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Old 04-18-2013, 04:16 PM   #106
jdub OP
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Been off riding my GSA in the TX hill country for the last 12 days (great trip ); man has this thread gotten busy during that time!

I've received numerous PMs asking me if I could e-mail a Word document of my original posting that started this thread (most of page 1). I don't have it in Word form, but all anyone needs to do is to copy any of the text and pictures and paste them into your own Word document and then save it on your computer.

Cheers!
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Old 04-27-2013, 05:59 AM   #107
Guy Young
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Finally finished up my clutch replacement project

The customer went with the Touratech oil resistant friction plate and a new BMW (only game in town) pressure plate:



After replacing the transmission input shaft seal, remounted the transmission:



The rear splines on this bike became dislodged during disassembly, and the rear joint had positioned itself so it wouldn't allow the frame halves to go all the way together. Only way to fix that was to pull the rear wheel and swing the final drive down so the rear joint could be slipped back into place. I trussed up the rear frame section to hold everything in place and to provide stability to the mess once I pulled the rear wheel:



Two frame halves reunited:





Piecing all the other stuff back on:



Finished bike after a test ride and checking throttle body sync. Customer picked the bike up last evening:



Now that I know the procedure and being a little less intimidated, I'm sure the next one will be a little easier. That's not say I'd want another one coming in tomorrow.

EDIT: Final comments:

Many thanks to Jdub for his step-by-step procedure. It, the official BMW CD, and my own disassembly shots helped a lot it piecing all the "stuff" back together. Also want to thank JVB for his words of wisdom.

Friction plate alignment: I used an SAE 7/16" deep well socket and the clutch push rod to align the new clutch disc. Worked perfectly and during mating of the transmission to the engine; the input shaft slipped right into place.

Also, I had made some (4) alignment rods/dowels when I was working on an R1150R, and used these to help support and guide the transmission back into position. They eliminate the potential of placing undue stress on the input shaft and clutch plate when fitting things back up. You can see them in the first pix.


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Guy Young screwed with this post 04-27-2013 at 07:31 AM
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:43 AM   #108
dirtcrack
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Lower subframe Bolts

When re-assembling my 05 1200GS after splitting it to change seals I waited to install the lower subframe bolts since I would use them to attach the crash bars. When I was mounting the crash bars and installing the lower subframe bolts the left side bolt holes weren't lining up between the engine and the frame. They were off about 1/2". I had to pry it down pretty hard to get it to line up. I tried jacking up the bike under the skid plate but it didn't help. I finally got it lined up by prying the subframe down and installed the bolts. The right side was OK and lined up fine. Is this normal?
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Old 04-29-2013, 02:02 PM   #109
Guy Young
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Average_Joe View Post
When re-assembling my 05 1200GS after splitting it to change seals I waited to install the lower subframe bolts since I would use them to attach the crash bars. When I was mounting the crash bars and installing the lower subframe bolts the left side bolt holes weren't lining up between the engine and the frame. They were off about 1/2". I had to pry it down pretty hard to get it to line up. I tried jacking up the bike under the skid plate but it didn't help. I finally got it lined up by prying the subframe down and installed the bolts. The right side was OK and lined up fine. Is this normal?
I've only done one of these, but doesn't sound normal to me. The mounting points on the '07 I worked on were spot on once I got the final drive joint reconnected.

Did you noticed any frame "sproinging" when you originally pulled the upper, or lower left side bolts out? If something's amuck now, it musta been the same when you disassembled the bike...... unless the rear section got tweaked somehow after it was apart.

That's pretty stout triangulation in the frame section between the upper, and lower mounting points.



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Old 04-29-2013, 05:55 PM   #110
dirtcrack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy Young View Post
I've only done one of these, but doesn't sound normal to me. The mounting points on the '07 I worked on were spot on once I got the final drive joint reconnected.

Did you noticed any frame "sproinging" when you originally pulled the upper, or lower left side bolts out? If something's amuck now, it musta been the same when you disassembled the bike...... unless the rear section got tweaked somehow after it was apart.

That's pretty stout triangulation in the frame section between the upper, and lower mounting points.



.

I didn't notice any springing when I disassembled and nothing happened that I'm aware of after it was apart. I rode it for a couple of hours today and everything seems OK. I am going to keep an eye on the weld joints in that area for a while just to be sure.
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Old 04-30-2013, 03:23 AM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Average_Joe View Post
When re-assembling my 05 1200GS after splitting it to change seals I waited to install the lower subframe bolts since I would use them to attach the crash bars.
I agree those subframe holes not aligning doesn't sound right at all. I learned early in my aircraft wrenching career to not tighten anything on a given component, cover, panel, etc., until all of the bolts or screws were at least started in their threads in order to avoid misalignment. Since you waited until later to install these it's possible that somehow caused a degree of misalignment, but still strange considering the stoutness of the subframe.

Loosening all of the subframe bolts at once and then retorquing them could relieve any stress that may be present due to misalignment.
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Old 04-30-2013, 05:15 AM   #112
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When assembling the last one I did I found a similar issue. Some tension was put on the frame moving it half an inch. This was a combination of the way the bike was jacked to support it, and the use of the centerstand for the back. After I got it close I used a jack on the FD to align it, but it was still off a bit. Once I got the bolt in I removed the fd jack and you could see the bike align itself.

I agree, loosen the bolts then retighten them.

Jim
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Old 04-30-2013, 02:27 PM   #113
dirtcrack
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I loosened and retighted all the bolts. Everything seems fine. I rode for about 5 hours today and ahhhhh.... Feels so nice. So glad to have it back together and riding again. Ready to rack up some miles now. I love these bikes.
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Old 12-20-2013, 09:50 PM   #114
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Thanks for very details steps.
Hope I can do the same.
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Old 12-21-2013, 03:11 AM   #115
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Good luck!

This might be the winter that I replace my bike's clutch (still original and performing with no problems, but now near the service limit for thickness). I may add some edits/updates to the original and subsequent posts here after diving in again. And I even have a new camera to take better pictures!
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:20 AM   #116
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Unable to ride here due to all of the snow, ice and cold temps, so I split my bike again last weekend and replaced the clutch as a preventive task. The bike had 133,360 miles on it at that time, and although never a problem with the clutch I figured now was a good time to ensure no issues with it during upcoming trips.

I referred a couple of times to the process notes I’d made on page one of this thread, and really didn’t do too much differently the second time around except:
1) Kept the right throttle body connected to the cylinder head, and only disconnected the airbox boot where it joined the rear of the TB.
2) Kept the driveshaft inside the Paralever housing to speed the process when re-mating the halves. But, just as Guy Young documented above had happened to him, when the halves were coming apart I didn’t notice that the driveshaft front yoke splines had hung up a bit on the gearbox output splines and in doing so disengaged the rear driveshaft yoke from the FD input splines. This was after I had pulled back the front accordion boot and had disengaged the front yoke splines from the locating circlip on the gearbox output shaft splines. Once I had the front splines engaged while going back together, I turned the rear wheel and noticed the driveshaft wasn’t turning and knew what had happened. Pulled the rear wheel, pivoted the FD downward, re-engaged the rear splines with the FD and then was able to move forward again. Definitely something to keep in mind when splitting the bike.
3) Since it was easily accessible, I changed the Paralever front accordion boot this time due to the start of age/weather cracking on it. I didn’t have this problem the first time, maybe because the old boot wasn’t as stiff, but the bottom front lip of the new boot was too high going back together and got a bit pinched by the gearbox output flange. Took a little extra time and effort to work the lip back down and around into position on the flange, so also something to pay extra attention to when re-mating the halves.

The gearbox once again was stuck to the engine case, but this time only at the upper left locating dowel (not at both locating dowels like the first time). Once again used a heavy duty tapered putty knife tapped into the split line at a few different places, and shot a bit of penetrating oil into the gap as well. Finally got it loose, slid the gearbox input splines straight back out of the clutch splines, put the gearbox onto the work bench and found that indeed a bit more corrosion had formed at this interface. Cleaned up both surfaces again with Scotchbrite, and applied some waterproof grease to both spots.

The pictures below show that 65,190 miles after I had greased the splines three years ago when I started this thread, they now were in much better condition than they were 68,170 miles after the factory had put the bike together. I don’t know what (if any) lube the factory used, but the Guard Dog moly paste grease I’d used is definitely good stuff and hung in there very well. Of course, I used it again going back together.







Installation/alignment of the new clutch assembly was very easy. I loosely bolted up the new clutch assembly and eyeballed/moved the friction disc as close to centered as I could. I engaged the gearbox input shaft splines with the clutch splines, and then slid the gearbox into position engaging the two locating dowels with the engine case. I tightened one of the exposed clutch bolts at the top of the gearbox, slid the gearbox back off, torqued the new clutch bolts to spec in a cross pattern, applied the spline lube then slid the gearbox back on and torqued the three mount bolts to the engine case.

New clutch assembly parts:



The clutch friction disc thickness was down to 4.7 mm, so it was approaching the 4.4 to 4.6 mm service limit. This clutch had gotten “hot and fragrant” numerous times during off-road excursions, and that’s likely what resulted in the discoloration and light surface cracking of the clutch housing and pressure plate contact surfaces. Going together I used a new OEM clutch housing and pressure plate, new clutch bolts and a Siebenrock Basic Plus friction disc from Beemer Boneyard (new thickness 6.35 mm), and a 140 mile shakedown run yesterday (roads were finally clear enough!) confirmed that everything was working in harmony and the bike felt great.

Old clutch assembly:







The feel of the new clutch assembly is actually much lighter than it had been before the clutch change, and now feels just like the clutch on my buddy’s 2012 R1200GS (there was a noticeable difference before between our bikes). Maybe my clutch was always stiff, or maybe it gradually got stiffer over time (the old/original clutch diaphragm spring getting stiffer as time went on is the only reason I can think of), but regardless it is very nice and light now.

No leaks or seepage at any engine and gearbox seals, so I didn't "fix what wasn't broken" just because I was there.



Of course, I had to properly celebrate this successful wrenching exercise when it was completed:





Safe and adventurous riding and wrenching to you all!
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Step-by-Step R1200GSA Gearbox Removal and Clutch Spline Lube Process
Another 140,000 Mile R1200GS Adv.
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