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Old 12-07-2010, 11:30 PM   #16
Petrolburner
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I used to race XC mountain bikes, but I've never raced motos. I have a KX125 that I would like to race, but I'm not sure if I can afford to trailer it to Washington to race. If I can build some skills on the bike over the winter I'll try a few. I've got pretty much everything I need to get started, bike, truck, 6x12 enclosed trailer, and old enough to know better but still too young to care! I just need a bit more gear and some $$$ for fuel and I'm in. Anyone in the Bend/Redmond area volunteer for pit crew?
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Old 12-08-2010, 12:05 AM   #17
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I got back into riding in june of 08 along with my son who was 10 at the time. In 09 my son rode his ttr125 at Hannegan in the nonconforming class and had a great time, so much so that this year he took the 85cc beginner class champ trophy on his 85xc he has also won 2 kids harescrambles and has placed in the last Kilted Duck and the Webbyfoot Enduro. I on the other hand have shied away from the MX scene but have entered most of Hannegans scrambles and most recently took 2nd in senior B @ the 80th Cowbell (that was my first trophy in 35yrs BTW). I honestly love racing but have to remind myself about work on monday.I also love being "Team Dad" for the kid so either way I'm in hog heaven and can't wait for next season!!
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Old 12-08-2010, 01:57 AM   #18
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Great thread idea! I'd like to check into some light racing.

It'd be swell to have some kind of brief intro to what the different race styles are all about.


I've copied the below wholesale from the OMRA site, but maybe there's a better explanation... like what I want to know is do I need a roll-chart or do I just look for ribbons and arrows until the sweepers pick me up?

CROSS-COUNTRY DEFINITION:
A cross-country event by definition consists of no less than 70 total ground miles. The OMRA uses the Banner-Drop System, i.e. if a starting banner is used, when it is raised, shut off your engine, and when it falls, GO! The race is over at the checkered flag and the first rider through (per class) is the winner, second rider is second place and so on.

GRAND-PRIX DEFINITION:
Grand-prix rules are the same as the cross-country rules with the only exception being that a grand-prix course consists of less mileage or a shorter course.

EUROPEAN SCRAMBLES DEFINITION:
A European Scramble is defined as a mass start cross-country type event. It shall be run over a closed 6 to 16 miles in length with each event of definite time duration, minimum of one hour and a maximum of one and one-half hours in length. Events must consist of separate races for each division.

ISDE DEFINITION:
The OMRA ISDE Rules (starting 1997) are the same as the AMA/FIM rules to better facilitate NW riders who try to qualify for the U.S. International Six-Days Enduro (ISDE) Team. Click here to get the official 2003 AMA Rules (.PDF format - see ISDE section 'J').

A Reliability Enduro is a meet designed to measure the reliability of the machine and the skill of the rider involved during the time of the event. The rules of participation will be the same as the AMA/FIM rules used in Enduro competition. When public roads are used, all traffic laws, including speed, must be observed and anyone who receives a citation for a moving violation will be disqualified. The rules governing this type of event favor the "GO FAST" attitude. The timing or speed average established for each section, check-to-check, is a measurement of the rider's ability to cover the distance as prescribed. These averages will vary depending on the terrain challenges of the route. To ease the minds of those not familiar with the format of an International Six-Day Enduro, you do not need a speedometer or a watch, like a timekeeper style enduro. The special test sections are very important, as they will measure your riding capabilities and are a determining factor in who the winner is.

WORKER POINTS
65 Worker Points will be awarded for one event in a particular series, including dualsport. This applies to ONE event only of your choice! This is to spur participation by the riders in helping with an event, since often times events can be shorthanded. Just call up the host club ahead of time (if you are not a member of the club) and ask if you can help. It is up to the rider to be sure that their worker points are sent in to the OMRA points director by the hosting club. If the rider does not follow through with this, they risk not receiving their worker points.
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Old 12-08-2010, 03:36 AM   #19
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All sorts are showing up. Sweet!


Here's a map I made last year of the race locations. It's the OMRA races and the Desert 100. It's about right, just to give an idea of driving distances. Speaking of driving, carpooling will save a pile of money that you can turn around and blow on bike parts. Plus, you get to bench race on the drive back.




Petrolburner; Goldendale is about as close to you as can be in WA. There are also a bunch of races right around Bend. I think you can practice in Millican Plateau, which would be a good place to get used to the terrain. (read: whoops and rocks)


Kaptenken; Just FYI, if you and your son come down to race in Oregon, at most of the venues he'll need an escort rider. This will presumeably be you. The good: You get to race with him. The bad: If you can't keep up with him, he'll have to wait for you at the checkpoints. You'll both need a 'Safety Card' too.

Which reminds me.... Everyone who rides dirt bikes in Oregon (racing or not) will eventually be required to have an atv safety education card. This year it is anyone under the age of 40 or anyone escorting a minor. It's 'Free'. It just takes time. Get it here: http://www.rideatvoregon.org/index.cfm
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:27 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by motorzen View Post

It'd be swell to have some kind of brief intro to what the different race styles are all about.
All the races are on marked courses, there's no navigation.

Ok. I'll skip the European Scrambles because I don't think there were any last year. The Grand Prix is pretty much track racing. Most of the races this year are on a groomed track, and the ones that aren't are on an actual track are on a short loop, so you repeat the same terrain over and over again. The races are usually 1.5 hour plus a lap. Meaning, you ride laps until the workers at the checkpoint tell you to stop. This will be after 1.5 hours from the start time. When stopped, you'll line up at the finish booth and get scored based on how many laps you did and the order you finished.

I only did one GP, but my impression is that if you like the idea of MX -doing laps on a track- but want a longer race and don't want to do big jumps, then this is the race for you.



This is Eddieville. It's a groomed track around 10 miles long. Half the GP races will be here. There will also be one XC race here, which for this track is run the same as a GP race, except that it is 2.5 hours.





Races in the Cross Country series are held in a variety of terrain, mostly natural, and the format is whatever suits that terrain. There are desert, woods, and a couple of track courses. It can be a Hare Scramble format, which is just like a GP. This is done when the race is on a track or on a short woods course. It can also be a fixed distance of one or more laps on a course. On the multi-lap distance races there is still a time limit of some sort, so if you're really slow you don't have to do the whole race but you'll still get a score instead of a DNF.


You don't really need any advance knowledge to do the race. Just sign up, listen at the rider's meeting and then go race. Start and stop when they tell you. And if the scoring isn't electronic make sure you don't lose your place in line at the finish.



There are a few ISDE events in the XC series. These are timed races, where people start a few at a time, instead of one class all at once. There are checkpoints along the course where your time is recorded. The idea is that you ride the course at a trail pace and go through the checkpoints at a particular time. Most people get to the checkpoints early, wait around at the entrance and then go through at the right time (there's a clock displayed at the checkpoints). There are penalties for going through the checkpoints early or late. Also, if you go through a checkpoint early or late, your time changes for the next checkpoint by the amount you were early or late. The distances and times of the checkpoints are posted before the race, and it's nice (but not necessary) to have an odometer and watch so you can pace yourself. The course workers take care of keeping track of your time, and they write it on a scorecard which is taped to your fender, so you can look at it and figure out if you need to adjust your checkpoint times.

Within the course there are racing sections called tests. You'll get to the start of a test where there's a checkpoint, where they'll send one racer through every 30 seconds, from there you race through the test to the end of the test. You then resume your trail pace to the next regular checkpoint.


Sound complicated, but it's easy the second time. It was easy my first time too, because I couldn't keep up with the pace set by the checkpoints. So I just rode as fast as I could through the entire course.



Just to make things more complicated, there's another style of enduro that's similar to ISDE but simpler. In this one, there are an even number of checkpoints on the course, and you race from the start to the first one, ride trail pace from the first to the second, race from the second to the third, etc. The times that you are supposed to go through the checkpoints are fixed, so you if you're early or late through one checkpoint you don't change to the time for the rest of them.


Have I scared anyone off yet?
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Old 12-08-2010, 08:20 AM   #21
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Luke, Great idea and very cool thread.

Thanks
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Old 12-08-2010, 08:25 AM   #22
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I'm going to justify racing as an excuse to explore Oregon, so now I'm officially in! One important question, I don't fly back in to Redmond until Saturday morning, are many of the races on Saturday? I looked at a few in XC schedule and many appear to be on a Sunday, is that the norm?

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Old 12-08-2010, 10:45 AM   #23
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Well, I'm at a point were I want to try a XC race or hare scramble. I'm not that good of rider but think a race would be a hoot. I do work on my riding and try and improve every time I go.
this is where i'm at. went riding with luke a little this year, he and his xr400 was WHIPPING me and my 200xc-w. if i can do some, it'll definitely be in the beginner class. i just want to see what it's all about!
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Old 12-08-2010, 03:22 PM   #24
Luke OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrolburner View Post
I'm going to justify racing as an excuse to explore Oregon, so now I'm officially in! One important question, I don't fly back in to Redmond until Saturday morning, are many of the races on Saturday? I looked at a few in XC schedule and many appear to be on a Sunday, is that the norm?

Trevor

Yes, I think all the 1 day XC events are on Sunday.
For the two day events:
Timber Mountain, Fall Classic and MRA: There is a race for everyone on Saturday and on Sunday. You don't have to do both races, but it makes the driving more worthwhile.
Funky Chicken and Monkey Butt: Different classes race different days. For the Funky Chicken, the slow classes race Saturday, the fast ones on Sunday. For the Monkey Butt there's a kid's race and a marked trail ride on Saturday, and all the adults race on Sunday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clapped_r6 View Post
this is where i'm at. went riding with luke a little this year, he and his xr400 was WHIPPING me and my 200xc-w. if i can do some, it'll definitely be in the beginner class. i just want to see what it's all about!
You're a lot faster than I was a year ago. The hard races aren't until the middle of the season, so there's plenty of time to practice.
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Old 12-09-2010, 07:29 PM   #25
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Thumb Cool Thread

I loved the race like noob thread and this goes right along with it!

In 2003 two ladies contacted me wanting me to join their teams, to ride a 24hr. race. I thought about it and decided to try it. Alan thought I was crazy to start racing at a 24 hr. race but supported me. It turned out neither team had enough gals so the two melted together. Close to the 24hr. I realized I had committed to race my first race during the dark I met one of my team mates and we raced a GP at starvation ridge in preparation for the actual 24 hr. race. We were the only Ladies team at the 24 but it was a blast and I was hooked.

2004 I decided to try the Desert 100 since I loved riding the Juniper dunes area. Alan gave me one of those deer in the headlights looks and then got on board. I did pretty well and made some lifelong friends at that race.

After the Desert 100 I decided to race a series before I got to old (I was already on the highside of 40). I chose the OMRA GP series since most of the races were on Sat. I wouldn't miss church and it wasn't as much driving as the cross country series. At first my goal was to finish every race, after about three wins I decided I wanted to place in the top 3, eventually I set a goal to actually win the series. I ended the series with a perfect score saving my throw out for the last race.

I raced at Longview twice along the Columbia Cool Track!! along with Washougal, Eddieville, and Starvation Ridge. Many of the races I went by myself there were always friendly guys offering to help me load and unload my bike. They were stoked to see a lady rider at the races, many of the guys I would later see at Gifford Pinchot or Tanuem/Naches riding areas.The series was a lot of fun, I made alot of new friends.

I highly recommend The OMRA series, Desert 100, or OTBG races to anyone wanting to race. All are a class act. You won't regret the experience!
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Old 12-09-2010, 10:51 PM   #26
kaptenken
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke View Post
All sorts are showing up. Sweet!


Here's a map I made last year of the race locations. It's the OMRA races and the Desert 100. It's about right, just to give an idea of driving distances. Speaking of driving, carpooling will save a pile of money that you can turn around and blow on bike parts. Plus, you get to bench race on the drive back.




Petrolburner; Goldendale is about as close to you as can be in WA. There are also a bunch of races right around Bend. I think you can practice in Millican Plateau, which would be a good place to get used to the terrain. (read: whoops and rocks)


Kaptenken; Just FYI, if you and your son come down to race in Oregon, at most of the venues he'll need an escort rider. This will presumeably be you. The good: You get to race with him. The bad: If you can't keep up with him, he'll have to wait for you at the checkpoints. You'll both need a 'Safety Card' too.

Which reminds me.... Everyone who rides dirt bikes in Oregon (racing or not) will eventually be required to have an atv safety education card. This year it is anyone under the age of 40 or anyone escorting a minor. It's 'Free'. It just takes time. Get it here: http://www.rideatvoregon.org/index.cfm
That's good to know and a worthy requirement.When he races and I don't (working a checkpoint) we can usually find someone willing to keep an eye on him and he knows that under no circumstances is he to leave the marked course. I can see the safety card showing up here in the near future.
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Old 12-10-2010, 02:08 AM   #27
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Yes! Great thread... I'm eager to learn more.

I wonder if there might be someone who would adopt me and show the ropes? Be my big-racing-brother?

Since I'm in Seattle... I'd be more likely to make it to Washington-ish events. Should I be looking at something other than the NMA Website?
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Old 12-10-2010, 07:52 PM   #28
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This is perfect! Count me in for a few races. I need to put a bigger tank on the YZ or get myself a KTm 150 or 200.
I would also be interested in some get together trail riding or MX practice tracks. Any riding is good riding!!!
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Old 12-10-2010, 10:26 PM   #29
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Yes! Great thread... I'm eager to learn more.

I wonder if there might be someone who would adopt me and show the ropes? Be my big-racing-brother?

Since I'm in Seattle... I'd be more likely to make it to Washington-ish events. Should I be looking at something other than the NMA Website?
We would be more than happy to show you around the North end races such as the Hannegan stuff in Bellingham- "Toasted Hare ,Dirty Dog, Lost Filthy pup, all hare Scrambles .Then there's the Walker Valley venue, Kilted Duck, Webfoot Enduro and the Cowbell. I'd even show you around WV so you can prepare for the mental and physical anguish you would experience in any of the events held there.
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Old 12-10-2010, 10:27 PM   #30
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Great Thread Luke!

I plan to make as many of these events as possible. Its a little harder being way up in N. Idaho to make some of the events, but I'll definitely make:

Desert 100
China Hat ISDE
Devil's Head ISDE
Monkey Butt HS

Maybe some of the other Bend Races.

Plus, not on this list but the Paisley 400 race down in Paisley, OR

Last, but certainly not least.... the Mexican 1000. Though as a spectator/Pit Bitch

For some of the big races like Desert 100, we ought to set up the ADV pits...
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