/6 Bettie #1, 04 Triumph Bonneville
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Blank
loner, lonegunman, get it. That’s the whole point. I like the lifestyle, the image. Look a the way I dress.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil View Post
Cavemen must've designed them shortly after inventing the wheel.
mfp4073 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2011, 11:28 AM   #43
vacantstare
Gnarly Adventurer
 
vacantstare's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Oddometer: 294
I just spent a week struggling with this, and I want to reiterate that the flat BMW wrench, a hammer, and heat are the way to go. I bought a properly faced 6 point 36mm socket, and came very close to rounding off the left side with it. The fact that the torque is being applied 2" above the nut makes it very hard to keep the socket properly seated on the nut.

I ended up draping soaking wet rags over everything that might melt, torching the nuts, then hammering on the flat wrench. Even after they 'broke loose', I needed substantial leverage for the first couple of turns. I think someone actually put locktite on the threads...
vacantstare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2011, 03:59 PM   #44
mark1305
Old Enough To Know Better
 
mark1305's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2005
Location: Merritt Island, FL
Oddometer: 5,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfp4073 View Post
is there any reason i could not use a big impact gun? I have a half inch drive northern tool "big boy" that would probably do the job. Just have not seen much mention of power tools and wanted to make sure there was not a reason for it.
Yep, I'd use that. Just make sure the socket has had the chamfer ground down flat as shown in Post #11 in this thread and that it is seated flat down before pulling the trigger.
__________________
Mark J
Merritt Island, FL

When a person asks you for advice, they don't want advice. They want corroboration.
mark1305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2011, 05:51 PM   #45
mfp4073
Beastly Adventurer
 
mfp4073's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Central Florida
Oddometer: 2,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305 View Post
Yep, I'd use that. Just make sure the socket has had the chamfer ground down flat as shown in Post #11 in this thread and that it is seated flat down before pulling the trigger.
Problem solved then! This thing works so good, that it doesnt even seem like it uses a lot of force to do the job. Have been really surprised at several of the things I have tackled with it.
__________________
1974 BMW R90/6 Bettie #1, 04 Triumph Bonneville
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Blank
loner, lonegunman, get it. That’s the whole point. I like the lifestyle, the image. Look a the way I dress.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil View Post
Cavemen must've designed them shortly after inventing the wheel.
mfp4073 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014