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Old 03-18-2011, 05:28 PM   #106
Foot dragger
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Location: chico,just below rag dump(nor-cal)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by East Coast Rider View Post
ATV seat pad from Wal Mart is 18.00 bucks...what is the oil change interval for the 450?

Shinko 705s are ~ $100.00 for a set including shipping from BikeBandit. They'd have plenty of life left after you're done with the trip.
The top end change interval is about 10 to 12000 miles,thats the average for a well cared for KTM single. KTM doesnt even reccomend riding em on the road,no cush hub on clutch or rear wheel,other then the skinny seat,knobby tires,40 mpg average,vibrating dirt bike sensation I cant think of a better bike for a long road ride.
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:17 PM   #107
De Eee OP
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Location: 20 miles from Santiago Pk.
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Well, here is my story. I hope it isn't too long winded. However, in order to do justice to a ride of this length a long story is justified. I want to thank everyone for their support, advice and sponsorship. A special thanks to mxchamp for sending me a nice set of Pirelli tires. No flats dude!


Tuesday night I couldn’t sleep. The day of the big ride was close at hand. I lay in bed running down my (mental) prep list and realized there were a few nagging things left to do. I had forgotten to charge batteries in the camera, phone and emergency “headlight” (a Light and Motion 200 lumen bike light that I had zip tied to the fork leg). It was past midnight and I knew I would never sleep unless I took care of these things. I jumped out of bed and plugged them all in. I needed some sleep before getting up at 5 for work.

Wednesday night I figured I would be too wound up to sleep. With a 3am departure time planned I only had around 4 hrs to sleep but it worked out ok. I went to sleep at 8pm and slept soundly till 2am. The alarm went off and I was instantly up and putting on riding clothes, man was I psyched! Toast and tea and I’m ready to roll the bike out. Oops, forgot to tape the foam on my seat, better do that. I recall Steve losing his wallet and I put all my cash in my chest pocket. I see Marge is up and ready to wake our boy Jake and go to the Shell station to witness the start. Off we go down to the station and it’s gas up, log entry, hugs and see you later. The receipt says 2:59am.

I get on the 5 north for one exit to the 55 north and then merge on the 91 east. After about 15 miles I realize it’s cold out (for So Cal) and my head and hands are as well. I don’t want to stop right away but decide I’ll get off at Green River to change gloves and put on a balaclava. That will be convenient, easy off, easy on. I get off and realize the on ramp is closed! Dang, what a way to start, I take the frontage road and after a mile it turns away from the freeway, aargh! After a couple miles I hit Serfas Club Rd. and head back to the freeway and relief. I stop and change gloves, don the clava and I am really off.

I get on the 15 north and over Cajon Pass to Victorville where the 395 goes north at the Outpost Café, my first gas stop. I am getting around 50 mpg. Gas and go north to Kramer Junction for my second gas stop. I put on my big jacket and am now wearing every stitch I have, it is still cold. Not shivering cold but just very uncomfortable. From here I want to be able to make it to Lone Pine via a side trip through the Panamint Valley. I wasn’t sure if there would be gas available in Trona at 5ish. Leaving 395 at Red Mtn., I head northeast eventually passing the bright industrial lighting of Trona and note that two stations are open; I didn’t even know there was gas there. A few miles later the darkness is complete except for my little headlight world. A rabbit runs out and I get a shot of adrenaline.

There is nobody out here but me. The drop into Panamint is cool, very steep and twisty, I have to slow down a bit. The tires grip like mad and I have to lean it hard into a couple surprise corners. The sun starts to come up as I head up the valley and I can see snow on the higher peaks nearby. A left onto the 190 and I hit Panamint Springs. A guy is getting out of his sleeping bag in a campsite right by the road. He gives me a “what the?” - look. He might be thinking “a KTM EXC with a windshield?” That’s what I would be thinking. He and his buddies have dirt bikes (I spot a DRZ and a XR) and are looking forward to a day on dirt. My second photo of the ride is my bike in front of the Panamint Springs store.


The campground.




The Panamint store.



Looking back at Panamint.


The 190 west hits the 136 north near Keeler and on to Lone Pine. The cold is starting to gnaw away at my psych and I’m starting to think I might have to get more clothes or something. I’m not very happy but promise myself breakfast at the Mt. Whitney Café. I’m hungry and cold and hot food will help both conditions. I roll into Lone Pine at about 8am and it is a welcome oasis. The food here is very good and a Denver omelet and HOT green tea is the ticket. The waitress tells me yesterday it got very windy at around 2pm when I ask her if it is going to warm up. I hope to be past Tonapah by then. Feeling much better I head for the gas station. The only one left is a Mobil, which I hate (I boycott Mobil, it’s a long story). I decide to push on. I have four 1000ml bottles of gas with me so I’m not worried. Maybe I can make it to Bishop. The view of the High Sierra is awesome; there is aton of snow.


From north of Keeler looking towards Lone Pine.

Halfway between Independence and Big Pine the bike dies. I am coasting and switch to reserve and it still dies. I stop. What’s going on? My new Safari tank has a pocket on the right that the petcock doesn’t service. I lean the bike over and move the gas over. It starts up and I’m rolling. A couple miles later it dies again, now I’m worried. I get off and look at the petcock, hmm. All of a sudden I realize the other position is reserve. What a dummy, shoulda’ known. All is good again and I fill up in Big Pine. From there I can still make Tonapah. 300 miles down and I call Marge to check in.


On the north end of Bishop checking the oil.

On the north edge of Bishop I stop to check the oil and add a bit. I go north on the 6 through Benton, into Nevada and over Montgomery Pass. This will be my high point at 7120 ft. above sea level. There is snow along the road but the pavement is dry.




Looking east towards Montgomery Pass.


One thing about a ride like this that I particularly enjoyed is that you get a lot of time to think. Looking at all the mountains I got to relive 45 years of mountaineering, backpacking and mtn. biking. People I hadn’t thought of in years are remembered. Songs, movies, history, family, laughter, tragedy; the mind has time to wander. You are continually evaluating the trip, how far gone, how far to go, miles, gas mileage, rest and gas stops. It is a mental trip as well as a physical one.


Empty highway in Nevada.

Between Benton and Tonapah I only see a few other travelers. It feels pretty “out there.” I am reminded of some classic lines from one of my favorite westerns, “The Searchers” starring John Wayne. I love that movie. I feel like a “Texican.”
Mrs. Jorgensen ( Olive Carey ):
"It just so happens we be Texicans. Texican is nothing but a human man way out on a limb. This year and next and maybe for a hundred more. But I don't think it will be forever. Someday this country is going to be a fine, good place to be. And maybe it needs our bones in the ground before that time can come."


Welcome to Tonapah.

To the north I can see the basin and range topography Nevada is famous for. Tonapah comes and goes. I go south on the 95 and west into Death Valley on the 267. Past Scotty’s Castle and I am in the valley itself. I have lost a lot of altitude and it has gotten warmer and warmer. I stop to shed clothing and eat a 6” Subway sandwich I brought. A group of dual sports go by and the lead guy slows to ask if I am OK. I give a thumbs up and off they go.


Dual sporters head north.

Stop to shed some clothes.

Gas at Furnace Creek and I have a nice conversation with a guy about motos. He has a WR in the trailer he tells me. I get to ride the whole length of DV and it is so beautiful, the place is rad, flowers are happening; it never disappoints. A beautiful woman waves at me. These are the best miles.




Over Jubilee Pass, Salsbery Pass, through Shoshone, past the Dumont Dunes and I stop to get gas in Baker. I make my second call to Marge and leave a message, wonder where they are? I stop again at Willow Wash where the Mojave Trail crosses the Kelbaker road to eat my other Subway 6”. South… Kelso, Granite Pass, the 40, Highway 66, Amboy, towards 29 Palms for gas. Wow, there’s actually an open business in Amboy now with gas and a café next to the old landmark “Roy’s Cafe.” A very lonely man sits alone inside. I realize I only have a couple hundred miles or so left and it doesn’t seem like much. It is. It is the hardest part.


Granite Pass.

Almost sunset.

Have I forgotten to mention that my butt hurt? It started at about mile 400. Every stop is a relief, ibuprofen helps, standing helps. My legs were not very comfortable either. At 6’2” I’m a bit cramped on the EXC, good for trails, bad for the road. I’m starting to get a feeling of general fatigue although I am still alert. Motorcycle riding forces you to pay attention. I can’t get the Elton John song “I guess that’s why they call it the blues” out of my head. It’s not my favorite but there it is over and over.


Roys on Highway 66.

I enter Joshua Tree National Park in darkness and head for the south exit past Cottonwood. I had forgotten how twisty that road is, 30 miles of tight. My headlight is inadequate (my eyes are getting tired) but I eventually catch up to a sports car that is moving right along and am content to follow using his lights and cues. I need an HID light. Light is safety.

We exit the park and turn west on the 10. I stop to rest and eat again at a rest stop 15 miles from Indio. My last call to Marge and all is good at home and on the road. It’s about 8:30 when I leave.
Back to the road; it feels like the home stretch, I jump in the fast lane and pass a bunch of trucks. All of a sudden it is windy, like really windy. I’m getting blown left and right, I can’t even tell which direction the wind is blowing. We pass one of those lit road condition warning signs; it is flashing “Gusting Winds Ahead.” Oh, that’s great. I’m not happy about that. Forced to slow down I try to hang near the middle of the right lane to give me swerve room to either side. Blow left, correct right, blow right, correct left, hold on for passing trucks turbulence, 5 seconds of calm, repeat sequence. I have a death grip on the bars. Slowing to about 50 mph the trucks are all passing me back. I try to follow one truck but I can’t hang. At this point it is survival and the adrenal gland is pumping nonstop. It is totally desperate for about 60 miles till I enter the San Gorgonio Pass area. Then the topography forces the wind into only a headwind, it is strong but manageable. The windmills I can see are a blur. I realize I should have gotten gas in Indio to verify my route but forgot during the battle. I have been figuring the miles to account for the ~4% speedometer error mentioned on the IBA website. I also think I may need to add more miles just in case my Joshua Tree excursion is discredited. I decide to finish by heading over to the Ortega Highway. That would add another 30 miles or so and be a more classic way to finish. Plus I need to get off the interstate; it’s way too stressful. At this point I just want it to be over.

I take the 60 west off the 10 stopping to rest and eat one last time at the Gilman Springs exit. I lean against the road-cut for 10 minutes, eat a granola bar and feel a little better. It’s the 215 south at Moreno Valley and west on the 74 at Perris and I’m headed for Lake Elsinore. I gas up the second to last time and head to cross the Santa Ana Mts. on the infamous Ortega, home to body dumping meth freaks, car shuttling mtn. bikers, knee dragging crotch rocket maniacs and, not to mention the craziest of all, the commuters. There are a couple of Police cars pulled over in Elsinore but luckily I don’t do anything stupid and am soon heading up the hill. At the high point a car pulls over to let me pass but I wave him on. I can’t have anyone near me for awhile and cruise rather slowly the rest of the way to the 5 and north for home. I call Marge to witness my finish, get gas and then there I am at home and it is over. It seems a lifetime in 21 hours. It is 15 minutes after midnight. What an anticlimax.

Early on in the ride, at about 10 hours, I was thinking “those folks who do multiple long rides like this are effing insane.” But later on, even though the pain and fatigue were really kicking in, I began to realize what it might mean to some. The feeling of going that far, of pushing through the bad parts, of putting the butt/leg/head/hand/insert here pain out of your mind and doing something on a motorcycle that is that big is satisfying. To go that far in a day is extreme. The bottom line is: It is something to be proud of. I realized how addictive this sort of thing could be. I just now looked at some of the bigger rides on the IBA list. 100,000 miles in a year, you have got to be kidding me, how many people have done that?!

To all of you that have done these I BOW DOWN.




I took everything except the crazy little dog named Xena.


De Eee screwed with this post 03-18-2011 at 09:43 PM
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Old 03-18-2011, 10:40 PM   #108
OaklandLion
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Great stuff!

I have a 450exc, and even with slicks and a padded seat, no way could I do it.

Would love to see your route on google maps.
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Old 03-19-2011, 04:33 AM   #109
disconnected
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Ya man, thanks for sharing!!
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Old 03-19-2011, 06:49 AM   #110
mxchamp
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Thumb That!

WAS AWESOME!!!!!


You have proved that the 450 can do it!

It's a KTM was there any doubt?????
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Old 03-19-2011, 02:05 PM   #111
oregonlmd
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Great job! 250-300 mile, mostly off-pavement, days were easy for me on my 525 in SE Oregon last summer. Maybe I, too, could do a 1000 mile day by making one mostly pavement. You have been an incredible inspiration! Hope all goes well with the IBA cert!
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Old 03-19-2011, 07:06 PM   #112
413.45
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NICE JOB!!
btw what is up with cal-trans. On-ramp closed! They did that to me so
many times in the middle of the night and they never have signs telling
you how to get back to the freeway. Very annoying when your in an 18
wheeler
.

Anyway, I really enjoyed this thread, it's got me thinking about
trying it myself.
CONGRATS!!


.
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Old 03-19-2011, 08:27 PM   #113
Delta88
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Location: The Holy City of Kent, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by De Eee View Post
....One thing about a ride like this that I particularly enjoyed is that you get a lot of time to think. Looking at all the mountains I got to relive 45 years of mountaineering, backpacking and mtn. biking. People I hadn’t thought of in years are remembered. Songs, movies, history, family, laughter, tragedy; the mind has time to wander. You are continually evaluating the trip, how far gone, how far to go, miles, gas mileage, rest and gas stops. It is a mental trip as well as a physical one.
.........
Just found this thread tonight. Way to go!! Great ride and a great report. I especially liked the excerpt above. You've managed to capture, in a couple of short sentences, one of the things I love most about LD riding. You are hooked, (screwed, maybe), now. I doubt this will be your last long distance ride.

Congratulations.
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Old 03-20-2011, 08:21 AM   #114
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Way to go Dave!

DW
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Old 03-20-2011, 12:10 PM   #115
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sorry if I missed it, but what about maintenance? did you adjust valves, change oil, or other during the trip?? thanks
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Old 03-20-2011, 05:26 PM   #116
De Eee OP
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Location: 20 miles from Santiago Pk.
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Thanks you all.

Yes the KTM ran perfectly, it didn't even hiccup.

My single plastic "enduro" style mirror was totally inadequate. It doesn't really reach far enough left to see on the street, especially with the vibrations. At night it is all but useless. Only good on the dirt.

The tires were flawless, no flats. I did use my ultra heavy duty Bridgestone tubes with slime. I have yet to get a flat even offroad. Ran 8 psi on the Dusy Ershim.

Maintenance?
In the months leading up to the ride I checked all bolts I could see. I put on new radiator guards, the old ones were bent, added the new tank and plastic (xmas $), got the Spitfire windshield and tank bag (the Giant Loop bag was a splurge, super nice though, I had the Wolfman enduro saddle bags, also very nice, I'm tired of using a pack for everything), put on the Pirelli Scorpion tires that mxchamp donated and cleaned the bike cleaner than it has been since new. I even cleaned the spokes and the inside of the skid plate. I did every thing I could think of. My friends gave me shit about the new plastic.
I changed the oil, cleaned all filters, lubed the chain and topped off the coolant the day before the ride. I added a bit of oil at about 350 miles in. I was tempted to adjust the valves but after reading about the guy riding cross country without any trouble I didn't worry about it. They had about 800 miles on them before the ride. Normally I do them every 1000 miles or so.

Another pic or two.


Lone Pine Peak, Mt. Whitney and Mt. Russell



Tonopah



Beautiful woman just ahead.

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Old 03-20-2011, 05:55 PM   #117
Miles Tugeaux
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Most excellent! Congrats on the ride, and thanks for a really nice report.

MT
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Old 03-20-2011, 06:37 PM   #118
BishopRL
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Saw the link over on the LDRider list. Great ride and report. That's a long ride for a "non-LD" bike, and you even bagged some passes on the way. Made my SS1000 on a KLR650 look easy.
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Old 03-20-2011, 07:29 PM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by De Eee View Post
Early on in the ride, at about 10 hours, I was thinking “those folks who do multiple long rides like this are effing insane.” But later on, even though the pain and fatigue were really kicking in, I began to realize what it might mean to some. The feeling of going that far, of pushing through the bad parts, of putting the butt/leg/head/hand/insert here pain out of your mind and doing something on a motorcycle that is that big is satisfying. To go that far in a day is extreme. The bottom line is: It is something to be proud of. I realized how addictive this sort of thing could be. I just now looked at some of the bigger rides on the IBA list. 100,000 miles in a year, you have got to be kidding me, how many people have done that?!

To all of you that have done these I BOW DOWN.
Nice summation, Dave.
Butt I will assure you, many, many of those big dogs over at the IBA would be loathe to attempt your feat on your bike.
Ritalin Boy linked this thread to the ldr list, and dare I say, you have earned a bit of respect over there. (DISCLAIMER: I can't speak for them, but the facts is the facts... ya dun good!)
Hats off to you, and congratulations! Well done.

And on a side note, it's nice to see that the ADV community was, for the most part, highly supportive.
For those coupla naysayers, well, ....nanner, nanner, nanner, ya losers. Be ashamed.
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Old 03-20-2011, 07:38 PM   #120
twigg
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Very nice ride

For what it's worth ....

I don't think a Certificate should be allowed, unless you lose your wallet halfway round

Good Ride, Good Write-Up

Steve
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