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Old 03-05-2013, 08:29 AM   #31
LC Garage
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Race Report TTR 250

If you use this link to go to my regular thread and go down to the eighth entry (from the top) you will find my TTR 250 race report from the 6 hour enduro at Eddieville, Washington.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...698196&page=18
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:04 PM   #32
tdvt
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Sounds like you held your own & the TTR made it out alive. I am on a suspension kick at the moment trying to figure out where to start, so feel free to share any insights or impressions.

Looked like fun!
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:36 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by tdvt View Post
Sounds like you held your own & the TTR made it out alive. I am on a suspension kick at the moment trying to figure out where to start, so feel free to share any insights or impressions.

Looked like fun!
I am definitely struggling with the question of how far to take the little TTR, where is the line when you look for a purpose built machine and stop putting money in? As a trail or even true enduro bike (this race was just a giant hi speed mx track, not really an enduro) the TTR really shines. As I rode the other day, was trying to objectively sort out the pros and cons and here are the pros; excellent transmission and brakes, love the electric start, very comfortable. The cons; suspension, weight and horsepower. I would have to give the steering dampener a big thumbs up, just because my arms were not fatigued nearly as much as I suspected they would be and also the sense of confidence when riding through the rocks.

Suspension can be fixed, whether you go with a set of YZ forks or maybe just the gold valves & springs and have rear shock built and sprung, horsepower can be massaged a little, not much to be done about weight. We are going to practice this Sunday and I will be trying out my buddies KTM 300 and may end up riding that a the St Patty's day event.

Haven't given up on the TTR yet, just trying to be realistic about its intended use will it be up to the task. It is also part of the equation to figure out if I am just getting slower and more cautious, but riding the KTM 300 should give a bit of a measuring stick for that concern as well.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:59 PM   #34
sanjoh
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Better get the checkbook ready You will want er need a KTM 300 after the first 5 minutes on it
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:29 PM   #35
tdvt
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Originally Posted by LC Garage View Post
I am definitely struggling with the question of how far to take the little TTR, where is the line when you look for a purpose built machine and stop putting money in?
That about sums it up for me as well.

But I'm not there yet as I can't really justify the expense of another bike & I'm too stupid to stop tinkering.
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:53 PM   #36
tdvt
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LC, You might enjoy this video if you haven't seen it & check out the front end of the bike.

VIDEO

Turns out Geoff Ballard (Big time Aussie racer, ISDE medalist, etc.) runs TTR forks on his WR & it seems others on his race team use them from time to time as well. Found it during all my Google-ing TTR suspension, also posted it on TTR site.

Love to know what the mods are.
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:16 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdvt View Post
LC, You might enjoy this video if you haven't seen it & check out the front end of the bike.

VIDEO

Turns out Geoff Ballard (Big time Aussie racer, ISDE medalist, etc.) runs TTR forks on his WR & it seems others on his race team use them from time to time as well. Found it during all my Google-ing TTR suspension, also posted it on TTR site.

Love to know what the mods are.
great video, he hauls A$$ on that bike!

never thought I'd see a world class competitor (nowadays) with old school forks, but there they are!

thanks for sharing this info, definitely food for thought...
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:25 AM   #38
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Numbers

Recently joined the OMRA and received my number, it is the same as before but with different colors and letter designation (old T98, new is 98Y). Have been working like mad on the motor home, helping with Luke's MK1 bike and assorted other stuff, so needed a break to do something fun. Putting on new numbers would be fun and still be forward progress. BTW; TTR vs. something new, enjoyed riding the KTM 300MX as well as the CR450X, but the TTR is my bike and I'm not wanting to buy or borrow right now, so am going to forge ahead and ride and race this bike until I can make up my mind on the ideal bike(s).

Before, with old numbers and the add ons from the cross country team race;


After using heat gun to peel off all the old stuff, (the heat gun worked really well!);


Bought a kit with yellow backgrounds you cut to shape, installed those and then mocked up the numbers/letters;


Completed;


Now she's up on the stand waiting for fork oil change and reinstall of old handguards. The old brushbusters were on the handlebars when I crashed last year and dont fit the new bars and I'm just too lazy to modify them right now. Only 9 days until the Desert 100.
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:59 AM   #39
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Fork Oil

After reading quite a few interweb posts on TTR250 handling and what fork oil, what height, what method, blah blah blah, decided to get the fork oil changed and see for myself what kind of effect it might have on the handling.

First, removed the front wheel and dropped the left fork leg. Dropped it down where I could reach the upper cap and loosen before removing leg;


First leg was critical as this was going to be my learning curve and no manual. Luckily Luke was nearby to offer a few tips and pointers. Put the leg in the vise (with wood blocks to protect) and dismantled upper cap from dampner rod, spacers and spring;


Then I carefully tipped it into a clean coffee can, so I could capture all the old fork oil and measure;


Approximately 425 cc's of fluid;


The plan was to put approx same amount of fluid in as came out and measure oil height, then go from there. Various accounts on the always reliable internet stated oil heights, depending on application and desired results, should be from 130 mm to 150 mm.

Highly technical measuring device ready for action, made marks at 130, 140, 150 and 160 mm;


Decided to start with 450 cc of Honda 10 wt fork oil;


After carefully pouring in the oil and then moving the dampner through multiple cycles to clear air bubbles, measured the height. It came in at 165 mm. Added 50 cc's and remeasured, this time it was at 135mm. This was pretty close to what I'd read as the maximum oil height and decided to stop there. It was also a nice even number to remember for future use, 500 cc = 135 mm oil height. This may differ from bike to bike and also how much of the old oil you are able remove.

For reassembly, you will need to attach a piece of bailing wire just under the top nut on the dampner rod. Trust me, you need the wire!


Now assemble the spring and spacers, then the top cap;


Screw it all together, slip the fork gator back on (not shown, after draining the leg I found the gator was in the way and should have been removed from the start, makes it easier to handle and also to wipe down and check fork seal) and slide part way into the triple calmp, tighten the top cap and then reassemble. Repeat on right hand side. Note: I cheated on the right side, saw no reason to go through the whole measuring process and skipped the top cap and spring removal steps, just took the cap loose, allowed leg to collapse, put a stop in the spring to keep the leg from collapsing downward and stood upside down in the coffee can and let it drain for a good long while. Stood it back upright, deflected the spring to one side and very carefully poured in 500 cc of oil. Reassembled. Done.



Ride report in about two weeks.
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Old 03-30-2013, 04:43 AM   #40
tdvt
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Again, thanks for taking the time to document the process. This is something that I have thought about but have been putting off.

We still have a few weeks of thawing out left to go here but it is finally getting warm enough to do some work in the garage without being miserable.

I have not finished my WR exhaust install, the one I got was from a much newer bike & was shaped differently the the swap I'd seen. I also just received a few OEM jets to try as I've never been completely happy with the carb since I got the bike running. Is yours running the stock US sizes?

So, I've got a good list & hope to get to all this maintenance stuff before there's bare ground to ride on.

Look forward to your ride report regarding the front-end.

TD
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Old 04-10-2013, 03:22 PM   #41
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Ride/Suspension Report

Just returned from Odessa, Washington and the Desert 100. Had a great weekend, fantastic riding, great friends, everything you could hope for.

Report here; http://advrider.com/forums/showpost....&postcount=294

As reported previously, the fork oil had been changed out for Honda #10 weight fork oil, 500 cc per leg, or approx 135 mm oil height. A few shorter trail rides indicated improvement, most notably the choppiness on pit run (gravel or road bed-rock approx 4" diameter) was gone. Experimenting, I also cranked down the rear shock compression damping to within 5 clicks of full and rode some more. Me like! Then my buddy Luke rode it and said he thought the back end was kicking on rebound and should be ajusted for that. We talked it over and decided to wait until we were out in the desert and could adjust and check on the fly. We turned the rebound adjuster (at bottom of shock, just above link) in and out just to see where it was at and we were within 6 clicks of full rebound.

Got out to the desert and during Saturday's poker run, stopped at the first check and screwed the rebound in to within 2 clicks of full. Now we are getting somewhere! She is no longer kicking like a mule coming out of the whoops, much more stable and forgiving.

The next day, rode the D100 (I'm a super senior so only had to ride one 50 mile loop, but trust me, this course is very tough). She behaved very well, I'm thinking the bike is as good or close to as good as I can get until rebuilding the suspension with gold valves front and rear. We have not pulled the front fork plugs (yet) and are assuming that they are at the factory setting of 11 clicks (out of 22) and they do seem fine now after the oil change. Will pull and check these just to be sure.

Hope this helps the rest of you with your setups and by the way, the steering dampner saved me several times, most notably when coming thru a fenced/gated section in second gear, hit a hidden baby head that started to launch me into the fence post and the bike just righted itself, close but no crash. Awesome!

Here is one action shot from Sunday's race, very close to the finish line;


Happy trails!
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Old 04-17-2013, 02:55 AM   #42
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My son and his TTR.



one more

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Old 05-10-2013, 05:17 AM   #43
TerryK
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new TT-R250

As the title said, I bought a new TT-R250 last week, wanted a lighter electric start air cooled bike.
Fitted Acerbis Rally hand guards
B&B bash plate
Enduro mirrors
Staintune muffler
Moved the forks up in the triples
wound back the rear spring preload

Some photos:













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Old 05-10-2013, 05:23 AM   #44
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videos

few videos on the new TT-R

">
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