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Old 04-16-2015, 03:38 PM   #1
GSequoia OP
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Freshening up a DR350

Figure I should post up this thread here, too so I can link it up easier. This is a project that I picked up to get back on two wheels.

I just bought a 1990 DR350S for $600 from a buddy of mine. I'd been thinking of getting a smaller/lighter bike for more offroad fun and the recent fatal damage of the KLR sealed the deal. This is what I'll be riding to the DVNR this year.

As you would expect for such a low price the bike has a few things to take care of. The most pressing are a pretty big oil leak caused by a stripped out head cover bolt, neglect from sitting for awhile, removing the lowering link, and a blown rear shock. In addition to the above I'll be doing some more cleanup and minor mods to make the bike more to my style. I'll try to remember to update this thread as I move along.


Not too bad looking. Existing farkles include a larger gas tank (not sure if it's a 3.5 or 4.2) and IMS pegs.


I've already got new turn signals and a tail lamp on order.


349cc of air-cooled power.


7k on the clock, clearly a lot of those in the dirt.


I'm not sure about this gripper seat, anybody have any input?

That's it for now. Hopefully this bike will serve me well.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:38 PM   #2
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Time to start tearing into the engine. One of the bolt holes for the cylinder head cover was stripped out by the previous owner. This hole is in a spot that is under positive oil pressure so it generates a sizeable leak. In order to fix it I decided to completely remove the head so that I could get an easy out in squarely and eliminate the chance of aluminum shavings being unfriendly to my engine.

As with most fun evenings you have to start by getting naked.


I dig these valve adjustment windows on the head cover. For day-to-day valve maintenance there is no need to pull the whole cover.


Cover off. I was forced to remove the generator cover as well because the crank bolt plug stripped out. The previous owner must have through you needed a lot more torque than necessary. I will have to carefully cut that out and get a replacement plug.


And beheaded. I also removed the clutch cover to inspect the clutch. While I'm in there I will remove the entire basket to check the shift drum bolt, I've read that they like to back out.


That's it for tonight. I need to order some parts and gaskets and get it back together, then it's on to carburetor cleanout and gasket refresher time.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:39 PM   #3
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A bit of time spent in the garage tonight on busy work.

I started out by cleaning off most of the carbon from the cylinder head and piston. A friend of mine suggested using CLP (gun oil), that worked great even for a lazy bastard like me. After that I removed the clutch to check it out then cleaned the clutch cover mating surfaces.

Top of head is ready to start work on the stripped out bolt hole, I just need to find my M6x1 heli coil kit (I know exactly where it is... Almost).


Cylinder head cleaner than I started. No cracks I could see.


Engine ready for reassembly pending parts.


As I mentioned before I've been thinking a lot about the dashboard area. I decided to mount my Trail Tech voyager directly to the handlebars, this left me with a large void under the faring. Ultimately I decided to order a rollchart holder to go in this place. Right now I'm stalled waiting on some rough measurements of it then I'll be ready to proceed.

Only the finest CAD for my budget.


That dash should hold my ignition switch, a Carling rocker switch for my LED spot lamps, the rollchart holder, and the turn, neutral, and high beam indicators. I assure you that when I get to the wiring phase I'll completely geek out with photos and descriptions.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:40 PM   #4
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Not a whole lot to report now. I spent a little bit of time on it last night laying out the plans for the dashboard.




That's the general idea. Some final placement may move around a bit pending how it works out when I have the rollchart holder in my hands. I also have an illumination idea to flesh out once it arrives.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:40 PM   #5
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So as you may recall I just bought my DR350S only to immediately tear it down. A previous owner stripped one of the four bolts on the cylinder head cover over the camshaft. These bores are under positive oil pressure so it will produce a sizable oil leak.

After removing the cylinder head last week this evening I found my M6x1 Heli Coil set and repaired the damaged threads.

Heli Coils are a good way to repair threads. You drill the bore out to a larger size (in this case 1/4"), tap the hole, then thread the insert into place.

Heli Coils aren't very good for through holes, they have a tendency to get hung up on the bolt and be pushed out. Because of this when I drilled the hole I stopped short of going all the way through. I sized the proper distance by putting the cylinder head cover back on, removing the washer, and dropping a bolt in place. I stopped when the bolt was flush on the cover. That will give me a small bit of extra room on the final product because of the sealant and bolt gasket/washer.



If you're not familiar with threading bores you don't just run the tap in the hole in one shot. You move it in small increments, with steel I typically go a quarter turn then back off, run it back to where I was cutting and go an additional quarter turn before backing off again. This cleans the metal shavings out from the cutting heads on the tap and deposits them into the flutes. With aluminum I'm a bit more careful and only go about 1/8 of a turn before backing off.

This is why I removed the cylinder head before doing this job. I was not confident I could control all the shavings if I didn't remove the head. Plus, as an unknown motorcycle this gave me a good chance to look at the engine in detail.



The Heli Coil itself looks like a small spring with a tang on one end.



The tang engages in the driver tool. There are a few different brands that have different types of tools.



Using the tool you simply screw the coil into the newly enlarged and re-threaded bore.



On point to remember. After you have the coil completely seated in the bore take a small punch and punch the tang out. Be careful to keep track of this piece as it could cause havoc inside.



All done. Now I just have to wait for the gaskets, etc. to arrive and I can put the engine back together and maybe actually ride my "new" motorcycle!

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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:41 PM   #6
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My DR had the commonly over tightened crankshaft nut cover issue. Mine was bad enough that I couldn't get the plug to move at all before the hex head completely stripped out.



I knew I would have to cut this out. Since my new parts came in today I decided now was the time.

I started by thoroughly cleaning all the oil off the inside of the magneto cover and then covering the coils with masking tape. This was to keep the bulk of the conductive aluminum dust off of the windings.



A standard Dremel heavy duty cutoff wheel (non-reinforced) fits this job perfectly. Using this I cut away at the wall of the plug.



I did not cut through all of the wall because I did not want to damage the case. I cut through about half of the wall thickness then flipped it over and drove punch through from the inside. This cleanly knocked the face of the plug out.

As I suspected once I got the face off the inner threaded part simply unscrewed with my finger.



One last important point. Once you're done you need to very thoroughly clean the case. Get rid of all of the aluminum dust.

Now you can put it back together and put a new plug in. Don't over-tighten it, please.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:41 PM   #7
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I got home from a day in my San Diego office a little earlier than expected so I got some DR time in.

This small pile represents about $250 :( I marked all the little bags to make identification easier.


Prepping the cylinder head cover for installation.


Heat buttoned up. Ignore the bolt sticking out, that's the decompression shaft, I need to make sure I set that correctly so left the bolt up as a flag.


While I was working on the head I used a pie tin to soak the clutch friction plates. I've got my wife trained enough that she doesn't even question why I bought pie tins to work on the motorcycle.


Using the EBC clutch tools makes tightening it up nice and easy.


Mmmmm, gooey.


All buttoned up, no broken bolts this time! Hopefully we're tight enough.


Now for the cover on and done for the night.



I'm hoping that I can get out of work early enough tomorrow to at least wash the exhaust, if not get it painted. I need to bake it on Sunday and install. While it's baking I'll put the carburetor on, adjust the valves, and do some main wiring harness cleanup items (I'm a bit anal about wiring).

Too bad I can't work on it Saturday, we have to go to California Adventure because my daughter turned four yesterday. How inconsiderate of her!
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:44 PM   #8
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Boy I haven't been doing a very good job at keeping this thread updated.

On Sunday I finished buttoning up the engine so I could maybe ride this "new" bike.

Since I tend to buy my oil by the gallon I needed an easy way to measure how much oil was going into the bike so I could have a nice baseline with this new unfamiliar machine. Off to Amazon I went. When the package arrived Holly asked if I was going Walter White on her...



While I had it in the garage I figured I would tackle two of the issues I had with the bike. First the bike had lowering links (-1.5"), at six feet tall I really don't need those so I went off to eBay and got a set of OEM links. I also found that the original street model shock was blown out, badly enough that I could hear oil squishing when compressing the suspension with my own weight. I found a DR350 dirt model shock on eBay for a good price and snagged it up, this gave me rebound damping adjustment.

Low-ride-er rides a little slower.


Next on the agenda was to clean up the main harness. As with many bikes a common modification on the DR is to remove the sidestand safety switch. Whoever did it used this dubious patch to do the job (note, I had already unwrapped the factory tape from the loom here).


Since I like my electric stuff to work I trimmed the entire sidestand switch dogleg out of the loom then soldered the two wires together, covering them in sealing heat shrink tubing.


Last I wrapped the entire loom in dry vinyl tape (no messy glue). When I wrapped it I added in two 12 gauge wires for the auxiliary lights I'll put on later.


I put the loom back in the bike, put the tank back on and other critical items and though I'd go for a nice ride...
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:44 PM   #9
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
Oddometer: 1,399
Things don't always go as planned.

It was a bit late on Sunday when I finished up so I saved the ride for Monday after work. I left work, picked Sebastian up, then rushed home to play with my motorcycle. I pulled it out of the garage and started kicking...

Nothing :(

I kicked some more. I got tired. Damnit.

I checked over everything, all looks well, I double checked. Ultimately, well after dark, I decided to take the risky move. I pushed it down the street to the hill. Rolled it down and tried to bump start it. Tried three times on the litlte hill, on the third time it lit but the engine raced real bad. As I was fumbling for the enricher knob I stalled it.

Damnit.

Up the hill I go. Down I go, no luck. Up/down/up/down, hey! It hits again! This time I get a good 200' down the road before I fumble and stall it, again the engine is racing. So I push it some more but never get it started again. At about 12:30, after about a dozen times pushing it up the hill I give up and push it home.

On Tuesday I try again. This time I get it to fire on the second time down the hill and run it for a good 1000', engine racing the whole way (moderating speed with feathering clutch and brake). I stall it out then walk it home and pull the carb. I realized it was racing due to me setting the throttle screw wrong, oops. But while I have it apart I notice a few little things wrong in the carb such as some grit causing the accelerator pump to stick so no harm in pulling it.

I put the carb back on and walk the bike down the street to the hill. Push it down, jump on, and bump it. Now I've done this quite a few times, I have a system for the DR350. The bike is so light that popping the clutch in 2nd just causes the rear wheel to lock up. To mitigate that I hold both the clutch and decompression levers in. When I jump on the bike I release the clutch and let the engine spin with no compression, then I release the decompression lever. Letting the engine start moving before giving it full compression does the trick and, provided I have enough speed, starts it every time. I do need a hill to do this though because I can't quite run fast enough on flat ground and hop on before I lose all my speed.

Anyway, it starts and idles at a reasonable speed. Victory! I let it warm up for a few seconds then reach down and hit the throttle screw to keep the risk of stalling it down, now I'm going to ride it! I haven't ridden a motorcycle in nine months!

Pull the clutch, push the shifter down. HIts the skid. Damnit. Oh well, fuck first. Go up into second and take off. Try to shift to third. It isn't there. Run around in second a bit then ride home to adjust hte shifter.

Take it back out. Still no first, but sometimes I can find third. Damnit. Oh well, I ride it around about a mile anyway just to get it going (and as an excuse to ride). Then I pull it in and set it in my side yard for the night.

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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:45 PM   #10
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Wednesday after work I figure I'll work on it a bit. I can't do any real heavy lifting though since I was watching the kids by myself. I sneak out and bump start the bike then rush back home to make sure hte kids are still alive, they lived so I'm not the worst father ever.

I let it idle a bit and grab a can of starter fluid to look for vacuum leaks. I figure there are two reasons I can't start it. 1: I suck at kick starting. 2: There are air/fuel mixture issues. Since I can't easily fix how much I suck I go in after number two. Sure enough with a quick spray of starting fluid I find that my intake tube between the carburetor and head is leaking so that will be changing soon. I also notice that the header is glowing ever so lightly red, this indicates a lean air/fuel mixture which is understandable given the vacuum leak. I shut down the bike, let it cool off, then park it for the night.

Now it's tonight.

Time to take a look into my shifting problem.

I pull the bike into the garage and drain the oil. Then I remove the RH engine cover and, yet again, remove the clutch. A common issue with the DR350 is the shift drum bolt working loose. This happens a lot and causing shifting issues. Since I was aware of this I replaced this bolt on my last go-around and used red locktite to hold it in place.

Red locktite works. It works well. Sometimes frustratingly well. Luckily it's only good up to about 500 degrees. Hello Mr. Propane.




An interesting thing to note is that the shifter gears are not properly aligned. I was pretty careful when I was working on it but something must have slipped on assembly. This was likely most of my problem.

So I messed around with the bike for awhile. I removed the external shift parts then rotated the shift drum by hand and was able to easily hit every gear. I didn't feel any grittiness or a difference in resistance from one gear to another so I think I'm okay on shift forks. I decided to put it back together and test running it through the gears.

Then the shift drum bolt broke about 5 lbs shy of spec torque. :(


This is the second bolt to break on the DR. This little bike is punishing me. However like the first one this proved remarkably easy to remove. I simply cut a slot in and ran it out with a screwdriver.


So for now it sits apart. I need a new shift drum bolt. While I'm at it I'm going to get new shift drum prawls, pins, and springs as well as new detent arm. I'm thinking that will help me get the bike shifting better. I really hope I can find the parts locally tomorrow as I'm sick of waiting for parts, I'd like to commute with the bike next week so I can break it in some before the event.





If anybody actually read this random block of text congratulations, you must have been very bored.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:46 PM   #11
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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So last night (Thursday) I worked late on some server stuff. I might have scheduled this with the main goal of "working remotely" on Friday so I could sneak some DR work in. :twisted: IT life is tough.


The first task of the day was to order parts for the shifting issue. I went down to Del Amo Motorsports to order them, I should have the parts next week. Unfortunately Ersin was not at that site today so I was unable to give him shit about not attending DVNR (man his priorities are all out of whack).

When I got home I started in on completing a pet project that I've been working out for some time.

One thing I never liked about this bikes was the rear fender. The OEM taillight leaves several large holes, on top of that the aftermarket light it had left even more.



Now me being a KLR owner I like a nice, clean, pretty bike. I had to fix this. Since this machine has been nickle and diming me the idea of an aftermarket fender was nixed due to time and budget. I decided to make a panel to cover the holes and serve as a tail light and license plate bracket.

I started out with some CAD work to lay out the design.



Many thanks to the Lego Corporation for providing me with the box I needed.

After laying out the design on the cardboard I cut it out and applied it to some thin aluminum sheet.



I then cut the sheet out, drilled the holes, and roughly shaped it to the fender. Now it was ready to scuff up, prime, and paint.





Then it was as simple and attaching it to the bike. Now the rear end looks much better. The look was complete with a DRC Tail Lamp and a set of LED turn signals (only one mounted in this photo).



After that I geeked out on some wiring with my Trail Tech Voyager dash and my Trail Tech spotlamps. I will take a few photos of the wiring a bit later on, I was too busy getting OCD. For now I'll just drop this teaser shot of my new lights and my new sticker (Armstrong crest).



I think I'm going to like those lights

Tomorrow some more wiring and maybe a bit of work on the tow pig. The last time I was doing Adopt-A-Trail work I managed to mess up the exhaust. Holly doesn't want me stealing her little Jeep for DVNR so I guess I'll need to correct that.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:46 PM   #12
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
Oddometer: 1,399
A few updates today to cover the past week or so...


So the bike came with a gripper seat cover. I don't think I'm rally going to like this. I love my Seat Concepts cover on my KLR so we know where we're going.

I happened to see that Stoke from the other site had no plans to use the Seat Concepts cert. he won at last year's DVNR raffle so i tried to buy it form him. He refused. : Yes, he gave it to me, I owe him some liquid for sure.

Since I'm not 100% sure that I won't like the Gripper I decided to source another seat pan. I found a dirt model seat on eBay, these supposedly have taller foam. I don't care! The cover and foam will go right back to eBay soon.

Recovering a seat is a pretty simple job and requires basic tools. Aside from whatever you need to remove your seat from your bike you'll need a standard screwdriver, a pair of needlenose pliers, a stapler (preferably a power/pneumatic one), a utility knife, and some glue (I used 3M headliner adhesive).

The first thing to do is remove the new cover from the packaging and lay it out in the sun on a nice, warm day. I do this for at least an hour, this will make the fabric nice and pliable. Living in Southern California this is easy, if you're elsewhere another option is to stick it on in the windshield of a parked car to let the greenhouse effect work in your favor.


Start by removing your seat and taking off any brackets that are on it (in this photo you can see the metal brackets on this seat, this was just before I removed them).


Next take a screwdriver and pry the staples up. You aren't completely removing them, just giving yourself some room for the next step.


Now come back to each staple with your needlenose pliers and make them gone.


Once you have all of the staples removed you can take your original cover and foam off. Your foam may be glued to the seat so you might have to fight it some. It's okay to curse at your seat.


Take a look over the pan and make sure everything is in place. In the case of this DR350 the side panels snap into rubber grommets on the seat pan, at some point both of these grommets had slipped out of position so I had to re-seat them.


Now you need to clean as much junk off of your seat pan as you can and apply the glue. I liberally spray the adhesive to both the pan and foam, let it sit about thirty seconds, then put them together. Be careful, this stuff holds down pretty well.


Now you have the foam and pan joined together and ready to go. I'm using an old manual stapler and staples (these are probably older than Slugdad!). I also opted to use the provided plastic in between the foam and seat cover, this is optional.


Pull the cover over the seat and line it up square, paying particular attention to seams to make sure they're in the same place on both sides of the seat. Now flip the cover over and put four or six temporary staples in. You want to staple these further out than the original staples since these are only temporary.


Once you've done that and confirmed all looks good start putting the permanent staples in. I work in small zones about 6" long taking care to pull the fabric taunt and frequently flip the seat over to check for wrinkles. I move zones around the seat so I am evenly tightening to the cover. If you try to start at one end and staple to the other you will create wrinkles.

After you've gone around the whole seat remove your temporary staples and trim the excess fabric off.


Use lots of staples in the more complex corners. You will see bunching and folding on the underside but if you pull it right you won't see it on the top or sides.


Now we have a brand new seat on the right. My ass will be happy.


One more note. Sometimes you will find small wrinkles show up in the seat cover. I would advise you not to stress out about these too much as they tend to smooth out after a few days. If they don't smooth out you can always selectively remove staples and re-tighten the cover.
__________________
2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:47 PM   #13
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Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Oddometer: 1,399
Earlier I had mentioned my custom dash. I even posted a mock up photo:


Now that particular idea didn't pan out, exactly, but this did.

So a few basics, I don't have a lot of photos because I'm an idiot.

So the above template is made out of cardboard (Trader Joes Yogurt Os cereal, specifically). The real final product is made out of 16g sheet steel. I cut it out with a jigsaw, bent it in my trusty old bench vise, drilled the holes with my drill press, cut the switch hole with my Dremel, then painted it in black primer.

This is a version 1 dash, I think one day I'll completely re-do it as I don't like some of the details on this one.

Now that I had the dash panel itself made it was time to get to the wiring part. I find wiring to be very easy work so this was not in any way daunting to me. My goal was to have a path of retreat, at any time I can remove this dash and go back to the factory gauges. To accomplish this I used factory-style connectors sourced through http://www.cycleterminal.com, I was very impressed with their inventory and delivery speed.

Here I am crimping a bullet connector onto a factory wire. They carry the OEM-style bullet connectors as well as the multi-wire connectors.


Here is the back side of the panel. It is difficult to see but all wires lead to a black six-way connector that connects to the factory dash loom. The bullet connector you see is for the high-beam indicator (Suzuki left that out of the loom).


As part of my overall project I converted to LED turn signals. This not only creates the need to go to a no-load flasher module but also requires changes to the turn signal indicator wiring. On most bikes with a single turn indicator and factory incandescent bulbs actually feed both turn signal + wires to the indicator lamp. When your signals are off the ground passes through the signals and acts as the ground path for the signal. Once you put LEDs in this no longer works.

To fix this you need to insert diodes on each of those original turn signal wires and provide a new ground. In that hardness you will see two red wires that lead to a blue wire, this is my diode lead. I purchased this for $9 from MrPulldown over on ADVrider.

The other two points to note in that photo are is the relay riveted to the dash, this controls my spot lamps. The large switch is also for my spot lamps, it is a single pole-double throw switch (on-off-on). The top position is auto, in this position the spot lamps are tied to the high beam, a flick of the high beam switch goes to low and cuts the spots out. The second position is manual on, this will allow the spots to blind people whether the bike is on or off.

To feed these lamps, the relay control, and my Trail Tech voyager I ran a new 14g positive and negative wire from the battery. This wire has a 15A inline fuse, while this is actually over-rated for my current needs it is the same rating as the factory main fuse providing me with some spare parts commonality.


The wires end behind the headlamp in a new GM Weathertite connector. These are good for high-current and seal quite well.


And here is the dashboard and Voyager complete and operational.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:47 PM   #14
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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So as I mentioned before I put the bike all back together and found major shifting issues. I was also unable to kick start it and found several vacuum leaks. Well, I fixed some of that.

I took the clutch cover and clutch out of the bike and took a hard look at the external shift mechanism. My biggest fear was a shift fork issue, if I ended up having to split the cases I don't think I would have a chance in hell of the bike making it to the DVNR this year.

As mentioned earlier when I got everything apart and removed all the shifter parts I found I was able to easily move the shift drum through all six gears plus neutral. Man I was relieved. I went down to Del Amo Motorsports and ordered new shift pawls, springs, a bolt to replace the one I broke, and a shift cam stopper (mine felt a bit gritty). Those parts arrived on Wednesday. I ended up having to stay home from work to watch a slightly ill Sebastian on Wednesday so down we both went to the motorcycle store at about 5:00 PM.

I went straight to the parts counter and got my parts, then we browsed a bit on the way out.

Sebastian immediately got interested in the expensive aisle.


Me, being a cheapskate, tried to get him interested in the cheaper aisle.


Yeah, he wants a bike. I told him that he needs to be good, grades, etc. and work on his bicycle skills. Meanwhile I need to check out used little bikes. 8-)

So I get home and we eat dinner, etc. After I've got the kids to bed I can sneak out to the garage. I cleaned everything up and got the new parts in, it was feeling pretty good when everything was opened up but hard to say. I got it all buttoned up but can't test drive until Thursday due to a missing carb. gasket. Damnit.

Thursday Sebastian was still ill so I as able to get more work in on the DR (all while "working remotely" :lol:). My new gaskets came in about 2:00 PM, I set right to work! I corrected the intake leak with some RTV on the boot between the head and carb. While I was working on it I decided to replace the carb. top gasket, that's what I was waiting on, I was hoping these would improve starting to the point I could kick it over.

I put it all together carefully then put my new chain on. Now it was time to ride it to the gas station to see how big a tank I have. I measured out 1/2 gallon of fuel, poured it in, then tried to kick the bike over.

Nothing.

Screw it. I told Sebastian I'll be back in a few, pushed it down the street to the hill, and bumpstarted it. Then I turned around, topped it off, and rode home.

It shifted great!

I let it cool down, took a few photos, and put it away since I had to go to dinner at my mother in law's house this evening.



Gotta represent:


__________________
2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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Old 04-16-2015, 03:48 PM   #15
GSequoia OP
Where are my tools?
 
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Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Oddometer: 1,399
We got back from dinner around 9:15. I got the kids off to bed and put my motorcycle gear on for the first time in over nine months.

Man it felt good to do that.

I went out and tried kicking the bike over. Yea right! Off I went to the hill, bumpstarted it, and ran.

At first my plan was around the neighborhood a few miles, take it easy, just a longer test ride.

That didn't last long. Up I went into Palos Verdes. Twisty roads, etc. etc.

Along the way I decided to find a nice dark spot (road to Point Vicente lighthouse) and check my spots.



Yeah, they need to be aimed. I did that when I got home.

All in all I rode it 22 miles last night. The bike performed great! It shifted through all six gears well, a bit more firmly than my KLR but not really an issue. The little 350 has a decent amount of pep and is capable of lofting the front wheel.




Tonight I'm going to try to do my old standard midnight ride. A tour of the refinery areas of Wilmington followed by the Port of Los Angeles/Terminal Island and then the windiest rods of Palos Verdes before heading home.
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2005 KLR 650 A bit beat up but works just fine. Powered by really angry canaries. - Actually it's a bit dead right now.
1990 DR350S Smaller. Lighter. Slower.
1985 Suzuki GS700E Some assembly required
1977 Cimatti City Bike. What, you call that a build thread? Officially stalled...
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