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Old 01-31-2011, 08:09 AM   #16
Scottly
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I know it took you a lot of time to post all of this, and I think I can speak for everyone and say that it's greatly appreciated!!!!
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Old 01-31-2011, 09:26 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lineareagle View Post
I only have one issue, you say remove the positive lead on the battery first.
I believe that should be the negative lead first.

Reason, if your wrench accidentally touches a frame or ground while removing the neg lead, no problem.
If you are removing the positive first and you touch a ground you are going to short out. After the negative is removed and taped up if you touch a ground while removing the positive lead, no problem.
Congrats Mr. Eagle, that was a test (), you were the first to catch it and you are absolutely right for the reasons stated.

Thanks for the catch, I've made the necessary text correction.
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Old 01-31-2011, 06:51 PM   #18
Disco Dean
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Thumb Good work!!

Very nice - I just finished a seal replacement on mine and am almost done the rebuild. No matter what the next one will be quicker for sure.

I have some notes from mine that might help if I got yours right...

#5 - I found out the hard way that you not have to take off the rear plastic silver seat cowling or the grab rails or seat clamp at all - the bottom black plastic seat pan drops down with the removal of the 6 screws from underneath the rear subframe. Remove the 4 torx holding the plastic shroud on and the two in the relay box at the front of the shroud and it drops down to show the harness and tie-wraps...

#9 - I found the carb clamps easy to remove and also easy to clip back up with very little effort

I also saw that you removed the right side throttle/carb body completely - I didn't find a need to do that at all as the right side rubber came off simply and easily and slide on just as well - it helped me to not have to worry about both of those clamps and related crap.

One note that anyone who tries this will find out also is that the left side carb has to come off completely if for no other reason than to get to a single frame bolt hidden behind it - bugger that is.

Good job - it is a bit daunting but once done not too bad - just lots of bolts and tie-wraps and making sure you slide it all back in the way it came out.

Cheers
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Old 01-31-2011, 08:42 PM   #19
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Thanks!

I just bookmark this post fro future reference!!

Thanks so much for posting!

Bill in OR
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Old 01-31-2011, 08:57 PM   #20
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Thanks!

I just bookmark this post fro future reference!!

Thanks so much for posting!

Bill in OR

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Old 01-31-2011, 10:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamming View Post
Very Nice indeed!!! I printed and added to my BMW binder...if that's ok with you.


Thanks so much for sharing!! I'm grateful for every information that makes me feel more independant from dealership.

Amazing to see in what excellent condition (even dry) you found the clutch splines.

I have two questions:
In what condition did you find the splines at the gearbox outlet / driveshaft and did you lube those at any earlier occation?
Is it really neccessary to disconnect the rear brake from the system or is there a way arround? With the servo ABS system I'm not sure if there is any magic needed to get possible air out of the system if one disconnects it.

jogo screwed with this post 01-31-2011 at 11:09 PM
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Old 02-01-2011, 06:22 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disco Dean View Post
I have some notes from mine that might help if I got yours right...

#5 - I found out the hard way that you not have to take off the rear plastic silver seat cowling or the grab rails or seat clamp at all - the bottom black plastic seat pan drops down with the removal of the 6 screws from underneath the rear subframe. Remove the 4 torx holding the plastic shroud on and the two in the relay box at the front of the shroud and it drops down to show the harness and tie-wraps...

#9 - I found the carb clamps easy to remove and also easy to clip back up with very little effort

I also saw that you removed the right side throttle/carb body completely - I didn't find a need to do that at all as the right side rubber came off simply and easily and slide on just as well - it helped me to not have to worry about both of those clamps and related crap.

One note that anyone who tries this will find out also is that the left side carb has to come off completely if for no other reason than to get to a single frame bolt hidden behind it - bugger that is.
Disco - Thanks, this is exactly the kind of additional feedback and advice I hoped my original post would generate.

Your comments on #5 certainly sound several steps quicker than my attack-from-the-top method, and I'll give that a try next time.

For #9, please share your method as I had anything but an easy time with those clamps. Partly due to where the actual clamp points were positioned on my bike, but I had a very difficult time squeezing each clamp's small "bumps" with pliers (I even tried several different types) to then allow release of the catch mechanism. Even while taking them off, I knew they'd be tough to get back on. I spent about 30 seconds trying to get one back on at reassembly before admitting it just wasn't worth the effort (fight?), tossed them in the trash and got worm-type hose clamps out to replace them. My OEM clamps are gone, but hopefully your info will prove helpful to others. Even BMW used worm clamps in this area on my other bikes to the best of my recollection, so I figured I'd go back to them.

Absolutely right that my removal of the right side air box-to-TB manifold, and probably the TB itself, was unnecessary, one of those trial and error things I saw in hindsight that I won't remove again.

Thanks again!

For others who have asked, I did this write-up in the hopes that it might be useful to others, so please use whatever info you find may assist in your undertakings. Also, thanks to all for the positive feedback!
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Old 02-01-2011, 06:37 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jogo View Post
I have two questions:
In what condition did you find the splines at the gearbox outlet / driveshaft and did you lube those at any earlier occation?
Is it really neccessary to disconnect the rear brake from the system or is there a way arround? With the servo ABS system I'm not sure if there is any magic needed to get possible air out of the system if one disconnects it.
All splines (clutch/GB input shaft, GB output shaft/driveshaft front u-joint, driveshaft rear u-joint/FD input shaft) were in excellent condition with no wear evident. Of course, I lube the driveshaft rear u-joint/FD input shaft splines every 12k miles at FD oil change time. At about 35k miles, the GB output shaft seal was replaced under warranty so the dealer lubed those splines at that time. I don't know if they were dry when he pulled it apart.

On the other bikes I mentioned on which I've done this task, it was not necessary to disconnect any rear brake lines. That was just not possible on my '07 GSA, as the two hard lines I disconnected were routed through the subframe in such a way that they had to be removed altogether or just removed at the front like I did. Believe me I studied this before doing it, but it was really very quick, easy and painless. Can't answer for servo-assist ABS-equipped bikes, or those without ABS at all, as mine has ABS but is servo-free.
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Old 02-02-2011, 07:46 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdub View Post
Disco - Thanks, this is exactly the kind of additional feedback and advice I hoped my original post would generate.
For #9, please share your method as I had anything but an easy time with those clamps. Partly due to where the actual clamp points were positioned on my bike, but I had a very difficult time squeezing each clamp's small "bumps" with pliers (I even tried several different types) to then allow release of the catch mechanism. Even while taking them off, I knew they'd be tough to get back on. I spent about 30 seconds trying to get one back on at reassembly before admitting it just wasn't worth the effort (fight?), tossed them in the trash and got worm-type hose clamps out to replace them. My OEM clamps are gone, but hopefully your info will prove helpful to others. Even BMW used worm clamps in this area on my other bikes to the best of my recollection, so I figured I'd go back to them.

It really is a feel thing and a proper/good set of pliers that work. Fst - my father had a set of old curved end adjustable pliers that could go wide enough and still keep a perpendicular angle to the little tabs on the clamp - which meant i could grasp the tiny little tabs with a good "purchase" Then it seemed like I had to squeeze really hard and then they just gently popped open - the next one I didn't struggle so much - squeezed and gently angled the pliers and they came off - The trick to getting them on is sort of the same - it feels like you have a lot of force but you realize that they are already clamped and it didn't even feel like they were on. Now I realize this doesn't say to much but I guess what I mean is that it works without a big struggle so be gently but firm - and the right pliers help immensely. Now I did scratch them up a bit learning but I figure they will be nice enough looking and good for a few more tries.

I wanted to note about the brake lines - (servo assist - my bike and abs equiped) you have to take the hard lines off like you said and the easiest way is right at the transfer box where you did it. The process for bleeding the brakes is highlighted in JVB's video and on his site - it is pretty simple but more complicated than a non abs/servo - system. It is not rocket science but again the proper tools (ie beemerboneyard funnel) makes the job so much easier.

And, yes - keeping the swing arm attached with the drive shaft in - is the easiest way as the rubber hood on the drive shaft - to tranny - is a real PITA to get your fingers in when it is all attached - much easier to just clip in the drive shaft and then slide the swing arm over it and align the rubber cover... much much easier.

Double check your center stand bolts as both of mine were broken - it was a common problem on 05-07 bikes with bolt upgrades and mine proved that.
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:11 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disco Dean View Post

I wanted to note about the brake lines - (servo assist - my bike and abs equiped) you have to take the hard lines off like you said and the easiest way is right at the transfer box where you did it. The process for bleeding the brakes is highlighted in JVB's video and on his site - it is pretty simple but more complicated than a non abs/servo - system. It is not rocket science but again the proper tools (ie beemerboneyard funnel) makes the job so much easier.
Thanks for the answer to my question. I do have Jim's DVD and with help of that I renewed the brake fluid some weeks ago. Have not ridden since but I think I got it right.
However, during that procedure no air gets into the circuit as the new fluid just pushes out the old.
When disconnecting the lines one has to assume to get some air in there and I am not sure if one would get that out just by following the procedure of fluid exchange?
What is your view?
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:27 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jogo View Post
Thanks for the answer to my question. I do have Jim's DVD and with help of that I renewed the brake fluid some weeks ago. Have not ridden since but I think I got it right.
However, during that procedure no air gets into the circuit as the new fluid just pushes out the old.
When disconnecting the lines one has to assume to get some air in there and I am not sure if one would get that out just by following the procedure of fluid exchange?
What is your view?
It depends. On a servo-ABS bike the servo pressure will allow an easy flush, even with air in it. On the non-Servo bikes it is still often doable to get the air out, but sometimes you can't get the fluid to flow and need a tool like a mightyvac.

Jim
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:34 PM   #27
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I replaced my clutch pressure plate last fall and went through a similar experience. Overall, this is not all that hard to do. Like jdub I replaced the BMW hose clamps with worm style ones. They were easy to take off but mine self-destructed trying to put them back on.

Here are a couple things I noted during this procedure:
1. The BMW manual says to replace the top bolt on either side mounting the rear frame to the engine with headless ones, as these also support the frame coming from the front head stock.



This is the bolt I fabbed up. I used my dremel to cut off the head and cut a slot for a flat blade screw driver.



This is the left side bolt, the top one, that is replaced. The one on the right side is in the same spot. Here is a pic with the replacement bolt in place.



2. Here is a picture of the hidden bolt below the air box that holds the rear frame to the engine. Its the one top right in the picture.



3. When you are pulling the rear frame away, if you don't want to mess with your final drive have someone slide the driveshaft of the transmission otherwise, like mine, it may pull forward and slide off the final drive shaft. When reassembling this is also the spot to have a helper guide not only the drive shaft but also the rubber boot onto the transmission. I didn't have a helper and needed plenty of expletives before I had that boot slid over the transmission output.

4. If, like me, you are in there to do work on your clutch, you just need to remove the six bolts mounting the clutch and pressure plate to the engine output plate. These should be replaced when reassembling. I didn't have the tool for aligning the clutch, so I centered the clutch plate by eye, finger tightened the six bolts, then slid the transmission with the clutch release rod onto its guide pins and tightened up one of the clutch bolts accessible above the transmission. Then I carefully pulled the transmission back of and torqued the bolts properly in the usual criss cross order. Worked like a charm.



That's my contribution to jdub's excellent write up. I have a bunch more pictures, so if someone want to see something not already in pics, let me know and I'll see if I have it.
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Old 02-02-2011, 03:01 PM   #28
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Cool2 Here we go

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Originally Posted by Semper Fi View Post
Superb - definately bookmarked!!!


Now his ego will never be the same.....

The Eagle

PS....nice job...You want to do my 1100GS.....
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Old 02-02-2011, 10:54 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimVonBaden View Post
It depends. On a servo-ABS bike the servo pressure will allow an easy flush, even with air in it. On the non-Servo bikes it is still often doable to get the air out, but sometimes you can't get the fluid to flow and need a tool like a mightyvac.

Jim
Thanks a lot Jim!
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Old 02-03-2011, 05:06 AM   #30
bigjohn66
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Special tool question

About the top bolt "special tool", what's the bolt diameter and length needed? Thanks!
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