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Old 01-07-2014, 12:19 PM   #2416
tragerbon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdrocks View Post

i don't remember you saying the tank on your Versys leaked after removing the fairing brackets. i had to use a jeweler's loupe to find the tiny hairline crack at one of the upper spot welds so i could solder it. i stayed away from the spot welds on this new tank, and just trimmed enough of the brackets so they wouldn't interfere with the fill.
When I went back to Houston to pickup the bike, I noticed a small paint bubble and thought the paint guy must have screwed up, after looking further into the bubble....pop, my bubble burst too : (.

It's all part of the learning process : )
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Old 01-07-2014, 10:31 PM   #2417
jdrocks OP
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When I went back to Houston to pickup the bike, I noticed a small paint bubble and thought the paint guy must have screwed up...
i blamed it on the paint guy too at first, but then i blamed it on the auto body guy.

yeah, the dreaded paint bubble, except i had a near full tank of fuel and compounded the problem by applying the "guaranteed" fuel proof two part epoxy fuel tank leak fixer...by this time, you can't be still wondering if it worked. actually, it did work for about 6000 miles, then it didn't. i think i was in Watson Lake at the time, ya know, just around the corner from the shop.

i eventually fixed it the right way, but ran 5000 miles on the way back from the Yukon wondering if the bike was going to catch on fire. naw, it wasn't really that bad, it only leaked when i had more than 4 gallons in the tank, and i was running so hard i didn't have more than 4 for very long after a fill.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:29 PM   #2418
nononsense4857
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JD,
No Wolfman's this time around?
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:51 PM   #2419
jdrocks OP
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i've run both 300mm and 310mm rotors on the front, and now have a 320mm mounted. each size requires a different caliper adapter, fun making those. previously, i ran the ER6/Versys 2 pot Tokico, but wanted to fit the 4 pot Tokico if i could fab an adapter.

2 pot left, 4 pot right.



plenty of DRZ riders use 320mm rotors mated with commercially available billet adapters. with the offset of the 4 pot mounting points, the adapter is not just a spacer, but a double sided mount that changes the usual simple fork leg to caliper connection. the commercial adapters wouldn't work with my setup because the hub width/spacers are different compared to the OEM DRZ. i looked at it, looked some more...the heck with it for the time being. maybe there's a different 4 pot that would work better.

the OEM caliper stops the bike just fine with the big rotor, so i made another spacer to fit the 320mm rotor. besides the caliper to rotor fit, there are 2 sets of holes that need to be located and drilled with precision. starting with the caliper mount on the fork leg, these are drilled and tapped M8 first on the spacer blank. if these first two holes aren't right, it's scrap, start over.



the blank is removed so accurate measurements can be made with the caliper sitting on the rotor. transfer the measurements to the blank, drill another set of holes for the M10 caliper bolts. if these two holes aren't right, it's scrap, start over.

if everything checks out, the blank is clearanced to fit the caliper.

320mm spacer left, 300mm spacer right. i clocked the 320mm spacer a little so that the caliper is mounted higher.

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Old 01-08-2014, 09:57 PM   #2420
jdrocks OP
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Originally Posted by nononsense4857 View Post
JD,
No Wolfman's this time around?
i have a set of new style Berg Briggs' hoops for the Expeditions, but i have to build the tail before i fab mounts for the racks so i don't run into interference issues.

jdrocks screwed with this post 01-10-2014 at 05:15 PM
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Old 01-10-2014, 06:01 PM   #2421
jdrocks OP
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the new spacer mounted.



if you look at the photo of the old spacer used with the 300mm rotor, you can see that clocking the layout moves the caliper up and farther away from contact with any obstacles. what's not apparent from the photo of the new spacer is that the layout has been simplified by making the two primary layout lines perpendicular.

now that the lines sit at 90 degrees, the top layout line is easy to transfer to the rotor and marked with a sharpie. when the caliper is slipped onto the rotor it can be rotated over your mark on the rotor, and from there you can accurately measure the spacing between the top M8 and M10 mounting bolts. it takes a little fiddling to locate the bottom M10, but once you accurately mark an elevation centerline square to the back of the spacer blank, the bolt center can be determined by applying the bolt spacing measurement lifted from the caliper. the intersection is the lower M10 bolt center.

remember, the marks are the spacing with the caliper tight on the rotor, so the bolt centers need to be moved over a couple mm, while still maintaining correct caliper bolt spacing. the bolts connecting the caliper to the spacer are now M10x15, anything longer will hit the rotor face or buttons.

i've probably made it sound way more complicated than it is, but if you can read a metric scale and use a carbide scribe, the spacer is not a difficult piece to fab. don't try it with an inch scale and pencil.


in contrast, the small caliper spacer needed for the rear wheel is very easy. as a matter of fact the whole freakin' SV 3 spoke rear wheel swap is easy.



prime and paint, got brakes on both ends.
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Old 01-14-2014, 05:56 PM   #2422
jdrocks OP
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i've started connecting all the electrical beyond engine management, but with added lights, circuits, and relays, it's not plug and play, especially since the main harness is ER6, not Versys. some of the pieces...



the signals are common to several Kawasaki models, and i'm not sure if these are ER6, Versys, KLR, or what, but they were on the shelf, have the keyhole mount and are short so they won't interfere with the pannier racks. these will plug right into the ER6 harness. i'm also going to use added pairs of LED marker lights again, so i'll leave a couple spare pigtails for those so i can connect them in the future. likewise, i'll add a pair a LED brake lights to suppliment the OEM brake/tail unit, but i don't have these in hand yet, my usual source was out. the LED license plate light (upper left) was spliced on to the OEM pigtail, now it will plug into the harness.

also upper left is an LED pilot light, very bright, and this light is connected to the dedicated auxiliary light circuit. the circuit is not connected to an OEM key-on circuit, either relay or power, so the pilot is important. i always want these circuits and switches separate, ya could lose one light circuit, hopefully you won't lose both main and aux.

this bike does not really have a dash panel or other conventional mounting surface on the front, but i made a little room for the pilot light, and also a spare switch, another feature i always incorporate.



this WP toggle is not connected to anything, but is mounted with a long pigtail including a SAE 2 prong connector, ready to go if needed.

the 10ga conductors used for an auxillary circuit are armored all the way from the battery forward, and use a marine grade gasketed fuse holder.



the OEM tail/brake were tied into the harness with a splice and are operational.

so that's the rear of the 649, the connections on the front are all custom...except for the horn, that's plug and play.
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Old 01-15-2014, 01:35 AM   #2423
Homerb
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The turn signals are identical to my Versys signals.
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Old 01-15-2014, 06:53 AM   #2424
jdrocks OP
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The turn signals are identical to my Versys signals.

yeah, the step child Versys gets the hand-me-down ER6 signals along with the 08 up KLR. the late model Versys got the second gen ER6 signals 3 years later, so it goes. the same signal also comes with the amber lens, but looks much better in clear, as on your build. i'm using a mixed set front and rear, it's what i had handy.

your moto lookin' good, but i'd add some protection at the instruments, an expensive and inconvenient bit to break, even down under.

i've seen a another version of that expansion tank somewhere...
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:04 AM   #2425
Yella DR
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Thanks for sharing all the details and reasons why you do it. I do ask what is the pilot light for?
I enjoy my DR650 but it might soon be replaced with a smoother gravel runner like yours...
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:10 AM   #2426
jdrocks OP
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Originally Posted by Yella DR View Post
Thanks for sharing all the details and reasons why you do it. I do ask what is the pilot light for?
I enjoy my DR650 but it might soon be replaced with a smoother gravel runner like yours...
the red LED pilot light is tied to the relay controled LED auxilary light circuit and is the "ON" indicator, very important, since the relay is not connected to an OEM "switch-ON" circuit. the concept is to have the auxiliary lights 100% independent of other fused circuits on the moto, obviously contrary to how most lighting relays are wired. a pilot light in the switch itself could be used, but i like the pilot light directly in front of me while in the saddle. the LED is daylight visible.

...which brings up another subject, "Why a 30A relay for LED auxiliary lights, ya don't need one?" easy answer there, those fancy LED auxiliaries are usually in a more exposed mounting position and may end up in pieces with any mishap, even minor. best to design that switched lighting circuit as if you're using 35, 55, 85, or whatever wattage conventional light you can get your hands on, because that might be the light (or lights) that allow you to advance on a trip...or get you home, maybe both. it's a subject i know something about, unfortunate in the incident, but fortunate in the proactive planning. 2700 miles on the independently switched auxiliary lighting circuit, the OEM lighting circuits a wiped out mess of shorts and blown fuses, the main lighting gone.

i have a bunch of friends with the DR650, and they all love that moto...but they also have other bikes for travel. i'm more a one bike guy, so my travel bike has to be a gravel runner, and all around capable.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:58 AM   #2427
Yella DR
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I understand now. I also use relays for the similar reasons but they get energized by an ignition switched source.Pilot light or not- I'd hop off my bike and leave them on anyway...but having them independent from the lighting circuit is wise.
I also have a very capable slab runner with way more thrust than is required and I now know that a copy of your build can replace both. I could still fully enjoy my types of riding at a fraction of the cost.

You've inspired many here including myself and I thank you.
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:46 PM   #2428
jdrocks OP
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...I also use relays for the similar reasons but they get energized by an ignition switched source...
the way you have the relay energized is by far the most common, and is foolproof, with the aux light relay powered off at the key, but...

for a travel moto/gravel runner, i'd rather keep them separate. Las Vegas odds say that if you're out there long enough and far enough, you're going to need that separate circuit, relay, and spare switch. i think i already mentioned having the aux light mounts sized to accommodate tractor lights.

with all the connections labeled and conductors color coded, repairs can be made with a pocket knife and a handful of plastic wire nuts. the objective is to be able to advance, a process made easier with a little preemptive planning.

glad you're enjoying the build, more on the way.
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Old 01-17-2014, 04:46 AM   #2429
Kiko
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Some good advice there, always plan ahead for an unexpected field repair because you just never know. I've never had my bike crap out within 100 miles of a moto shop and usually OEM parts are more than 500 miles away. Overnite delivery and an internet purchase of parts maybe in the US but not here.
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Old 01-17-2014, 07:27 AM   #2430
jdrocks OP
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Some good advice there, always plan ahead for an unexpected field repair because you just never know. I've never had my bike crap out within 100 miles of a moto shop and usually OEM parts are more than 500 miles away. Overnite delivery and an internet purchase of parts maybe in the US but not here.
can't carry a spare bike in the panniers, but there's plenty that can be done. we're all dealing with the probability of what events will occur, not events that can occur.

a lot of survivability can be built into a gravel runner, and being able to design assemblies where steel is substituted for OEM plastic is a big help. the 649 ptwin cop is never going to be the weak link, better bring the rest of the moto up to that standard as much as possible. ride...no trailer, no rollback, and help a long ways off.

i'm sure it's not a revelation to moto travelers, but dealers do not stock parts for your bike...ok, ok, they might have a light bulb, maybe an oil filter, got the ball hat.
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