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Old 08-02-2013, 07:37 PM   #1
Dr.Science OP
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Weird sticky brake problem and serious oil filter problems

The Brake Problem

Was near the end of a long tour (4K miles) the other day and the brakes on my 2009 F650GS locked up.

Now I know that sticky brakes can usually be traced to sticky cylinders, but in this case both the front and rear brakes clamped on at the same time. That isn't likely a coincidence. Also this was the first time such a thing has happened in 26K miles of riding this bike, in all types of weather and terrain.

When I figured out the problem (cruising down the highway, it initially felt like a loss of power), I pulled over to let the brakes cool and pushed the cylinders in by hand. The problem went away for 500 miles but now it's back, twice in one day. Has anyone seen this before or knows what's causing it? I'm planning to pull the calipers this weekend and make sure everything is clean and moves smoothly, but I just did that for the front brakes a couple of weeks ago and I doubt I'll find the problem that way.

The Oil Filter Problem

I guess it's not news that BMW screwed up big time when they decided to stick an unprotected oil filter on the front of the F800 engine. My ride is fitted with the BMW/Touratech skid plate to protect that filter, and I have never been too impressed with this plate. In the last 10 days TWICE rocks have gotten stuck between the filter and the skid plate, resulting in holes in the filter and associated massive, rapid loss of oil.

Basically what happens is, the front wheel throws up rocks, the rocks drop into the skid plate (which is shaped sort of like a big salad bowl) and get wedged between the filter and the skid plate. On bumps, the skid plate flexes, and drives the rock into the filter. Voila, a gusher.

Now here's the tech tip: assuming you don't go for the obvious fix (sell the bike), you will find that various different filters fit. Some have less clearance behind the skid plate than others. The greater the clearance, the larger the rock that is needed to cause a failure. One filter with big clearance is the Wix; the Fram, Mobil1 and Bosch, on the other hand, have small clearance.

Anyway I would appreciate suggestions on other ways to get around carrying a spare filter and 3 quarts of oil every time I want to ride on a gravel road.
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Old 08-02-2013, 07:53 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Science View Post
Anyway I would appreciate suggestions on other ways to get around carrying a spare filter and 3 quarts of oil every time I want to ride on a gravel road.
How about trying a different skidplate, maybe Altrider? And/or installing a longer front fender so that the rocks can't get kicked up this high?
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Old 08-02-2013, 08:17 PM   #3
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Use a piece of foam attached to the skid plate to keep rocks from collecting in there. Many dirt bikes use it, just google skid plate foam.
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Old 08-02-2013, 08:27 PM   #4
poppy510
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Hmm. Twice I have grabbed the front brake on my 09 F650 GS and the lever felt "crunchy". I assumed it was a sticky or dirty piston. Now I'm more motivated to take it apart, clean and change fluid.
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Old 08-02-2013, 09:01 PM   #5
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I don't like the idea of foam under the skid plate, it blocks too much air. and that thing next to the oil filter is an oil cooler.

How about taking one of those foam can isolators, cut it shorter so it is as tall as the oil filter.
Slide it on the filter, then put the skid plate back on. This wouldn't stop a rock from going through, but it might stop the rock from collecting in the area where it can the damage.
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Old 08-03-2013, 01:06 AM   #6
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Yeah, thought about gluing a piece of foam to the skid plate so as to exclude rocks from wedging between the plate and the filter. That would protect the filter without obstructing the airflow appreciably. Skid plate foam looks like the right type of material to use.
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Old 08-03-2013, 01:12 AM   #7
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I've taken an F800 over "a bit" of gravel road.
Not collecting, nor storing rocks on the skidplate.
Maybe you need to take that extra metal bit OFF your bike ?
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Old 08-03-2013, 05:31 PM   #8
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I've got 52K miles on my mine. I ride it year round, if there is no ice. I will say I've had issues with the slider pins on the front caliper rusting/seizing. I now just take them apart, 3M scotchbrite pad the rust off and re-grease them annually. I also service the rear caliper but it always seems to be in better condition.

I suspect it's not entirely the water XCings that is doing it, but maybe more road spray is worse on the front?
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Old 08-03-2013, 10:27 PM   #9
Girthy Knobkers
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Clean your entire brake system yearly and get a motech or alt rider skid plate.
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:31 PM   #10
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oil filter problem

I had the same problem with the Ricochet skid plate. A front fender extender fixed it.

As for the brakes, make sure the pistons can fully retract. Sounds to me like they are getting jammed up, causing the brakes to drag and the fluid heat up, causing the brakes to drag harder and the fluid heat up more....
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Old 08-06-2013, 05:19 PM   #11
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Well, the weekend investigation revealed that the rear brake piston does not retract, period. Also everything was clean and smooth, consistent with having done a rear brake service this spring. The failure of the piston to retract indicates a blockage in the return passage for the rear master cylinder, so I'm taking it to the dealer tomorrow, just to be sure the ABS system adjustment is strictly kosher. As for the front brakes... well the problem hasn't repeated itself, yet.
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Old 08-10-2013, 03:04 PM   #12
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Has the lever height been adjusted/ any damage to the pushrod? If the m/c piston can't retract far enough the recuperation port won't be uncovered...
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Old 08-10-2013, 03:53 PM   #13
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Just curious , How do you guys check whether the rear brake piston is retract or not? Cos mine rear brake is wearing faster then the front. I'm a more front brake user.
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Old 08-11-2013, 03:07 AM   #14
dpm
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push the caliper in towards the wheel a bit. It should slowly sink in (piston retracting) and then be free to slide in and out on the guide pins.

Don't forget to pump the pedal before you ride off to seat things back up again...
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:22 AM   #15
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Eh? Hard to believe

What!! Touratech doesn't make a slip-on aluminum condom for our oil filters?

Who's got the Wix filter part # handy? Thanks.
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