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Old 01-28-2011, 08:27 AM   #16
erkmania
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"Erkmania, thanks for your positive comments. However, I think this thread gives off the (very) wrong impression that I'm even somehow knowledgeable with suspension..."

You deserved the commentary for your thorough dissection. And, I'm sure you know WAY more than most about suspension.

As for WP springs, I kinda figured I was grasping for info you didn't possess regarding the New World.
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Old 01-28-2011, 08:29 AM   #17
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Thanks, LukasM. That's a REAL help.
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Old 01-30-2011, 08:46 PM   #18
NSFW
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good job........
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Old 07-07-2011, 12:42 PM   #19
Tseta OP
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Ba-da-bump...

I found a way to make the vacuum bleeding easier, provided that you have access to compressed air.

The back story is that the cheap mityvac knock-off did not work very well straight from the beginning. It would not produce a very strong vacuum and pumping the handle was quite tiresome. "Official" vacuum bleeding methods employ an electric vacuum pump, but these are hard to come by or prohibitively expensive.

A light dawned: in automated parts handling and manipulation, vacuum grippers (suction cups etc.) are often used. So, there must be plenty of simple and inexpensive vacuum generators out there. Flipping through my SMC catalog, I found the following:

SMC series ZU vacuum generators

These are simple, ejector-based, inline vacuum generators. So, a pressure regulator (which I already had from the leak-down tester...), and a few fittings later, I now have a functional, compressor-powered vacuum source. The ejector itself cost maybe less than 20 euros, not too bad IMHO.


(The actual ejector is the white cylinder-looking thing inline on the assembly, between the yellowish hose and the quick-disconnect.)

I tested this setup today and it worked very well. The bleeding procedure is still the same as with the manual pump, only I don't have to fatigue my hands with pumping the vacuum over and over again. I also think I got more of the air out in a shorter amount of time.

Cheers,

Tseta
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Old 09-09-2011, 05:08 PM   #20
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tseta View Post
Thanks for all the positive comments. Maybe this thread will make it to the index..

I wish somebody will be inspired to do the shock service by themselves. Hopefully we will be hearing many success stories of shocks refreshed and money saved!

...
This is at the top of the list for sure! I really need to do some maintenance to those posts... been a LONG time.

I missed this one Tseta - not that I'm about to tackle the shock (the forks have been challenging enough, and I haven't even done the seals yet). But others may be for sure - and the index may help them find your thread.

Good job compiling links - I appreciate that most of all - more info is not a problem for me as long as its organized like this.
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Old 12-13-2011, 01:43 PM   #21
DesignerRider
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Wow! Incredible right-up on this. I am indeed feeling inspired to attempt this myself. I'm definitely a fan of saving money and learning too!

I have a question to throw out there regarding my shock if anyone should know. The bike is a 1998 620 Adventure with no service ever being done on the suspension. On the past couple rides, the rebound stroke has been feeling different and now after being compressed, it jumps back up and makes a knocking sound, like it's hitting metal at the end of its travel. Hopefully that makes sense. I just wondering what I would be looking for or replacing with that symptom.

I am debating whether to bring it to the pros or to do it myself (after having read this thread!).
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Old 12-13-2011, 04:01 PM   #22
laramie LC4
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wow! i dont even want to know how long that took to document/edit/post. bravo for the extra effort.

laramie
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Old 12-14-2011, 08:28 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesignerRider View Post
Wow! Incredible right-up on this. I am indeed feeling inspired to attempt this myself. I'm definitely a fan of saving money and learning too!

I have a question to throw out there regarding my shock if anyone should know. The bike is a 1998 620 Adventure with no service ever being done on the suspension. On the past couple rides, the rebound stroke has been feeling different and now after being compressed, it jumps back up and makes a knocking sound, like it's hitting metal at the end of its travel. Hopefully that makes sense. I just wondering what I would be looking for or replacing with that symptom.

I am debating whether to bring it to the pros or to do it myself (after having read this thread!).
Hmm... There should not really be any chance for hard metal-to-metal contact in the shock. On compression stroke, the bottoming cone takes care of that, and on rebound, the seal head adapter has a rubber bumper as well that the piston will touch.



Is the shock noticably leaking? Is the bottom of the shock dirty? Do the compression and rebound adjusters work? Specifically about the rebound adjuster, can you feel it "clicking" both ways?

Tough to really say what's wrong with the shock without knowing more. However, there are only a handful of seals, piston rings and such that can really wear out (detailed in the original post), so changing those should solve the problem, without breaking the bank. My best guess at the moment would be that you've somehow lost the pressure in the reservoir and/or a little oil as well, and now the shock is basically just blowing through the stroke in both directions. It is, for some reason, just more noticable on the rebound.

Remember, I'm no expert: I don't do this for a living nor have I ever had any training or education in servicing shocks. So, my advice is worth just as much as you paid for it, take it with a grain of salt as well...

-T
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Old 12-14-2011, 10:16 PM   #24
DesignerRider
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The shock is, indeed, a little wet at the bottom. The clunking noise is very audible and obvious at the end of the rebound. I'll have to inspect it a little more, but it definitely seems to need some loving!

Luckily I found this thread. And even if I screw something up, at least I'll be learning!
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Old 05-20-2012, 08:59 AM   #25
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Firstly, brilliant article well presented, thanks just what I was looking for.

Just a quick question,
When the shock is rebuilt without the spring or charged with air but filled with oil, should it be relatively easy to push the shock rod in and fiendishly difficult to pull out?
Just want to set my mind at rest as it will be a while before it goes back on the bike as I am waiting for the wheels to be respoked and the fork legs to be rechromed.

PS don't forget to put the spring adjusting nuts on before reassembling the shock as they don't fit over the lower spring mount...Doh

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Old 05-20-2012, 05:14 PM   #26
rz35027
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The shock should compress with pressure, and be difficult to pull back out.... With the nitrogen charged it should rebound all the way out on it's own (slowly).
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Old 05-21-2012, 08:26 AM   #27
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Thank mate, much appreciated.
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Old 02-03-2013, 03:28 PM   #28
Desert Silver
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I want to thank you very much Tseta for your very informative write up. I just finished rebuilding the shock off of my 96 406 ATK which started leaking after I let my son ride it. I just finished it up today and took it for a 4 or 5 lap run around my property. I used CO2 from a bicycle tire infiltrator to get the pressure up to 175psi which I believe is what it's suppose to be. Does anybody know if using CO2 instead of nitrogen is going to hurt my shock? I'm unemployed at this time and can't really afford to spend any money on anything but survival. Plus I want to make sure the shock is going to work ok before I spend the money for the N2 charging.
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Old 02-03-2013, 11:21 PM   #29
bmwktmbill
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Desert,
My guess is that N is more stable temperature wise than CO2.
The shock gets hot.

Some Tire shops might have N in a tank if you ask around.
bill
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Old 02-04-2013, 10:50 AM   #30
wrk2surf
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This great thread needs bumping.. Is it in the bike specific thread ??
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